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Toots & The Maytals — (I've Got) Dreams To Remember
Album: Toots In Memphis
Avg rating:
6.4

Your rating:
Total ratings: 612









Released: 1988
Length: 3:46
Plays (last 30 days): 2
I've got dreams, dreams to remember
I've got dreams, dreams to remember

Honey, I saw you there last night
Another man's arms holding you tight
Nobody knows what I feel inside
All I know, I walked away and cried

I've got dreams
Dreams to remember
Listen to me
(I've got dreams)
rough dreams
(dreams to remember)

I know you said he was just a friend
But I saw him kiss you again and again
These eyes of mine, they don't fool me
Why did he hold you so tenderly?

I've got dreams
Dreams to remember
Listen, honey
(I've got dreams)
rough dreams
(dreams to remember)

I still want you to stay
I still love you anyway
I don't want you to ever leave
Girl, you just satisfy me, ooh-wee

I know you said he was just a friend
But I saw you kiss him again and again
These eyes of mine, they don't fool me
Why did he hold you so tenderly?

I've got dreams
Dreams to remember
Listen to me, mama
(I've got dreams)
bad dreams,
rough dreams,
(dreams to remember)

Don't make me suffer, don't let me
(I've got dreams, dreams, dreams to remember)
rough dreams,
bad dreams,
rough dreams
Comments (46)add comment
RIP Toots
R.I.P. Toots 1942-2020
RIP Toots.  Pressure Drop still one of my automatic smile songs.
 unclehud wrote:

Yes.  The narrator is hopelessly in love with a bad woman.  (Did I get it right?)
 
Come to think of it, that about describes the majority of rock and blues songs out there....
 macadavy wrote:
Is no one listening to the words of this song?
 
Yes.  The narrator is hopelessly in love with a bad woman.  (Did I get it right?)
Is no one listening to the words of this song?
My rating 8 down to 6  
7 -> 8
Interesting that the ever popular bass drum beat on the upbeat of a measure creates the essence of what we know of this genre of music. As interesting as this is...I'm still done with anything 'reggae' after the first 20 or 30 seconds.
 EniwaMan wrote:

It kind of depends on how you define "reggae."  Desmond Dekker's "Israelites" came out in 1968.  From Wikipedia:

...

Later in the Wikipedia article, the song is described as ska, not reggae.  To many people, they are two sides of the same coin, or at least close cousins.  Perhaps, mother and child?

 
It also depends on who you ask.  Ska and rocksteady preceded reggae.  
This song is a 5 but i gave it a 7 because this is a solid album thanks RP for making me discover more everyday
I love {#Dancingbanana_2} 
It swings baby, and I believe him.
nope, sorry, can't do it

i want Otis 
 btt wrote:
Great song .
It would be nice to hear Delbert McClinton`s version on RP as well . 

 
Upload it! The couple of Delbert songs I've uploaded have gotten "sorried."
Great song .
It would be nice to hear Delbert McClinton`s version on RP as well . 
love, love, LOVE Toots and The Maytals. luckily, they love Liverpool (where I live, in England) and come and play here at least once every tour. Awesome. 
Toots! 

More Toots please.



 apd wrote:

Did that predate Paul Simon's "Mother and Child Reunion"? I think that was 1972, and I'd heard that was the first international reggae hit. (Though not by a Jamaican artist, of course).
 
It kind of depends on how you define "reggae."  Desmond Dekker's "Israelites" came out in 1968.  From Wikipedia:

"Israelites" is a song written by Desmond Dekker and Leslie Kong that became a hit for Dekker's group, Desmond Dekker & The Aces.<1>Although few could understand all the lyrics, the single was the first UK reggae number one and the first to reach the US top ten.<2> It combined the Rastafarian religion with rudeboy concerns,<3> to make what has been described as a "timeless masterpiece that knew no boundaries". 

Later in the Wikipedia article, the song is described as ska, not reggae.  To many people, they are two sides of the same coin, or at least close cousins.  Perhaps, mother and child?

Again, from Wikipedia:

It was one of the first ska songs to become an international hit, despite Dekker's strong Jamaican accent which made his lyrics difficult to understand for audiences outside Jamaica. In 1969 it reached the Top Ten in the United States, peaking at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. It hit number one in the United Kingdom,<5> Netherlands, Jamaica, South Africa,CanadaSweden and West Germany

 secretsauce wrote:
Ah yes ... this brings up a very weird memory.

The first time I ever heard the 'Toots in Memphis' CD (which this is from) was through the drug-induced haze of having a tooth removed.  My dentist recommended it, and I put on the headphones as he started the gas.  

A long lovely happy drifting flying blissful trip, with sounds somewhere in the distance of drilling, tapping, and cranking pliers, hands on my face for leverage (it was a deep tooth) ... and it was all off in the distance somewhere as I listened to Toots sing Motown classics.

One of the more interesting experiences of my life.
 
Hmm. This is your experience? Tip of the hat to you. 

I was thinking it would be in more in line with the lines of the song.  A lost love would be the first to come to mind.

A dental experience?  I have to think about that for a while. 

I worked with Toots for about a year in the late eighties.  Him and his band always gave an amazing performance and gave the audience a great show.
Nice Sax
...very relaxing flow this morning...
Ah yes ... this brings up a very weird memory.

The first time I ever heard the 'Toots in Memphis' CD (which this is from) was through the drug-induced haze of having a tooth removed.  My dentist recommended it, and I put on the headphones as he started the gas.  

A long lovely happy drifting flying blissful trip, with sounds somewhere in the distance of drilling, tapping, and cranking pliers, hands on my face for leverage (it was a deep tooth) ... and it was all off in the distance somewhere as I listened to Toots sing Motown classics.

One of the more interesting experiences of my life.
 apd wrote:

Did that predate Paul Simon's "Mother and Child Reunion"? I think that was 1972, and I'd heard that was the first international reggae hit. (Though not by a Jamaican artist, of course).

 
Hard to say unless we can find out what month each album ('I Can See Clearly Now' & 'Paul Simon') was released.  It appears both Nash and Simon were in Kingston, Jamaica in 1972 and there is some interesting intermingling:

""Mother and Child Reunion" is a song written by Paul Simon, and is on his eponymous debut album. It was released as a single in 1972, and reached #4 on the American charts.

The song was one of the earliest by a white musician to feature prominent elements of reggae. The name has its origin in a chicken and egg dish called "Mother and Child Reunion" that Paul Simon saw on a Chinese restaurant's menu. The song has been interpreted as a meditation on death, either the death of a mother by suicide, or the death of a child, and the hope of reunification in the afterlife. The references to a "strange and mournful day" may support this theory.

The song was recorded in Jamaica with singer Jimmy Cliff's backing group; guitarist Hucks (often "Hux") Brown and bassist Jackie Jackson were also long-time members of reggae legends Toots and the Maytals. Cissy Houston, mother of singer Whitney Houston, sang background vocals on this song."

 

""I Can See Clearly Now" is a song written and recorded by Johnny Nash. It was a single from the album of the same name and achieved success in the United States and the United Kingdom when it was released in 1972. It was covered by many artists throughout the years, including a 1993 hit version by Jimmy Cliff.
The song's extremely optimistic lyrics, an unabashedly upbeat tempo in D-major, and a quick, sustained midway crescendo, contrasted against minor key hits popular at the same time, such as "Nights In White Satin," "I'll Be Around," "Witchy Woman," and "Papa Was A Rolling Stone." Nash thus joined Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, and Rick Nelson as 1950s rock pioneers each having his last Hot 100 top 10 success in late 1972.
It is a common misconception that the song was written and/or performed by Bob Marley, possibly based on the fact that The Wailers were the backing band on Nash's original recording. Marley wrote Nash's next single, "Stir It Up".
After making modest chart advances for a month, the RIAA certified gold single unexpectedly took only two weeks to vault from #20 to #5 to #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 4, 1972, remaining atop this chart for four weeks, and also spent four weeks atop the adult contemporary chart."

~ Wikipedia


They're both great tunes, but as to which came first
it looks like a case of the chicken or the egg?
Your guess is as good as mine! 
BTW - Both songs (by the original artists) are on RP's playlist.
Bill, what are you waiting for?  Back to back segue for historical purposes! {#Smile}

{EDIT}  After posting I realized I might already have answered the chicken & egg question posed above in another post, again thanks to Wikipedia (do donate to their current fundraising campaign:  www.wikipedia.org):
Johnny Nash: " He was also the first non-Jamaican to record reggae music in Kingston, Jamaica.
Besides "I Can See Clearly Now," Nash recorded several hits in Jamaica, where he travelled in early 1968, as his girlfriend had family links with local TV and radio host and novel writer Neville Willoughby. Nash planned to try breaking the local rocksteady sound in the USA. Willoughby introduced him to a local struggling vocal group, The Wailers. Members Bob Marley, Rita Marley and Peter Tosh introduced him to the local scene. Nash signed all three to an exclusive publishing and recording contract with his JAD label and financed some of their recordings, some with Byron Lee's Dragonaires and some with other local musicians such as Jackie Jackson and Lynn Taitt.
The "I Can See Clearly Now" album includes four original Marley compositions published by JAD: « Guava Jelly », « Comma Comma » « You Poured Sugar On Me » and the follow-up hit « Stir It Up ». « There Are More Questions Than Answers » was a third hit single taken from the album." ~ Wikipedia

And the rest, as they say, is history...  {#Good-vibes}




Otis!....forever   -  8.
macadavy wrote:
1972: Johnny Nash, Memphis soul singer, goes to Jamaica and records a landmark album, I Can See Clearly Now, which brings reggae music to a world audience. This is just Toots' payback - Memphis soul wit' a reggae beat. Like the man said: reggae got soul! :good-vibes:
Did that predate Paul Simon's "Mother and Child Reunion"? I think that was 1972, and I'd heard that was the first international reggae hit. (Though not by a Jamaican artist, of course).
Yes 1 vote dropped the score of this! Down with reggae!
1972: Johnny Nash, Memphis soul singer, goes to Jamaica and records a landmark album, I Can See Clearly Now, which brings reggae music to a world audience. This is just Toots' payback - Memphis soul wit' a reggae beat. Like the man said: reggae got soul! :good-vibes:
The sax in the bridge is a nice touch. :) Edit: and I like the little outburst at the end. Really nice cover.
wow... really like this!
I love em...
Oh Ya....This delivers quite well.... :)
Can the version from \"Dream Alittle Dream\" leave my head forever please? This cover is very nice. :sunny:
Great cover Bill!
Great song, great version!
dionysius wrote:
(Skanking emoticon:) :bananasplit: Toots doing Otis? Memphis goes Jamaican? Reggae got soul, indeed.
:lol: Reggae got soul, indeed!
Maybe I'm just not in the mood, but this is getting a 1.
This was orignally on the excellent "Toots in Memphis" album. Toots was backed up mostly by Memphis music1ans. It was more like a Toots solo album, not really a Maytals album.
Nice interpretation of a classic! :bananajam:
(Skanking emoticon:) :bananasplit: Toots doing Otis? Memphis goes Jamaican? Reggae got soul, indeed.
As good as it gets. Sublime. No arguments thankyou.
A happy sunny afternoon tune.
Otis "my main man" would be proud!
Toots can do NO wrong in my book. I loove, looove, looove him! (and the Maytals too).
I love this song, but maybe not this version of it.