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The Doors — Strange Days
Album: Strange Days
Avg rating:
7.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1515









Released: 1967
Length: 3:04
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Strange days have found us
Strange days have tracked us down
They're going to destroy
Our casual joys
We shall go on playing or find a new town
Yeah!

Strange eyes fill strange rooms
Voices will signal their tired end
The hostess is grinning
Her guests sleep from sinning
Hear me talk of sin and you know this is it
Yeah!

Strange days have found us
And through their strange hours, we linger alone
Bodies confused
Memories misused
As we run from the day to a strange night of stone
Comments (139)add comment
 ThePoose wrote:
 The Doors had several electric bass players over the years--not as a band member, but as session musicians.

They had a bass player: Ray played a Fender Rhodes piano bass with his left hand to fill in the bottom. His right hand played the organ. The Doors used a "real" bass player toward the end.

Typesbad wrote:
That is some pretty active and upfront bass for a band without a bass player.

Damn! I should know better by now to read the comments before making a redundant one of my own

 

 

Gotta do the Hippie Head Nod to this ...

rating = 10, and it grooves really tightly, Mr. Crosby.
 Proclivities wrote:

They had bass players on certain songs, like this one - "Peace Frog" certainly swings.
 David Crosby's quote has a bit of irony: "I didn’t like that band, though, which kind of shaded onto him because they never had a bass player. So they never swung. That band never swung. Ever."
 What would David Crosby know about music "swinging", given all that Laurel Canyon, campfire-sing-along, 'Kumbaya', granola crap that he and his buddies made?  Sure, many people may love that music but none of that stuff "swung".
 

To dismiss David Crosby (& associates) as 'campfire-sing-along' is total nonsense.
 dggeek wrote:

Nah.  These guys are way before my time, but it didn't affect how awesome they are for me.

 

Occurs to me for the first time, that The Doors didn't have a bassist.
-
I searched it:
Session musician Douglass Lubahn played bass during the recording of the STRANGE DAYS Album.
I think it's time to retire this one.  Yawn.
The Doors.  Such a topic of controversy.  The comments about grooving, is just one artist perception.  You would not say this about Tchaikovsky.  Like any great new idea, there's nothing to compare it with. That's art.
Lotta bass in this one. For a band that credited no bass player. Yeah.
Makes me wanna get strange on a Saturday morning
 janac13 wrote:
I love Crosby's comment the other day about the Doors... "They never had a bass player so they never grooved".

I think that the Doors never had to groove to make outstanding music.

Oh and I like the quote mostly because of what says about bass players.
 
And yet this song has a very prominent bass guitar, played by Doug Lubahn. The song after this one, "Your Lost Little Girl" is predominantly bass guitar.
I read a while back that the little guy on the cover of this album died last year.  Michu Meszaros was his name.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michu_Meszaros
 jagdriver wrote:
Saw them in 1968 at Cobo Arena in Detroit. The Crazy World of Arthur Brown (with Carl Palmer on drums) stole the show.

 

 
IIRC, I have a copy of that show.  It was done as a radio simulcast.  Very good quality and a quality performance.
keyboard sounds like the circus is coming to town, not a good thing
 janac13 wrote:
I love Crosby's comment the other day about the Doors... "They never had a bass player so they never grooved".

I think that the Doors never had to groove to make outstanding music.

Oh and I like the quote mostly because of what says about bass players.
 
They had bass players on certain songs, like this one - "Peace Frog" certainly swings.
 David Crosby's quote has a bit of irony: "I didn’t like that band, though, which kind of shaded onto him because they never had a bass player. So they never swung. That band never swung. Ever."
 What would David Crosby know about music "swinging", given all that Laurel Canyon, campfire-sing-along, 'Kumbaya', granola crap that he and his buddies made?  Sure, many people may love that music but none of that stuff "swung".
 treatment_bound wrote:

Awesome post and POSTER!  Didn't know Carl Palmer was in CWOAB.

 

 Here's his Wiki snippet on that gig:

 

>>The Crazy World of Arthur BrownDrachen Theaker was the original drummer for The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, founded by Arthur Brown, and played on the band's eponymous album, including the song Fire. However, Theaker's behavioral problems led to conflicts and hostility from other band members, especially with keyboardist Vincent Crane, and Theaker abruptly left the band during a U.S. tour in 1969. Carl Palmer was quickly recruited as a replacement and became a permanent band member.

 

Do you remember anything about that 5/11/68 Doors show (one MONTH after MLK was assassinated) including Jagged Edge and/or James Cotton 45+ YEARS LATER?  I sure hope Jim was on BEST BEHAVIOR!

 
This is the show I went to in Philly 1969, 2nd show.  A strange, spooky kinda fun night in one of the baddest parts of Philly.  Senior year of high school.


STRANGE DAYS INDEED in the US now! Wow, but it still feels liberating somehow to recall the many wild, moonlit nights out in cars listening to this, rolling stoned, pulling up in verdant parks, chugging the suds, tossing the Frizz; our heads just floating in the breeze...
NeuroGeek wrote:
Particularly relevant today. *sigh*


Chi_Editrix wrote:
I feels you.


Me too. {#Yes} {#Eyes} {#Beat} {#Evil} {#Razz} and {#Sick}
{#Flamed} my favorite doors album and the hostess is grinning !
 NeuroGeek wrote:
Particularly relevant today. *sigh*

 
I feels you.
Particularly relevant today. *sigh*
I love Crosby's comment the other day about the Doors... "They never had a bass player so they never grooved". I think that the Doors never had to groove to make outstanding music. Oh and I like the quote mostly because of what says about bass players.
Never imagined in the day that I'd be hearing this played again a half century later. I mean, it was cool at the time but never thought it would stand the test of it.
Hurray for Ray! 
Genius! Inspired! Unbridled enthusiasm for unbraked, unabashed artistic and creative expression of and for the miracle that Music is...
There are people who say they 'don't get' The Doors; they're a LOT like people who 'don't get' U2, Pink Floyd, whatever... I say, WTF?
 zepher wrote:

Classic Doors.....

Psychedelic rock influenced the creation of psychedelic pop and psychedelic soul. It also bridged the transition from early blues- and folk music-based rock to progressive rock, glam rock, hard rock and as a result influenced the development of sub-genres such as heavy metal. Since the late 1970s it has been revived in various forms of neo-psychedelia.

 
nice pic....I'm reliving some bad moments because of it...but they don't seem so bad now
 countyman wrote:

Over-rated in my opinion.

 

I agree 100%...the Flaming Lips are overrated


Always top of the Pops for me. People complain about Jimbo being pretentious, ain't most music? 
 They had a bass player: Ray played a Fender Rhodes piano bass with his left hand to fill in the bottom. His right hand played the organ. The Doors used a "real" bass player toward the end.

Typesbad wrote:
That is some pretty active and upfront bass for a band without a bass player.

Damn! I should know better by now to read the comments before making a redundant one of my own

 

Strange days indeed -- strange days indeed. (Courtesy J Lennon); Well, it's certainly the case recently here in Blighty. pxd
     Then God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it, because in it He rested from all His work which God had created and made.
 Chrisjea wrote:
Ah the good old days, senior in high school awaiting graduation and draft notice.  Thanks and a hat tip to LBJ and Nixon

 
i always assumed that the Doors popularity was the sex appeal of Morrison, at best they bored me
LBJ and Nixon? crazy dayz indeed
in 1972 i turned 18 and they raised the draft age to 19
the next year when i turned 19 they stopped drafting
Windsor, Ontario was across the river, i was making plans
 
artists
 countyman wrote:

Over-rated in my opinion.

 

Guess you had to "be there".  Typically, I shut the door on the Doors when they arrive on the scene.
 squidish wrote:
Doors taught Flaming Lips everything they know...

 
Over-rated in my opinion.
Ah the good old days, senior in high school awaiting graduation and draft notice.  Thanks and a hat tip to LBJ and Nixon
 jagdriver wrote:
Saw them in 1968 at Cobo Arena in Detroit. The Crazy World of Arthur Brown (with Carl Palmer on drums) stole the show.

 

 
Awesome post and POSTER!  Didn't know Carl Palmer was in CWOAB.

 

 Here's his Wiki snippet on that gig:

 

>>The Crazy World of Arthur BrownDrachen Theaker was the original drummer for The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, founded by Arthur Brown, and played on the band's eponymous album, including the song Fire. However, Theaker's behavioral problems led to conflicts and hostility from other band members, especially with keyboardist Vincent Crane, and Theaker abruptly left the band during a U.S. tour in 1969. Carl Palmer was quickly recruited as a replacement and became a permanent band member.

 

Do you remember anything about that 5/11/68 Doors show (one MONTH after MLK was assassinated) including Jagged Edge and/or James Cotton 45+ YEARS LATER?  I sure hope Jim was on BEST BEHAVIOR!

 

 

 


Saw them in 1968 at Cobo Arena in Detroit. The Crazy World of Arthur Brown (with Carl Palmer on drums) stole the show.

 
 zepher wrote:

Classic Doors.....

Psychedelic rock influenced the creation of psychedelic pop and psychedelic soul. It also bridged the transition from early blues- and folk music-based rock to progressive rock, glam rock, hard rock and as a result influenced the development of sub-genres such as heavy metal. Since the late 1970s it has been revived in various forms of neo-psychedelia.

 
...so cool....and this track has probably  the best riffs I know...
 squidish wrote:
Doors taught Flaming Lips everything they know...

 
No, not really.  They have dozens of influences and The Doors are probably pretty low on that list.
Classic!  Listened to when I was a kid!  This album is fantastic!
 
 rascal wrote:
bass playing/recording /mixing  second to none

 
👍
Anyone else hear the intro and think of British TV hospital drama?
Just watched the Doors live at the Hollywood Bowl 1968 last night. Time to drop some Orange Sunshine
That is some pretty active and upfront bass for a band without a bass player.

Damn! I should know better by now to read the comments before making a redundant one of my own

Classic Doors.....

Psychedelic rock influenced the creation of psychedelic pop and psychedelic soul. It also bridged the transition from early blues- and folk music-based rock to progressive rock, glam rock, hard rock and as a result influenced the development of sub-genres such as heavy metal. Since the late 1970s it has been revived in various forms of neo-psychedelia.


Doors taught Flaming Lips everything they know...
That album cover... I shall now have nightmares.
bass playing/recording /mixing  second to none
Amazing album, epic album cover art,...Everytime I listen to them I fly over  Vietnam in a Olive green Heli,...don't know why though,... ;)
 actusreus wrote:
I can't really say that I am a Doors fan, but the more time that passes the more I appreciate their artistry. True lasting power.
 
Their sound is a lot less dated than many of their contemporaries--much better production and recording quality.

Haven't listened to this album in a long time, but years ago it struck me that the best parts of it were leftovers from the first album and the rest was filler. 

Everybody in my churches loves this song...
 
They just don't make album cover like they used to...........................
 kaybee wrote:
I see Ray's aged well!



 
Well, I guess in retrospect, Ray aged well until at least July 2012.  Cancer's a bitch!  Sorry to see him go, and glad he left us some great music.
Rest in peace, Ray. Thank you for the joy and magic your music has brought my life over the years. See you in heaven.
R.I.P. Ray. Thanks for your contribution to my musical happy space.
See you on the other side Ray.
 Narg wrote:
I think you had to be there for this one.....

 
Not true sir! I was born in 1976 and I freaking love this song! {#Bananapiano}
Happy memories..!
 calypsus_1 wrote:




  I see Ray's aged well!


Yeah!
I think you had to be there for this one.....
 haretic wrote:
Silversun Pickups "Three Seed" into The Doors "Strange Days:" yet another seamless segue from the Master!     {#Meditate}  

 
Still works a year and a half later. 

sajitjacob wrote:
Looking at that album cover...the ending to "The Prisoner" suddenly all makes sense.
 
Ummm...really? The one with the "gorilla" getting chased around while someone is singing "Dem bones dem bones dem bones dem dry bones"? 'Cause that scared the crap outta me as a kid and puzzled me as an adult.

On a snarky note: Dear Mittens, I am very sorry you lost the election. Perhaps that underwear isn't so magical after all. Seamus the Irish Setter is laughing from atop The Station Wagon in the Sky.  
String of memories, days and nights when this was playing... What a journey with this in the soundtrack... What a journey.
This song has aged extremely well!! Title track off of their best lp.
Still enjoy the Doors but this one has not aged that well.

RAY MANZAREK AND ROBBY KRIEGER OF THE DOORS © Elena Di Vincenzo by (Miss) *Elena Di Vincenzo*
Elena Di Vincenzo
https://www.flickr.com/photos/misslaneghina/

Ray Manzarek and Robby Krieger of the Doors live @ ippodromo del Galoppo
8 Luglio 2012
Milano
(C) Elena Di Vincenzo

This photo was taken on July 8, 2012.

Copyright All rights reserved



Looking at that album cover...the ending to "The Prisoner" suddenly all makes sense.
Surely Tommy James has not fared as well as they gentleman sans Jim.  Generation after generation of youth distinguish the Doors as one of the greatest and most favorite groups. 
Thanks for playing this song. Love it. Strange Days is the Doors best album.
 unclehud wrote:
This is rock and roll?  Why, of course it is!  

I love how the 'rock and roll' label embraces so much — Rolling Stones and King Crimson and Elvis Presley and Elvis Costello and Clapton and Doors and Scorpions and Captain Beyond and Led Zeppelin and Ozzie and Humble Pie and Little Feat and Frank Zappa and Abba and Wishbone Ash and They Might Be Giants and .... 

Ok, maybe not TMBG.
 
I'd probably have left ABBA out (apart from the Scorpions). But maybe I'm too old school on that one.
This is rock and roll?  Why, of course it is!  

I love how the 'rock and roll' label embraces so much — Rolling Stones and King Crimson and Elvis Presley and Elvis Costello and Clapton and Doors and Scorpions and Captain Beyond and Led Zeppelin and Ozzie and Humble Pie and Little Feat and Frank Zappa and Abba and Wishbone Ash and They Might Be Giants and .... 

Ok, maybe not TMBG.


Yes it is a strange day, today.

Timely for the mood.
 dsd wrote:
Now THAT's an album cover !
 
It's sooooo PC! {#Bananapiano}
Now THAT's an album cover !
{#Hungry} LUNCH TIME JIMBOOOOOO
*I* can't really say I'm a Doors fan, but the more RP plays that's not @$)&)*&! "Riders on the Storm" the more I adore them. I swear to God Almighty, broadcast radio *is* the Antichrist.
I can't really say that I am a Doors fan, but the more time that passes the more I appreciate their artistry. True lasting power.
Silversun Pickups "Three Seed" into The Doors "Strange Days:" yet another seamless segue from the Master!     {#Meditate}  

(Side note: Chrome is a very fast browser, but it seems to demand more resources (like RAM) to achieve its speediness. This causes disruptions in the flow of the the audio stream from RP on my old computer. Chrome also does not work well with icons, like smileys).

martinc wrote:
They had no bass player
Au contraire, martinc! Ray played the bass line with his left hand on a Keys Bass.

from https://www.answerbag.com/q_view/508467
While the band never recruited a full-time bassist, it called upon some of Los Angeles's finest studio musicians to create their albums finishing with Elvis Presley bassist Jerry Scheff who brought a Memphis vibe to the band's final offering, L.A. Woman. Here are the guts they used and the albums that they appear on:

The Doors - Larry Knechtal
Strange Days - Doug Lubahn
Waiting for the Sun - Doug Lubahn, Kerry Magness & Leroy Vinegar.
The Soft Parade - Harvey Brooks
Morrison Hotel - Ray Neapolitan & Lonnie Mack
L.A. Woman - Jerry Scheff
Other Voices - Jack Conrad, Ray Neopolitan & Willie Ruff
Full Circle - Chris Ethridge, Jack Conrad, Charles Larkey & Leland Sklar.


 Businessgypsy wrote:
and their bass player (at least on the first album)!
 
They had no bass player
nice valentinesday!

YEAH!
kcar wrote:
...What separates The Doors from their fellow psychedelic/mystical contemporaries was their polished, produced sound...
and their bass player (at least on the first album)!

 toterola wrote:

Your original post: "mmm....I think that Morrison were a little bit overrated.... cool guy but don't think he diserved all his succes"...(sic)

You cast derision on a man who was, first and foremost, an artist. He wasn't perfect, but he gave of himself for his art. He was as crazy as a peach orchard boar, but at least he wasn't BORING. There's a lot to be said for that. And as for "hating" being a fad term, I believe it's an accepted part of the vernacular. Sort of like the term "spell check".

Oh yeah, here's a little something for you: "If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself. What isn't part of ourselves doesn't disturb us" -Hermann Hesse
 

No, Jim Morrison wasn't boring LOL, although I think a lot of his Lizard King mystique came from the band's first two albums. I don't know many bands from the mid-late 60s that sounded like The Doors, esp. as they sounded on the first two records. Love comes close (apparently Morrison and Manzarek idolized Love early on, dreamed of becoming as big as they were in LA). 

What separates The Doors from their fellow psychedelic/mystical contemporaries was their polished, produced sound. Groups like Blue Cheer and Love and Moby Grape sound amateurish now, but the Doors' sound still holds up—clear vocals, no tinny sound, well mixed tracks. Yes, you can place them in the 60s but most of their records have a professional sound that rivals the Beatles' later records. 
To think of Morrison, think of Marcel Proust... Our  American Proust...
To listen to the Doors... Just enjoy the music... 43 years later and it still holds an audience.
Can many say that...  Just enjoy the music... Good music and good flow is hard to find. Thanks RP
wow Bill, that seemless transition from Peter Gabriel to Rodrigo Y Gabriela to the Doors was breathtaking. 10!
 LowPhreak wrote:


Keep on using words like "hating" when they're out of place, for the sake of jumping onto the latest "in" speech fad. I'm sure you'll have an equally "huge" or "epic" reply.
{#Rolleyes} 
 
Your original post: "mmm....I think that Morrison were a little bit overrated.... cool guy but don't think he diserved all his succes"...(sic)

You cast derision on a man who was, first and foremost, an artist. He wasn't perfect, but he gave of himself for his art. He was as crazy as a peach orchard boar, but at least he wasn't BORING. There's a lot to be said for that. And as for "hating" being a fad term, I believe it's an accepted part of the vernacular. Sort of like the term "spell check".

Oh yeah, here's a little something for you: "If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself. What isn't part of ourselves doesn't disturb us" -Hermann Hesse
Lizard King
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Different song, but close enough for rock & roll.  ; )


Just saw that.  My bad.

 
Thanks for the gimme ...

 kurtster wrote:
No one remembers your name ...
Faces come out of the rain ...
Read it as poetry, it stands up all by itself,
Then toss in some hooky riffs and a cheesy organ.
Nice.
 
Different song, but close enough for rock & roll.  ; )

 AdyMiles wrote:
nothing special
 
No, you can't be...

 jimbaca wrote:

Another case of "you had to be there," which I was.  Love the Doors.


 
Nah.  These guys are way before my time, but it didn't affect how awesome they are for me.

 toterola wrote:

Keep on hating. We'll be here next time you're around. {#Wave}
 

Keep on using words like "hating" when they're out of place, for the sake of jumping onto the latest "in" speech fad. I'm sure you'll have an equally "huge" or "epic" reply.
{#Rolleyes} 


Another case of "you had to be there," which I was.  Love the Doors.


This LP remained on my turntable for long periods "when I was back there in seminary school."
 kurtster wrote:
No one remembers your name ...

Faces come out of the rain ...

Read it as poetry, it stands up all by itself,

Then toss in some hooky riffs and a cheesy organ.

Nice.
 
{#High-five}

No one remembers your name ...

Faces come out of the rain ...

Read it as poetry, it stands up all by itself,

Then toss in some hooky riffs and a cheesy organ.

Nice.
 Hannio wrote:


Word.  This album was mind-blowing when it was released.  There really wasn't anything comparable at the time.
 
     {#Yes} ,,,and today ??  Strange days indeed !
      Some one ..where are the "New Doors" !?
     (i would like to get out of here !) Oh,,and Merry X'mas !xmas-smiley-4605

This here is what I call rock and roll. I know it ain't for everybody, and it never has been. There were people back in the day who made fun of the organ music, the literary lyrics, the darkness, and Jim's antics. I'll say the same thing now that I said then: "Take a hike!" {#Wave}
yes when we go from a pianist covering the doors right into the doors....strange days have found us
 EssexTex wrote:
Sadly lost in translation.....a grotesque victim of itself....an imploding parody....morbidly obese in its format.
 
. . . but enough about Rosie O'donnell.

Sadly lost in translation.....a grotesque victim of itself....an imploding parody....morbidly obese in its format.

 michaelgmitchell wrote:
Some music is just too outdated to be outdated. Bleh.
  I don't know about Canada. But in the US: "teabaggers", playing "cornhole" and congressmen defending banks and insurance companies....WTF?

 mgkiwi wrote:
Strange band Doors - People really big them up but this, this is dated shyte - They have done some classics but not everything they did can be classified as good.
 
I agree,  Everything they did can't be classified as good, because everything they did is either GREAT or TIMELESS.  Everything they did is also not mainstream.
  and that album cover is about as repulsive a thing as I can imagine. 

But, it's just me... I have no qualms against anyone who like the Doors.
Wonderful keyboard driven track!
Now THIS is Doors music!  Strange days indeed ...
Some music is just too outdated to be outdated. Bleh.
Laid the foundation for later love of sick-and-twisted rock a la punk. Grateful for their early influence on my musical taste, but not really much of a fan anymore.
nothing special
Great song. Doors is (are) all great. I remeber having Morrison´s such a cute poster hanging over my bed when I was 16 (the only poster in my room I have ever had :-)
 justlistening wrote:
Tedious, unengaging and too persistent in its blandness.
 
Plus it's tedious.
 Queue wrote:
Do I hear a real bass on this track?  (Not just Ray on the pedals)
I suspect that you are hearing an actual electric bass. I saw a program about the making of the first Doors album and the group did have a session bassist come in to produce the real low end that was needed for those songs.


 exciter76 wrote:
mmm....I think that Morrison were a little bit overrated.... cool guy but don't think he diserved all his succes...
 
Keep on hating. We'll be here next time you're around. {#Wave}
Good song, great album.
There is still nothing that comes close to sounding like this.
walked past that album cover place again this morning...
1967
 Not_Dark_Yet wrote:
When The Doors were around they were just sooooooh far ahead of their time, and in some ways they still are. 

 

Word.  This album was mind-blowing when it was released.  There really wasn't anything comparable at the time.