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Creedence Clearwater Revival — I Heard It Through The Grapevine
Album: Chronicle
Avg rating:
7.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 861









Released: 1969
Length: 10:46
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Ooh-ooh, bet you're wond'ring how I knew
'Bout your plans to make me blue
With some other guy that you knew before
Between the two of us guys, you know I love you more

It took me by surprise I must say
When I found out yesterday

Ooh-ooh I heard it through the grapevine
Not much longer would you be mine
Ooh-ooh I heard it through the grapevine
And I'm just about to lose my mind
Honey honey yeah

You know that a man ain't supposed to cry
But these tears I can't, hold inside
Losin' you would end my life you see
'Cause you mean that much to me

You could have told me yourself
That you found someone else

Instead I heard it through the grapevine
Not much longer would you be mine
Ooh-ooh I heard it through the grapevine
And I'm just about to lose my mind
Honey honey yeah

People say you, hear from what you see
Nah-nah-not from what you hear
I can't help, bein' confused
If it's true, won't you tell me dear

Do you plan to let me go
For the other guy that you knew before

Ooh-ooh I heard it through the grapevine
Not much longer would you be mine
Ooh-ooh I heard it through the grapevine
And I'm just about to lose my mind
Honey honey yeah

Ooh-ooh I heard it through the grapevine
Not much longer would you be mine
Ooh-ooh I heard it through the grapevine
And I'm just about to lose my mind

Ooh-ooh I heard it through the grapevine
Comments (163)add comment
Way to go RP
 fredriley wrote:
'I heard it on Twitter' is just not the same thing...

 
{#Notworthy}
 jasonsymson wrote:
This is better than the original.

 
Yes it is.
'I heard it on Twitter' is just not the same thing...
In my dreams I am a rock and roll singer and I have Jon Fogerty's voice. Of all the voices available to choose from in dreams, this is the one I'd pick.
Dave Mathews Alert!! Emergency PSD!!!!! 

And now this. Ah.................. 
{#Bananajam}yeah
This PSD lasted me all the way through the next song that I actually would have PSD'ed anyway — a twofer!  Solid cover.  People will always cry "blasphemy" but it's a fine line between being faithful to the original and just doing what the top 40 band at the bar does every night.  I like to think of a good cover as displaying a work of art from another perspective; like someone giving a commentary or describing their take on it that you wouldn't have otherwise thought of.
It is SO great to hear the full version on the radio.
 
I HOIDIT!
This is better than the original.
cool cover, by a great band....{#Dance}....would love to hear  some stuff from " EYE OF THE ZOMBIE "  it was ignored by " critics " but has some great tunes....{#Fire}....I also love the fact that John had the balls to take his songwrighting to the SUPREME COURT and beat the vampires of the music industry.{#Jump}
Not nearly as bad as some try to say. If you like JF's singing and intermediate guitar jammin' it's fun. It was one of the songs I thought about kids playing first time I heard Joe's Garage.
"... all we knew and easy too so we wouldn't get it wrong..."
I think the phonograph needle is stuck!
... this is the song what woke me up...
You "hoid" what now?
 Misterfixit wrote:
This song is perfect for smoking Cannibus Sativia and having lengthy, diverse sexual activities.  I was going to say that it was great doping and screwing music, but figured that might be thought too crude by our August Body at RP.

 
 

For the January crowd, however, it's just fine.
 Indeed! Try that with the live version! Even better.

Misterfixit wrote:
This song is perfect for smoking Cannibus Sativia and having lengthy, diverse sexual activities.  I was going to say that it was great doping and screwing music, but figured that might be thought too crude by our August Body at RP.

 
 


This version has no 'slick' and no 'smooth'. Its harsh with too many crashy parts. Just not necessary...really. Annoying is what I'm hearing. Besides...raisins have forever tarnished this song no matter who performs it. Btw, is it necessary to have this song be so incredibly long? C'mon Fogerty...we get the point.
 Misterfixit wrote:
This song is perfect for smoking Cannibus Sativia and having lengthy, diverse sexual activities.  I was going to say that it was great doping and screwing music, but figured that might be thought too crude by our August Body at RP.

 
 
Well, it IS August, now ...
 
This song is perfect for smoking Cannibus Sativia and having lengthy, diverse sexual activities.  I was going to say that it was great doping and screwing music, but figured that might be thought too crude by our August Body at RP.

 
 madebytim wrote:
Marvin Gaye's version is just a lot better, the arrangement also.
 
That is also true of the versions by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles and Gladys Knight & The Pips.
 lowelltr wrote:
And on and on and on and on....make it stop!! Possibly the worst song ever recorded
 

Go away and don't ever come back...

Ok - I guess you are entitled to express your opinion - no matter how ludicrous it is.
{#Dancingbanana}loooove it
 madebytim wrote:
Marvin gaye' version is just a lot better, the arrangement also.
 
True, but CCR give this tune a pretty good ride.
 unclehud wrote:

memory:  late at night with EL and DG, parked along a dirt road in the middle of the woods, my parents' station wagon with the windows rolled up to keep in all the smoke, WBBQ-FM blasting this song as loud as that Chevy stereo would play.

 
Dude. And, like, your parents never smelled anything funny the next day...

WBBQ—perfect name for a smoke-out. 

I could never have gotten away with anything like this (envy). It's been decades since I've been stoned and I do miss it from time to time. 


I'd give it a 10, but, well, you know...

 
Geez, looking at some of these comments you'd think none of the listeners have ever been to a concert where the musicians just jammed.

Not the greatest tune of all time, far from it, but do like it and especially like the jam 

Great job RP finding an extended (excellent) version of this song that makes an old classic seem fresh again! Thanks!
 unclehud wrote:

memory:  late at night with EL and DG, parked along a dirt road in the middle of the woods, my parents' station wagon with the windows rolled up to keep in all the smoke, WBBQ-FM blasting this song as loud as that Chevy stereo would play.


 

Right on. bro.

memory:  late at night with EL and DG, parked along a dirt road in the middle of the woods, my parents' station wagon with the windows rolled up to keep in all the smoke, WBBQ-FM blasting this song as loud as that Chevy stereo would play.


This is one of those I forgot to rate .
Marvin gaye' version is just a lot better, the arrangement also.
Marvin Gay did a smashup job of this song.  I'd love to hear it.
Not too many songs where Fogerty shared the mike. I can't recall any besides this one.

 lowelltr wrote:
And on and on and on and on....make it stop!! Possibly the worst song ever recorded
 
That's just silly.  Have you heard every song ever recorded?  I think this is MUCH better than Rebecca Black's "Friday."

But I suppose if that's your bag, who am I to judge?

I like it when a group takes a song and completely reinterprets it,  Hate to call it a 'cover'.

Less cymbals, more cowbell.
Yes kids, it's longer than 2 minutes; get over it.
 ce wrote:
redstorm wrote:
NYC, born and bred, (along with a stint in europe) and i still like these country boy

copymonkey wrote:
Actually, weren't these guys from Berkley? Or right near there? I guess, compared to San Francisco-that's kinda the country.

As a Dutchman with some interest in accents in English, I've always thought that the vocals in this particular CCR song are a VERY strong example of an accent from the NYC area.
     "I hea'y'd it through the grapevine"
In another song:
     "Big wheels keep on tu'y'ning, Proud Mary keeps on Bu'y'ning"
I believe the accent is from "New Je'y'sey", just accross the Hudson river.

Can somebody confi'y'm this, or enlighten me?
 
The affection is/was a take on Mississippi delta diphthongs, "choich" for "church", "woik" for "work" and so on. My physics prof back in the days was a black man from southern Mississippi, and he had 'em pegged from the get go, "Those boys wanna be from down there, but they ain't." The "ain't" with a wink. His specialty was quantum mechanics, the last I saw him, he was editing his correspondence with Einstein. "Woik" indeed.

Later edit: CCR was from El Cerrito, a little burg just north of Berkeley.


Man, what a boost for late morning revival {#Dancingbanana}

And on and on and on and on....make it stop!! Possibly the worst song ever recorded
Jamming (in) the sixties?

{#Drummer}{#Drummer}{#Drummer}{#Bananajam}A classic. Excuse me, I mean a loooong classic that jams.

Ok..this's the top 20 version,now ,can we please have the long one !?{#Jump}
 TimeWaster wrote:
Yep, still sucks.
 
I don't know, I usually cannot stand CCR, but don't think I have ever heard that long version of this song.  The last 4 minutes really had me moving in my chair....

Yep, still sucks.
 xtalman wrote:
this is a bit toooooo long
 
{#Meditate} It's as long as it needs to be..............

 bb_bubbab wrote:
San Francisco, actually.  Berkley was close.

John Fogerty, Doug Clifford, and Stu Cook (all born 1945) met at senior high school in El Cerrito, California and began playing instrumentals and "juke box standards" together under the name The Blue Velvets.

 
ce wrote:
redstorm wrote:
NYC, born and bred, (along with a stint in europe) and i still like these country boy

copymonkey wrote:
Actually, weren't these guys from Berkley? Or right near there? I guess, compared to San Francisco-that's kinda the country.

As a Dutchman with some interest in accents in English, I've always thought that the vocals in this particular CCR song are a VERY strong example of an accent from the NYC area.
     "I hea'y'd it through the grapevine"
In another song:
     "Big wheels keep on tu'y'ning, Proud Mary keeps on Bu'y'ning"
I believe the accent is from "New Je'y'sey", just accross the Hudson river.

Can somebody confi'y'm this, or enlighten me?
 
 
Actually folks, Berkeley is real close as El Cerrito is next to Berkeley down closer to the bay and north.  And if Berkeley is the country, that would make me a hillbilly, cuz I was born there in 1952.  San Francisco is across the Bay, we hillbillies take exception to being associated with them thar wierdos on the other side of the Bay.

{#Cheers} Y'all


Dare I say it ... this song needs more cowbell.
ce wrote:
redstorm wrote:
NYC, born and bred, (along with a stint in europe) and i still like these country boy

copymonkey wrote:
Actually, weren't these guys from Berkley? Or right near there? I guess, compared to San Francisco-that's kinda the country.

As a Dutchman with some interest in accents in English, I've always thought that the vocals in this particular CCR song are a VERY strong example of an accent from the NYC area.
"I hea'y'd it through the grapevine"
In another song:
"Big wheels keep on tu'y'ning, Proud Mary keeps on Bu'y'ning"
I believe the accent is from "New Je'y'sey", just accross the Hudson river.

Can somebody confi'y'm this, or enlighten me?
Most agree these Bay area boys were channeling (very nicely) swamp pop, a flavor of rock native to the Gulf coast from east Texas to the Florida panhandle. The only NYC connection I can make is from the Irish Channel neighborhood in New Orleans, which has a dialect and flow very similar to that found in Brooklyn. Not surprising considering both neighborhoods were originally populated by Irish immigrants who came over to escape famine and perform manual labor, and ended up with a strong representation in the Police and Fire departments of both areas. I find the southern iteration less nasal and slower in delivery, with a less of a clip between words. The 'y' sound you're citing is definitely shared by both. Irish Channel residents are called (and call themselves) Yats - due to their habitual and somewhat existential greeting of "where ya at?" When I was a kid, the response was an automatic "hapnin' Darlin!", indicating that all was right in your world.

this is a bit toooooo long
It's like THE WIZ wIth an all white cast
Pedestrian and uninspired.  If it was 2 min long it would be OK.
Seriously, of all the CCR songs, this one? There's a phrase that goes like this: "played to fckin' death".
 Poacher wrote:

Yes - Pogues - Fairytale Of New York 

It is listed as godlike in your personal list.

. . . you did ask. . .  
 

It's not my fault you have no taste in music is it?
I just took a pee break and this thing is still going!! {#Frustrated}
please make it stop....

Wait! This is an April Fool's joke, right?
 TimeWaster wrote:
It's still going.
 
And going . . . and going . . . {#Guitarist}
nice nice niceeeee! {#Drummer}
It's still going.
 tiggers wrote:
Great! A stoner verison of 'I heard it through the grapevine'. Can a piece of music suck more than this? Doubt it!
 
Yes - Pogues - Fairytale Of New York 

It is listed as godlike in your personal list.

. . . you did ask. . .  
Great! A stoner verison of 'I heard it through the grapevine'. Can a piece of music suck more than this? Doubt it!
I hoid that this version sucks, and I hoid right.
 ce wrote:
redstorm wrote:
NYC, born and bred, (along with a stint in europe) and i still like these country boy

copymonkey wrote:
Actually, weren't these guys from Berkley? Or right near there? I guess, compared to San Francisco-that's kinda the country.

As a Dutchman with some interest in accents in English, I've always thought that the vocals in this particular CCR song are a VERY strong example of an accent from the NYC area.
     "I hea'y'd it through the grapevine"
In another song:
     "Big wheels keep on tu'y'ning, Proud Mary keeps on Bu'y'ning"
I believe the accent is from "New Je'y'sey", just accross the Hudson river.

Can somebody confi'y'm this, or enlighten me?
 

I think its just an affectation (check out the big brain on gutboy!) kinda like the way Billie Joe Armstrong of Greenday sings like an english punk.

My hubby and I usually hate endless 70s noodle fests (see: anything the Grateful Dead ever did), but this one, wow. So marvelous.


San Francisco, actually.  Berkley was close.

John Fogerty, Doug Clifford, and Stu Cook (all born 1945) met at senior high school in El Cerrito, California and began playing instrumentals and "juke box standards" together under the name The Blue Velvets.

 
ce wrote:
redstorm wrote:
NYC, born and bred, (along with a stint in europe) and i still like these country boy

copymonkey wrote:
Actually, weren't these guys from Berkley? Or right near there? I guess, compared to San Francisco-that's kinda the country.

As a Dutchman with some interest in accents in English, I've always thought that the vocals in this particular CCR song are a VERY strong example of an accent from the NYC area.
     "I hea'y'd it through the grapevine"
In another song:
     "Big wheels keep on tu'y'ning, Proud Mary keeps on Bu'y'ning"
I believe the accent is from "New Je'y'sey", just accross the Hudson river.

Can somebody confi'y'm this, or enlighten me?
 


Perfect for that tribe of whiners who'll show up soon complaining about Alice's Restaurant being too long! Weed 'em out ahead of time, Bill!
Didn't think any other white boys could cover Marvin quite so well until I heard Marshall Crenshaw do "Sexual Healing" as a concert closing encore. It just sizzled.
 Geecheeboy wrote:
I just love this extended version.
 

Oh yeah. They could extend this another 20 minutes and I'd be foot-dancing with fervency in my cubical the entire time.

 ce wrote:
As a Dutchman with some interest in accents in English, I've always thought that the vocals in this particular CCR song are a VERY strong example of an accent from the NYC area.
     "I hea'y'd it through the grapevine"
In another song:
     "Big wheels keep on tu'y'ning, Proud Mary keeps on Bu'y'ning"
I believe the accent is from "New Je'y'sey", just accross the Hudson river.

Can somebody confi'y'm this, or enlighten me?
 
It seems so exaggerated... not sure you can chalk it up to an accent.

On Hell's Top 10. {#Fire}{#Devil_pimp}{#Fire}
redstorm wrote:
NYC, born and bred, (along with a stint in europe) and i still like these country boy

copymonkey wrote:
Actually, weren't these guys from Berkley? Or right near there? I guess, compared to San Francisco-that's kinda the country.

As a Dutchman with some interest in accents in English, I've always thought that the vocals in this particular CCR song are a VERY strong example of an accent from the NYC area.
     "I hea'y'd it through the grapevine"
In another song:
     "Big wheels keep on tu'y'ning, Proud Mary keeps on Bu'y'ning"
I believe the accent is from "New Je'y'sey", just accross the Hudson river.

Can somebody confi'y'm this, or enlighten me?


There are not words to describe how turgid this is. A minus 1 if ever there was one. Not sucko-barfo - it's just shite


 Mandible wrote:

 
to this day, I can NOT hear this song w/o thinking of them
plus christmas brings the 'here we come a-waffling' claymation memories too

My arms are getting tired, air-drumming through this whole song...but I like it, have the original on vinyl, don't miss the scratches, though!

Let's have a vote on the worst cover ever.  For me, it would be Grand Funk's version of Gimme Shelter, Roxy Music's version of Eight Miles High, and that entire Bruce Lash album.

This one has to be top ten, though.



I just love this extended version.
make it stop

I just graduated from college, started a business, made millions, SOLD the business, bought a vineyard and took a long stroll through the grapevines and this song was playing the whole time and it's still not done...

 redstorm wrote:
NYC, born and bred, (along with a stint in europe) and i still like these country boys, though all the white guys in high school tried and prided themselves on dressing like these guys in flannel shirts (jeans were not allowed) But the more I see all these complaints I'll have to raise it up to a 8 from a 7 {#Lol}
 

Actually, weren't these guys from Berkley? Or right near there? I guess, compared to San Francisco—that's kinda the country.

I doubt you could actually hear through the grapevine if it were this long.


NYC, born and bred, (along with a stint in europe) and i still like these country boys, though all the white guys in high school tried and prided themselves on dressing like these guys in flannel shirts (jeans were not allowed) But the more I see all these complaints I'll have to raise it up to a 8 from a 7 {#Lol}
 LorraineV1 wrote:
When will it end?
 
Never! Heaven and Hell singing it both! {#Bananajam}{#Devil_pimp}{#Innocent}

coyote620 wrote:
enough already!!!!


Loop it! Loop it!

Wonder how long they kept playing after the fade?
MJMJ wrote:
Good lord that goes on forever.


yep, thanks Lord Goldsmith!
10.

enough already!!!!
When will it end?
Irritating
I "Huh-oidit" . . . love it!
You know, I'm surprised at the negative feedback. I really liked it... nice to hear a darker version of a great but light song.
 dangerboy wrote:

This song would be too long at two minutes and twenty seven seconds. It feels like twenty seven minutes and two seconds. I had to turn the radio off. yuck
also raised on NY. The Mars Bar forever!
 
 

Couldn't agree more, utterly dire and way way too long. Why do these meandering drug induced jamming sessions some you call music have to go on for so long. It's alost like toture and definitely a waste of bandwidth.

 countyman wrote:
Can't go wrong with one of them Creedence songs.

hmmm...

What's next?  The 12-minute dance mix of "Mustang Sally"?
rtwingo wrote:
I HOYID it through the grapevine? Oy Vey...
 
{#Lol}

I HOYID it through the grapevine? Oy Vey...
 raisedonCFNY wrote:
MAKE IT STOP!
 
This song would be too long at two minutes and twenty seven seconds. It feels like twenty seven minutes and two seconds. I had to turn the radio off. yuck
also raised on NY. The Mars Bar forever!
 
Creedence does a pretty good song. 

Over and over again. . . .
Good lord that goes on forever.
ok I like this song but we know bill doesn't need a bathroom break so could you please make it end?
repititious...numbing...zzzz...
Can't go wrong with one of them Creedence songs. :bananajam: :clap:
cutterjudd wrote:
"If your good you will live forever, and if you're bad, you'll die when you die"...............
"living forever" doesn't mean you'll "live" in the same context of what you're feeling now.
Jelani wrote:
What makes you think you'll be able to hear anything after you die?
"If your good you will live forever, and if you're bad, you'll die when you die"...............
I have the original vinyl of this that I hoisted from my parents. Hearing the pops and clicks just brings me back.
Misterfixit wrote:
Yes, I've heard that too. Luther played a lot of music which he inherited one way or the other. Like Hound Dog Taylor, Luther was simply a great Bluesman who played what he felt like needed playing and added his own unique style to it. Same-o with R.L. Burnside and his Toasting. No musician deserves to lose rights to their artistry. Luther was repaid in ways other than financial to be sure. Matter of fact the most wonderful payment Luther Allison could have possible received was when he and his son Bernard were on stage together some three months before Luther's death (and he knew then that he was dying of cancer and that this would be his last big concert) and Luther and his son jammed together. Bernard ad-libbed the line "And I want to be a blues player like my daddy ..." That pretty much brought the house down and Alligator captured it too. And remember that they are ALL up there in Musician's Heaven playing in the most monster jam of Bluesmen you can imagine. I don't know about you, but I can't wait to die so I can hear them all again.
What makes you think you'll be able to hear anything after you die?
not long enough
:dancingbanana_2:
Too long :arghhh:
slow start, but got better...and better
Sweet, delicious cow bell... :hungry:
Astonishing version: no efford to interprete the song in an originally way can be heard. Yet the interpretation has its own life, due the personality of the musicians.
maLeFunKtion wrote:
Granted you could probably complete a long-haul flight in the time it takes this song to reach IT'S destination, but by heck isn't the journey just worth it? :dancingbanana: :bananajam: :guitarist: :drummer:
HA! Good one!! Yes indeed, well worth the ride!
tony620d wrote:
his sound is lifted directly from luther allison. maybe he deserved to loose his own rights because they were never fully his to begin with ?
Yes, I've heard that too. Luther played a lot of music which he inherited one way or the other. Like Hound Dog Taylor, Luther was simply a great Bluesman who played what he felt like needed playing and added his own unique style to it. Same-o with R.L. Burnside and his Toasting. No musician deserves to lose rights to their artistry. Luther was repaid in ways other than financial to be sure. Matter of fact the most wonderful payment Luther Allison could have possible received was when he and his son Bernard were on stage together some three months before Luther's death (and he knew then that he was dying of cancer and that this would be his last big concert) and Luther and his son jammed together. Bernard ad-libbed the line "And I want to be a blues player like my daddy ..." That pretty much brought the house down and Alligator captured it too. And remember that they are ALL up there in Musician's Heaven playing in the most monster jam of Bluesmen you can imagine. I don't know about you, but I can't wait to die so I can hear them all again.
ArbiterOfGoodTaste wrote:
I hoid it through the grapevine!
:high-five: and it always makes me think of Bugs Bunny such a great version (shut it, haters!)
olsaltybastard wrote:
I'm getting paid $34 an hour to play air guitar to this song!!
Guess it's time for the pink slip, eh?
DEAR GOD, PLEASE END.. :pray: