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Bob Dylan — Political World
Album: Oh Mercy
Avg rating:
5.7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 99









Released: 1989
Length: 3:30
Plays (last 30 days): 0
We live in a political world,
Love don't have any place.
We're living in times where men commit crimes
And crime don't have a face

We live in a political world,
Icicles hanging down,
Wedding bells ring and angels sing,
And clouds cover up the ground.

We live in a political world,
Wisdom is thrown into jail,
It rots in a cell, misguided as hell
Leaving no one to pick up a trail.

We live in a political world
Where mercy walks the plank,
Life is in mirrors, death disappears
Up the steps into the nearest bank.

We live in a political world
Where courage is a thing of the past
Houses are haunted, children are unwanted
The next day could be your last.

We live in a political world.
The one we can see and can feel
But there's no one to check, it's all a stacked deck,
We all know for sure that it's real.

We live in a political world
The cities of a lonesome fear,
Little by little you turn in the middle
But you're never sure why you're here.

We live in a political world
Under the microscope,
You can travel anywhere and hang yourself there
You always got more than enough rope.

We live in a political world
Turning and a'thrashing about,
As soon as you're awake, you're trained to take
What looks like the easy way out.

We live in a political world
Where peace is not welcome at all,
It's turned away from the door to wander some more
Or put up against the wall.

We live in a political world
Everything is hers or his,
Climb into the frame and shout God's name
But you're never sure what it is.
Comments (27)add comment
@westslope
I'm not entirely convinced that the 9th is best starting point for those with classic music-phobia. Peer Gynt maybe?

A good suggestion, or Dvorak's 9th, actually. 

heliosweb wrote:
...... As to Beethoven... he wasn't deaf until later in life. His true musical genius is completely evident if you take into consideration that he wrote the 9th Symphony when he was deaf. That's one of the most astounding and moving pieces of music I've ever heard. Truly magnificent.
I agree absolutely. I'm not entirely convinced that the 9th is best starting point for those with classic music-phobia. Peer Gynt maybe?
Shows that true musical genius involves more that just an "ear" for music; it's in the heart, soul and mind. And he had one heck of a mind. ..... steve
I'm sure that there has been a tonne of ink spilt on this subject but I would guess that Beethoven simply 'visualized' the music the way the truly mathematically skilled can explore gradients for n-rank matrices on the little TV screen in their head.
A great follow-on to "World Leader Pretend"...moving into the election night segment, Bill? ;) Really good Dylan tune.
Hmmm... a Dylan tune that I don't necessarily dislike-- less grating than most, thanks to the nice groove and lack of harp. :wink:
heliosweb wrote:
joe1 wrote:
You have a couple of valid points but you fail at all to address the Shalamar influence which, in my opinion, may eclipse even that of the B52's... Beethoven?......wasn't he deaf?....sums it up really......
OK, I'm an old fart (if 48 qualifies), and I'm not familiar with Shalamar ("Shalimar" is the usual spelling). Who the heck are they? Really significant, musical history-wise, I guess... :-k As to Beethoven... he wasn't deaf until later in life. His true musical genius is completely evident if you take into consideration that he wrote the 9th Symphony when he was deaf. That's one of the most astounding and moving pieces of music I've ever heard. Truly magnificent. Shows that true musical genius involves more that just an "ear" for music; it's in the heart, soul and mind. And he had one heck of a mind. I believe that when he debuted the 9th Symphony, as he was conducting the orchestra and the symphony came to a close, he remained motionless with his back to the audience, not realizing that the audience was on its feet, cheering wildly. One of the musicians had to go to him and turn him around to face the audience so that he could see their applause, as he was unaware of their acclaim of the symphony. He could, however, feel the vibrations of the sound waves coming from the orchestra, and of course knew the symphony by heart. I highly recommend renting Immortal Beloved, an intriguing movie that will certainly lead you to an appreciation of Beethoven's music if you're not already a fan. (That is, unless you've just got a completely closed mind re: classical music.) I must admit, as a "Young Turk" myself eons ago, I really didn't appreciate classical music until one evening when I went for a drive with a few friends, and this quite strange guy parked his van out on the mesa (high plateau), looking out over a stupendous sunset (New Mexico is famous for its sunsets), and started blasting out Beethoven's Ninth with all the doors open. I think it helped that we were "under the influence" of some psychotropics, which helped to open the mind. It was a majestic experience. (My other friend complained bitterly, but I insisted that we listen to the entire symphony). An unforgettable experience. Now, of course, I don't need psychotropics to appreciate the music. :meditate: Here's to musical genius... steve
To second Johray, this is piece of writing that is quite nice. Thanks.
And to think all this time I thought we were living in a material world...
steeler wrote:
LOts of relevancy to . . . right now.
I totally agree! And I love this song, and I'm no old fart. :P
heliosweb wrote:
OK, I'm an old fart (if 48 qualifies), and I'm not familiar with Shalamar ("Shalimar" is the usual spelling). Who the heck are they? Really significant, musical history-wise, I guess... :-k As to Beethoven... he wasn't deaf until later in life. His true musical genius is completely evident if you take into consideration that he wrote the 9th Symphony when he was deaf. That's one of the most astounding and moving pieces of music I've ever heard. Truly magnificent. Shows that true musical genius involves more that just an "ear" for music; it's in the heart, soul and mind. And he had one heck of a mind. I believe that when he debuted the 9th Symphony, as he was conducting the orchestra and the symphony came to a close, he remained motionless with his back to the audience, not realizing that the audience was on its feet, cheering wildly. One of the musicians had to go to him and turn him around to face the audience so that he could see their applause, as he was unaware of their acclaim of the symphony. He could, however, feel the vibrations of the sound waves coming from the orchestra, and of course knew the symphony by heart. I highly recommend renting Immortal Beloved, an intriguing movie that will certainly lead you to an appreciation of Beethoven's music if you're not already a fan. (That is, unless you've just got a completely closed mind re: classical music.) I must admit, as a "Young Turk" myself eons ago, I really didn't appreciate classical music until one evening when I went for a drive with a few friends, and this quite strange guy parked his van out on the mesa (high plateau), looking out over a stupendous sunset (New Mexico is famous for its sunsets), and started blasting out Beethoven's Ninth with all the doors open. I think it helped that we were "under the influence" of some psychotropics, which helped to open the mind. It was a majestic experience. (My other friend complained bitterly, but I insisted that we listen to the entire symphony). An unforgettable experience. Now, of course, I don't need psychotropics to appreciate the music. :meditate: Here's to musical genius... steve
Thanks for sharing this, Steve.
LOts of relevancy to . . . right now.
Go Daniel Lanois!!!!!!!!
I love this album. It has so many great songs on it. Glad RP draws from it regularly.
Oddly enogh....I'm with helliosweb on this one Top work there fella!! Pardon?...
joe1 wrote:
You have a couple of valid points but you fail at all to address the Shalamar influence which, in my opinion, may eclipse even that of the B52's... Beethoven?......wasn't he deaf?....sums it up really......
OK, I'm an old fart (if 48 qualifies), and I'm not familiar with Shalamar ("Shalimar" is the usual spelling). Who the heck are they? Really significant, musical history-wise, I guess... :-k As to Beethoven... he wasn't deaf until later in life. His true musical genius is completely evident if you take into consideration that he wrote the 9th Symphony when he was deaf. That's one of the most astounding and moving pieces of music I've ever heard. Truly magnificent. Shows that true musical genius involves more that just an "ear" for music; it's in the heart, soul and mind. And he had one heck of a mind. I believe that when he debuted the 9th Symphony, as he was conducting the orchestra and the symphony came to a close, he remained motionless with his back to the audience, not realizing that the audience was on its feet, cheering wildly. One of the musicians had to go to him and turn him around to face the audience so that he could see their applause, as he was unaware of their acclaim of the symphony. He could, however, feel the vibrations of the sound waves coming from the orchestra, and of course knew the symphony by heart. I highly recommend renting Immortal Beloved, an intriguing movie that will certainly lead you to an appreciation of Beethoven's music if you're not already a fan. (That is, unless you've just got a completely closed mind re: classical music.) I must admit, as a "Young Turk" myself eons ago, I really didn't appreciate classical music until one evening when I went for a drive with a few friends, and this quite strange guy parked his van out on the mesa (high plateau), looking out over a stupendous sunset (New Mexico is famous for its sunsets), and started blasting out Beethoven's Ninth with all the doors open. I think it helped that we were "under the influence" of some psychotropics, which helped to open the mind. It was a majestic experience. (My other friend complained bitterly, but I insisted that we listen to the entire symphony). An unforgettable experience. Now, of course, I don't need psychotropics to appreciate the music. :meditate: Here's to musical genius... steve
You have a couple of valid points but you fail at all to address the Shalamar influence which, in my opinion, may eclipse even that of the B52's... Beethoven?......wasn't he deaf?....sums it up really......
joe1 wrote:
Pez'...I dare say that you are about 60 and have Dylan posters all over your room?... ... I do have an incredible amount of respect for Shalamar how they changed the musical landscape and musical history, just as early B52's did...
B52's changed the musical landscape and musical history? Oh, pleeeeeeeezzzzzzzzz!!!!!! :roflol: :P :beat: (attempts to beat some sense into his thick skull...) 200 years (+/-) after Beethoven, and 250 years (+/-) after Mozart, they are two figures who are still remembered for changing the musical landscape. How do you think the B52's will be remembered after a similar period? OK, it's classical music. Maybe a hard comparison for those of a generation whose sense of history is stunted (just guessing at your generational provenance). But 40 years (+/-) after Bob Dylan burst on the scene, his early work is still remembered as seminal. (Look that up in your Funk and Wagnall's... or Websters if you don't know what that is.) :rolleyes: ... And I'd bet he will still be remembered similarly 100 years from now. Same with the Beatles. (Characteristically blessed with a generous helping of songwriting and musical genius... well, at least 3 of them, anyway.) B52's? I don't think so. (Guess maybe they just changed your own personal musical landscape... and maybe a handful of others.) Yes, the B52's are fun. Catchy. But history-making? Come on! They'll be just a footnote in the music history books. Typical, too, of historically impaired persons to voice silly stereotypes about aging hippies and old posters on the wall. I'm 48, aging just a little bit, but can still appreciate or love about 90% of what I hear here on RP, which includes current music. I even like Everclear and Smash Mouth. (Surprise, surprise!) Guess I'll hobble on out of here while I still can. Someone get me my cane... :umbrella: (deploys protection against flying horse turds...) Don't worry, you'll be an old fart some day too, flaming some Young Turk... G' day! steve
More great music from my favorite artist... Daniel Lanois :cowboy:
Patrick wrote:
The audience response to this song means, I surmise, that the activism of the '60's is DEE EEE AYY DEE DEAD!
I disagree that the activism of the 60s is dead--it just accomplished a number of its goals and settled down a bit. Besides, this song came out in the 90s. On top of that, I seem to recall that Bob has added a few Grammys to his collection in recent years. And there are a number of other bands who have combined commercial and/or critical success with a social or political conscience over the last 20 years (think Radiohead, Rage Against the Machine, U2, Gomez, Tracy Chapman, etc. etc.).
Joe', I infer from your spelling that you are, in fact, British. I'll bet you're running around still with skinny ties and a moptop ... or perhaps you've glommed on to the hip-hop craze! Long live rock, dude... x
Pez'...I dare say that you are about 60 and have Dylan posters all over your room?..But, I think you forgetting the following.... You have no life...just get over it!!! If you are going to consider yourself a true fan of music, you have to start respecting all the music that influenced and will always continue to influence the music that YOU happen to like. If you even THINK that Shalamar did not influence Nirvana, the Pixies, Air, Radiohead, Elvis Costello, U2, and whoever else you happen to hold in high regard, you don't know the first part about music. This is not a specific defense for Shalamar, but a defense for every single musician that has ever been. You don't have to like them, I don't particularly like Bob Dylan, but I do have an incredible amount of respect for Shalamar how they changed the musical landscape and musical history, just as early B52's did... Just something to think about... (oops!)...x?
joe1 wrote:
I think that Pez needs a straight jacket...NOW!!!
What, were you born under a ROCK? Don't you realize that Dylan is the influence behind every single important artist since the 60s? Unbelievable.
I think that Pez needs a straight jacket...NOW!!!
I think this song is fantastic!
The audience response to this song means, I surmise, that the activism of the '60's is DEE EEE AYY DEE DEAD!
It's been a while since this was last played, huh? ;)
:roll: BORING :roll:
Heh heh. Dylan marks the hours here at RP. Yeah, Bill does tend to overplay some of his favourite artists.
O no not again Bob Dylan, does Bill have stock of this guy. :evil: