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The Rolling Stones — No Expectations
Album: Beggar's Banquet
Avg rating:
7.4

Your rating:
Total ratings: 665









Released: 1969
Length: 3:57
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Take me to the station
And put me on a train,
I've got no expectations
To pass through here again

Once I was a rich man
Now I am so poor
But never in my sweet short life
Have I felt like this before

You're heart is like a diamond
You throw you're pearls at swine
And as I watch you leaving me
You pack my peace of mind

Our love was like the water
The splashes on a stone
Our love is like our music
It's here, and then it's gone

So take me to the airport
And put me on a plane,
I've got no expectations
To pass through here again

Mm mm mm....
Comments (67)add comment
Fake Blues
 leechi wrote:
sometimes i feel like some of these "legends" in rock only exist because back then music generally just sucked ass so they did somewhat stick out i guess.

this is just underwhelming in every aspect.  

 
I wouldn't mind being born again in 1968 and this time be old enough to enjoy all that ass-suckin' music of back then {#Bananajam}
 leechi wrote:
sometimes i feel like some of these "legends" in rock only exist because back then music generally just sucked ass so they did somewhat stick out i guess.
this is just underwhelming in every aspect. 

Not nearly as underwhelming as this sad, witless attempt at trolling. At least physicsgenius could be amusing on occasion.
sometimes i feel like some of these "legends" in rock only exist because back then music generally just sucked ass so they did somewhat stick out i guess.

this is just underwhelming in every aspect.  
 LPCity wrote:
"So take me to the airport 
And put me on a plane"

After all these years of listening and I just now realized that The Ramones totally stole these two lines for "I Wanna Be Sedated." 
 
Kinda thinking the Stones ripped off the sound from Primal Scream {#Dancingbanana_2}
 calypsus_1 wrote:
 

The Rolling STONE AGE by ~JoniGodoy
Jonathan Godoy N.  ©2007-2010 ~JoniGodoy

 What would have happened if, among the archaeological discoveries, the experts had found evidence that the Rolling Stones lived in the first days of the creation?
If they did, this image could have been the nearest thing to what can be imagine.

...And calculating their age, it´s possible that they have lived that time, haha!

A Rolling´s Caricature, for Maxim Magazine and published by Editorial Televisa.
Enyoy!

 
Beauty Godoy!
"So take me to the airport 
And put me on a plane"

After all these years of listening and I just now realized that The Ramones totally stole these two lines for "I Wanna Be Sedated." 
 dadofsammy wrote:
Interesting...I have a very different take. Having heard the established Stones canon about a billion times, it's a pleasure to be re-acquainted with the lesser-played tunes from their catalogue.
 

I agree wholeheartedly.  Also, thank you for not misspelling canon. 
listen again.
SOLID
at the top of their game during this era
Love this song.  Love this album.  Love this band.  Love RP.
very nice!
Nice!
A great rock/blues fusion!
One of my favorites for sure.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

44 years, actually.

 

Maybe a historical reference to the song's position in 1994?
 Emwolb wrote:
25 years later and the song still stands
 
44 years, actually.
Mournful, melodic masterpiece by the Glimmer Twins.
{#Cowboy} 
25 years later and the song still stands
old_shep wrote:
Beautiful song....especially after suffering through Ani Defranco.

 

{#High-five}



 

Everybody in my churches loves this song...

My favorite Stones song, from my favorite Stones album.  A die hard classic.
So much harder work than Ani Difranco. It's OK but the stones say it all no expectations.
 WonderLizard wrote:
>>> Their Satanic Majesties—not a bad album<<<
 
It's pretty bad.  "She's a Rainbow" is a decent single, "2000 Light Years From Home" an OK album track, and another half-hour of absolute crap (including one song deemed worthy of incuding TWICE!


Their Satanic Majesties Request


Side one No.TitleLength 1."Sing This All Together" 3:462."Citadel" 2:503."In Another Land" (Bill Wyman)3:154."2000 Man" 3:075."Sing This All Together (See What Happens)" 8:33
Side two No.TitleLength 6."She's a Rainbow" 4:357."The Lantern" 4:248."Gomper" 5:089."2000 Light Years from Home" 4:4510."On with the Show"


 ziakut wrote:
Wow! A Stones tune that I don't dislike! This is a most unusual thing! Too bad the cover for this album is so repulsive!
 

The US version had a different cover made especially for people like you.
Wow! A Stones tune that I don't dislike! This is a most unusual thing! Too bad the cover for this album is so repulsive!
Quite possibly the most perfect Stones album from beginning to end..IMO
I've commented before  this way before ...a couple of dozen of Iconic Rock Songs...and then The RS can pull out another couple dozen of smaller masterpieces,  FIFTY years!

 joshfm wrote:
Yonder Mountain String Band does an excellent cover of this song. In fact, I first heard it through them. Pretty interesting.
 
COOL!
For my money this whole album's a 10. What a recovery from Their Satanic Majesties—not a bad album, but not anything like this one, where the band regained the high (so to speak) ground.
 spacemoose wrote:

While it might surprise them, the statement would be no less true.  What we call blues music draws heavily from European folk music (swiss, irish and english influences are easy to detect), as well as Africa.  These sources converged and were blended with the slave and jim crow experiences of the descendants to produce what we call the blues.  Even the instruments show this international heritage.  The harmonica comes from the old hapsburg empire (germany/austria/switzerland — where it is called the mundharmonica, which translates as mouth-accordian).  The guitar and banjo seem to evolve directly from an African instrument whos name escapes me.  The washboard, washboard base are products of the inequality and poverty whose dickensian nature is a direct product of European economic and social models.  The blues use European musical scales and rythms, while adding syncopation, 'blue notes', and an improvisational character  typical from Africa.  It's no wonder that the blues are enjoyed internationally.

Truly, the blues is international music — both in its sources and its audience.

 
Is jazz world music because those instruments were also developed in other countries? I'm also sure that jazz shares similarities with other pre-existing forms of music. To follow your logic, all music would be African since the oldest found human remains were discovered there. Surely Lucy was the first to bang a stick on a stone. 

The Blues belong to America.
'

 old_shep wrote:
Beautiful song....especially after suffering through Ani Defranco.
 
hee hee. she does drag on

Love it. Easy 10.
 unclehud wrote:
 xarhs wrote:
what do you mean american music  the blues is world music

I'm sure this will surprise a lot of folks like Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, BB King, and a half-dozen other old geezers from Memphis and the Mississippi delta.
 
While it might surprise them, the statement would be no less true.  What we call blues music draws heavily from European folk music (swiss, irish and english influences are easy to detect), as well as Africa.  These sources converged and were blended with the slave and jim crow experiences of the descendants to produce what we call the blues.  Even the instruments show this international heritage.  The harmonica comes from the old hapsburg empire (germany/austria/switzerland — where it is called the mundharmonica, which translates as mouth-accordian).  The guitar and banjo seem to evolve directly from an African instrument whos name escapes me.  The washboard, washboard base are products of the inequality and poverty whose dickensian nature is a direct product of European economic and social models.  The blues use European musical scales and rythms, while adding syncopation, 'blue notes', and an improvisational character  typical from Africa.  It's no wonder that the blues are enjoyed internationally.

Truly, the blues is international music — both in its sources and its audience.

I actually prefer the Soulsavers cover, with mark lanegan. You should really give it a try:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFM9yPP0yzY


 old_shep wrote:
Beautiful song....especially after suffering through Ani Difranco.
 
My feelings exactly.

Beautiful song....especially after suffering through Ani Defranco.
Ahhh, the Stones... That's the ticket.{#Cheers}

 

The Rolling STONE AGE by ~JoniGodoy
Jonathan Godoy N.  ©2007-2010 ~JoniGodoy

 What would have happened if, among the archaeological discoveries, the experts had found evidence that the Rolling Stones lived in the first days of the creation?
If they did, this image could have been the nearest thing to what can be imagine.

...And calculating their age, it´s possible that they have lived that time, haha!

A Rolling´s Caricature, for Maxim Magazine and published by Editorial Televisa.
Enyoy!


 LongGoneDaddy wrote:


America has always been a "melting pot" and just because these cats are from that island of the Empire, and not the Mississippi Delta or the hills of the Smokies, doesn't mean they don't feel it...music trancends geography.  Yup.
 

{#Clap} {#Sunny}
Just another reminder of how great the Rolling Stones once were.....{#Meditate}
Wow, this is a real treat, a fine flashback .... cheers Bill !
 beelzebubba wrote:
I like alot of Stones songs, but some of them, like this one, sound like cheap imitations of real American music.
 

America has always been a "melting pot" and just because these cats are from that island of the Empire, and not the Mississippi Delta or the hills of the Smokies, doesn't mean they don't feel it...music trancends geography.  Yup.
 xarhs wrote:
what do you mean american music  the blues is world music

I'm sure this will surprise a lot of folks like Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, BB King, and a half-dozen other old geezers from Memphis and the Mississippi delta.
My favorite Stone's Album, nice to hear this.
original cover - 
 
Yonder Mountain String Band does an excellent cover of this song. In fact, I first heard it through them. Pretty interesting.
love that slide guitar
 
 thewiseking wrote:

their best era.

 
Word!
 Ferret wrote:
To depressing...
 
To: depressing
From: Ferret

 


 thewiseking wrote:

their best era.

 


Giving birth and nourishing,
having without possessing,
acting with no expectations,
leading and not trying to control:
this is the supreme virtue.


{#Clap}

A favorite! So cool and bluesy. Great side guitar. Yeah! 
 beelzebubba wrote:
I like alot of Stones songs, but some of them, like this one, sound like cheap imitations of real American music.
 
what do you mean american music  the blues is world music

 beelzebubba wrote:
I like alot of Stones songs, but some of them, like this one, sound like cheap imitations of real American music.
 

you could apply this logic to 90% of pop music

their best era.


I can't understand why this song is currently under a 4 year "hibernation" here at RP? Last year, I walked into the Vietnam Veterans National Memorial in Angel Fire, NM, and this was the song playing while the "Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam" movie was showing in a continuous loop in the small theater. I sat down to watch for about 15 minutes, and proceeded to get pretty choked up (to say the least). All the gruesome images I grew up watching on the nightly news, back in gut-wrenching fashion to the accompaniment of Mick's voice & Keith's (or was it Brian's?) acoustic guitar. Powerful stuff, with or without the tie-in. Please start playing it again.
The Stones really weren't known for optimism, were they? "No Expectations" and "You Can't Always Get What You Want". :) Not one of my faves from the old geezers.
beelzebubba wrote:
I like alot of Stones songs, but some of them, like this one, sound like cheap imitations of real American music.
"real American music", huh... scary fella ;) No sympathy for the beelzebubba :P
Shimmer wrote:
Holy Moses, this sucks!
Sucks? I think not. The slide guitar, if nothing else, is excellent. Besides, just saying something "sucks" is meaningless. What, specifically, did you not like about this song?
Holy Moses, this sucks!
beelzebubba wrote:
I like alot of Stones songs, but some of them, like this one, sound like cheap imitations of real American music.
Interesting...I have a very different take. Having heard the established Stones canon about a billion times, it's a pleasure to be re-acquainted with the lesser-played tunes from their catalogue.
beelzebubba wrote:
I like alot of Stones songs, but some of them, like this one, sound like cheap imitations of real American music.
I don't understand. What is real American music? I've always liked this and many other lesser-known Stones songs that never get airplay.
I like alot of Stones songs, but some of them, like this one, sound like cheap imitations of real American music.
To depressing...