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Bruce Springsteen — Thunder Road
Album: Born To Run
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2169









Released: 1975
Length: 4:39
Plays (last 30 days): 1
The screen door slams, Mary's dress waves
Like a vision she dances across the porch as the radio plays
Roy Orbison's singing for the lonely
Hey, that's me and I want you only
Don't turn me home again, I just can't face myself alone again

Don't run back inside, darling, you know just what I'm here for
So you're scared and you're thinking that maybe we ain't that young anymore
Show a little faith, there's magic in the night
You ain't a beauty, but hey, you're alright
Oh, and that's alright with me

You can hide 'neath your covers and study your pain
Make crosses from your lovers, throw roses in the rain
Waste your summer praying in vain
For a savior to rise from these streets

Well now, I'm no hero, that's understood
All the redemption I can offer, girl, is beneath this dirty hood
With a chance to make it good somehow
Hey, what else can we do now?

Except roll down the window and let the wind blow back your hair
Well, the night's busted open, these two lanes will take us anywhere
We got one last chance to make it real, to trade in these wings on some wheels
Climb in back, heaven's waiting down on the tracks

Oh, come take my hand
We're riding out tonight to case the promised land
Oh, Thunder Road, oh, Thunder Road
Oh, Thunder Road

Lying out there like a killer in the sun
Hey, I know it's late, we can make it if we run
Oh, Thunder Road, sit tight
Take hold, Thunder Road

Well, I got this guitar and I've learned how to make it talk
And my car's out back if you're ready to take that long walk
From your front porch to my front seat
The door's open but the ride ain't free
And I know you're lonely for words that I ain't spoken
Tonight we'll be free, all the promises will be broken

There were ghosts in the eyes of all the boys you sent away
They haunt this dusty beach road in the skeleton frames of burned out Chevrolets
They scream your name at night in the street
Your graduation gown lies in rags at their feet

And in the lonely cool before dawn, you hear their engines roaring on
But when you get to the porch they're gone on the wind
So Mary climb in
It's a town full of losers, I'm pulling out of here to win
Comments (492)add comment
 freddyfender wrote:
The last line of the song rings absolutely true to me; "It's a town full of losers, I'm pulling out of here to win".  I grew up in the piss-ant central MN town of Wadena (might as well have been central MS given the overt racism and extreme ignorance); I left and never went back.
 
Lots of wasted days and wasted nights there in Minnesota, huh?
I sure wouldn't put any song by Bruce S. in top anything. Best rock-n-roll ever; Sunny Afternoon by the Kinks.
 wtango wrote:
YUP!!  Was then - is now - full 10!!!
 

This may be one of those songs, a few from Dylan, a few from Joni Mitchell, where the lyrics beat out the music as the best part.  But still great music.
 Ropes wrote:
I got the chance to see him on Broadway this past September. 4th row...center...I wasn't close enough to reach out and touch him but I was close enough. From what I have read I know he has battled depression, and for those of us with family members who suffer with the same, we understand the struggle. That evening he cried four times as he talked about his mom(Alzheimer's), his dad, Clarence, and those he grew up with who have passed. Heading home after the show, I thought about myself many years ago as a knucklehead teenager driving with the radio blasting Bruce on warm summer nights. Those memories bring a smile to my face. For those who don't get Bruce, I understand. But he added so much to the tapestry of my life that I am forever grateful, and seeing him that way that September evening was both so sad and so exhilarating. Thanks for the ride Bruce. Much appreciated.   
 
Great post.  And the indisputable fact, especially for those who have seen him live, as I have twice (only twice, I should add), is that he is one of the truly hardest working people in showbiz.  110% sincere giving energy on that stage, which in his younger days, at least, I can attest he was all over like human hurricane.  
Entire album is a 10 in my book.
My dad had a boxseat hookup at the meadowlands. Saw Bruce Springsteen there when I was 9 years old. This song brings back a lot of pleasant memories of Jersey. People like to talk shit about Jersey, but it was a great place to grow up. 
A classic. 
I saw him during his Darkness tour In 1978 or1979 in Toronto . It changed my life
The last line of the song rings absolutely true to me; "It's a town full of losers, I'm pulling out of here to win".  I grew up in the piss-ant central MN town of Wadena (might as well have been central MS given the overt racism and extreme ignorance); I left and never went back.
 Proclivities wrote:

You must have never seen him when he goes to a restaurant with an unlimited salad bar.

 
Well, yeah, I heard about some incident on 57th Street.
I don't own any of his albums, but I worked a concert of his back in the early 70's in the UVA gym. He was pretty unknown, I think he was billed as the next Dylan. But, God, it was absolutely the best concert I've ever been too (and I've been to many, many). Incredible energy.
 treatment_bound wrote:


I'm pretty sure I could point out northern Manitoba on a map, but please clue me in as to how to get to southern Patagonia.
 
Gee, sorry treatment_bound, I missed this 8-year old post.   

I hitched.   Well, my grandmother Kaete left me at the border crossing with Montana.   November 1976.

Passage from Colon, Panama to Golfo de Turbio cost me US$20 on a smuggler's boat.

The rest I hitched on cars, trucks, private planes, trains.  Paid for a bus in northern Mexico because two American tourists had been killed.   Paid for a few other trains where I had no choice.

Thunder Road
came on at 11:30 PM at night as I was travelling back north in an Argentinian truck following a backpack trip around the Paine Towers in southern Chile (los Torres del Paine).  


I'm pretty sure I'm not supposed to like music this popular...

...but good grief, I do.  I really, really do.
The kids in the 1983 Joe Dante movie Explorers named their spacecraft after this song.  Good stuff.
 DBCinCA wrote:
ChanceM3 wrote:
I have never, will never, understand how people can even stand Springsteen.
I guess everyone has their own version of this feeling... you just don't like something that everyone else seems to love. Sometimes it changes with time. I couldn't relate to Led Zepplin or Pink Floyd when I was young - partly because I couldn't relate to the people my age who were listening to these bands. In my twenties, I began to appreciate those bands more. I'm in my mid-thirties now, and while I like the Rolling Stones, I have still never felt they deserved as much adoration as they've received. But I've always been among the millions who liked Springsteen, The Who, U2, The Beatles, even as others say they're overrated.
 
A younger generation is never going to be the one to judge older music as overrated.  They know not where that music was coming from, their tastes are rooted in the moment, AND it's their job to forge ahead not look back.  Later, with age, may come the clarity as you describe here.

There's still time for you on the Rolling Stones... maybe in your forties you'll "get" them. 
 Gednabb wrote:
kspengel wrote:
it is no coincidence he is called the boss
Yeah...so many people hate their bosses . . . .
 
Nonetheless... he is above them.
 ImaOldman wrote:
No matter what you think of his recordings, seeing Bruce live is a near religious experience. He is literally "the hardest working man in show business" and the E Street Band is a force of nature.
 

One! Two! Three! Four!!...
It was a nice soundtrack to my senior year in high school (1975-1976) 
I got the chance to see him on Broadway this past September. 4th row...center...I wasn't close enough to reach out and touch him but I was close enough. From what I have read I know he has battled depression, and for those of us with family members who suffer with the same, we understand the struggle. That evening he cried four times as he talked about his mom(Alzheimer's), his dad, Clarence, and those he grew up with who have passed. Heading home after the show, I thought about myself many years ago as a knucklehead teenager driving with the radio blasting Bruce on warm summer nights. Those memories bring a smile to my face. For those who don't get Bruce, I understand. But he added so much to the tapestry of my life that I am forever grateful, and seeing him that way that September evening was both so sad and so exhilarating. Thanks for the ride Bruce. Much appreciated.   
Don’t read the book. Get it on audible and have Bruce read it to you!
The early boss is much more listenable.
It's surprising to see a song with so many 10 ratings with an overall 7.5 rating. Lots of Bruce haters pressing the 1 option {#Naughty}
"Roy Orbison's singing for the lonely"...and Bruce to my heart forever with his generous and romantic music.
No matter what you think of his recordings, seeing Bruce live is a near religious experience. He is literally "the hardest working man in show business" and the E Street Band is a force of nature.

I am about 3/4 through his autobiography.  Interesting stuff about how his early albums came together.  Even more interesting, because of early management contract under which he received peanuts for his first 3 albums, including this one, he had a rather modest income until 1982. 

The man paid his dues.  For 5-6 years, before getting that first recording contract, he was scraping by, living wherever he could, honing his craft.

   

 kretinburger wrote:
Cant understand the fuss about this guy.Very overrated in my book.

 
I've never read that book. Never will. He's a rock and roll maestro, and among the very hardest working people in show biz. If you'd ever seen him live, you'd know exactly what I mean. 
Can I interest anyone in a burned-out Chevrolet?

thundermtn09
Cant understand the fuss about this guy.Very overrated in my book.
I love hearing this over and over! I love his music and his politics. The nay-sayers just don't get him!{#Bananajam}{#Bananapiano}
 vinylbob wrote:
Bruce is over rated. He should know that many of his listeners may disagree with his politics.  

 
He does probably know and doesn't care.
 sfyi2001 wrote:


The guitar riff in 'Born to Run', the song, is all that has ever caught my attention from this Joizee Joker. 
Since it became apparent that he's got that sick - 'my thoughts on politics matter to people as much as my music' - delusion, I get almost as excited hearing anything he does as I do when 'The View' is on somewhere and I catch a glimpse of Behar and Goldberg.

 

 
Right on Sister! 
{#Bananajam}{#Dancingbanana_2}{#Bananapiano}{#Drummer}
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Self indulgent?
You sure you're not thinking of Sting (or Kanye West)?
Bruce is about the last guy I would call self indulgent.
 
You must have never seen him when he goes to a restaurant with an unlimited salad bar.
{#Propeller} 
 spotcheckbilly wrote:
Over the years he has become so self indulgent that his music is now unlistenable.
 
Self indulgent?
You sure you're not thinking of Sting (or Kanye West)?
Bruce is about the last guy I would call self indulgent.
Over the years he has become so self indulgent that his music is now unlistenable.


The guitar riff in 'Born to Run', the song, is all that has ever caught my attention from this Joizee Joker. 
Since it became apparent that he's got that sick - 'my thoughts on politics matter to people as much as my music' - delusion, I get almost as excited hearing anything he does as I do when 'The View' is on somewhere and I catch a glimpse of Behar and Goldberg.

 
 countyman wrote:
This song belongs over there on THAT pile, along with Free Bird and Stairway To Heaven.

 
AMEN! 
Bruce is over rated. He should know that many of his listeners may disagree with his politics.  
I NEVER get tired of this. It reminds me of wonderful, freedom-filled days driving around in my late teens and early 20s in the mid 1970s.
The Boss.
This song belongs over there on THAT pile, along with Free Bird and Stairway To Heaven.
Awesome song.  Awesome album.

His live presentation of this album at the Hammersmith Odeon was incredible.  I actually think I like HO better than BTR, and that is high praise, given what I'm comparing it to.

 
As it always has been and always will be, a very rare solid 10
 wgsu_1978 wrote:
Any chance for me to fully enjoy Springsteen was ruined by the massive, crushing hype that surrounded the release of this album, compounded by the relentless FM radio airplay and almost universal "Bruce is God" worship among his many fans at the time.

No album could have lived up to that kind of media/PR barrage, so for me "Born to Run" is a loud, busy, overwrought but generally OK album that hasn't aged well. I think I stand with some of the younger RP listeners on this one.
 
 
Yay!, you're still young.  I bet you liked him when nobody had heard of him yet, though.

saw them many times in concert during their wild innocent and born to run era. unforgettable
Bruce Springsteen, Bob Segar & John Mellencamp were okay on  the radio but for actually buying their records? 
.
.
no
 
40 years ago, i was 12, my brother put the needle on the record... BAM!! A flash, a light, thunder and storm, Springsteen came in my head. He's still there.
A song for the ages.  They'll be listening to this many years from now.
The sound track of my mis-spent youth. The first three albums, almost every song is a masterpiece.
Still fresh and compelling 4 decades later.

I adored this album.  Not so much his later material. 
B2R - 40th Annivesary - The cover of Time and Newsweek

https://www.greasylake.org/articles_record.php?s_keyword=yes&s_headline=Essential+Articles&Id=5&release_title=&concert_date=

https://www.greasylake.org/articles_record.php?s_keyword=yes&s_headline=Essential+Articles&Id=6&release_title=&concert_date=


Had a friend back when this came out who swore that I would love it. 

I didn't get it back then, and I still don't get it.

Nothing but noise to me. 
 wgsu_1978 wrote:
Any chance for me to fully enjoy Springsteen was ruined by the massive, crushing hype that surrounded the release of this album, compounded by the relentless FM radio airplay and almost universal "Bruce is God" worship among his many fans at the time.

No album could have lived up to that kind of media/PR barrage, so for me "Born to Run" is a loud, busy, overwrought but generally OK album that hasn't aged well. I think I stand with some of the younger RP listeners on this one.
 
 
That you most certainly do
 cc_rider wrote:
When this came out, I didn't get it. I get it now.

 
Same here.  Wish I had had these hopes, dreams, ambitions when I was a kid.
Any chance for me to fully enjoy Springsteen was ruined by the massive, crushing hype that surrounded the release of this album, compounded by the relentless FM radio airplay and almost universal "Bruce is God" worship among his many fans at the time.

No album could have lived up to that kind of media/PR barrage, so for me "Born to Run" is a loud, busy, overwrought but generally OK album that hasn't aged well. I think I stand with some of the younger RP listeners on this one.
 
 NoEnzLefttoSplit wrote:

I blame the Australians.

 
It all started with Frank Ifield.
So much DRAMA!!!
 Proclivities wrote:

Perhaps the club scene itself was restricted to clubs in large cities like NYC and LA, but there were several large selling "disco" hits by 1975: "Get Down Tonight, "That's The Way I Like It", "Rock Your Baby", Fly Robin Fly", "Rock The Boat", etc...  However, you are correct that disco really didn't 'engulf popular music' until after The Bee Gees and "Saturday Night Fever" a couple of years later.

 
I blame the Australians.
Arrgghhh!!  PSD!!!  PSD!!!
 Steely_D wrote:
Hey what else can we do now ?
Except roll down the window
And let the wind blow
Back your hair

It's hard to not give a song a 10 when, every time you hear it, it brings on waves of hope and regret and nostalgia and promise.

 
and that sense of pending desperation...
love this Bruce - when he put poetry to music!

 Not writing huge overblown anthems like later on.
Can enjoy Bruce now but really hated him for a while due to the fact of have to listen to him and all the drunken fan boys singing to him during college oh those many years ago. 
When this came out, I didn't get it. I get it now.
Hey what else can we do now ?
Except roll down the window
And let the wind blow
Back your hair

It's hard to not give a song a 10 when, every time you hear it, it brings on waves of hope and regret and nostalgia and promise.
PSD!! PSD!! PSD!!
 Sasha2001 wrote:

Not to put too fine a point on it, but in 1975 disco was still largely an underground club scene in a few large cities like LA and New York. It's practitioners were mostly African American, Latino, and gay which made for an interesting melange of cultures on the dance floor. The saddest aspect of the disco was not that it briefly engulfed popular music, but that it's ability to bring such disperate elements of society together and integrate them on the dance floor was misunderstood by a rather ignorant populace who embraced and then angrily rejected it without ever understanding that it was never intended for mass consumption in the first place.
 
Perhaps the club scene itself was restricted to clubs in large cities like NYC and LA, but there were several large selling "disco" hits by 1975: "Get Down Tonight, "That's The Way I Like It", "Rock Your Baby", Fly Robin Fly", "Rock The Boat", etc...  However, you are correct that disco really didn't 'engulf popular music' until after The Bee Gees and "Saturday Night Fever" a couple of years later.
 h8rhater wrote:

Exactly! 

Where do these people come from that know not what they are talking about?!? 

And even worse... "#justsayin".  Ugh!!

 
The guy probably didn't know who Steinman was.
 leafmold wrote:
I don't care what anyone says. I will always love Bruce.

 
Agreed. And to hear Clarence's Sax again. What a sound he had.
I don't care what anyone says. I will always love Bruce.
I want Bruce to sing with Lucinda Williams on Car Wheels on a Gravel Road. Or maybe marry her.
Well crafted, well sung, but... I just find it tedious - sorry!
 jberko wrote:
Way over rated.  

 

Was never a fan, either.   He seems like a cool guy, though.
Bill, You can change musical directions anytime !

 This is PURE TEN .



 idiot_wind wrote:
Boy oh boy...

These guys sure sound like Kid Rock.  
 
Nah. Bruce totally ripped his sound from Justin Bieber.
 
Although I am from Sweden, I know the lyrics by heart.
 adpucci wrote:
i know it's a problem i have, but i can't stand this guy. on top of which, this song is identical to to bat out of hell #justsayin
 

 
Emwolb wrote:

Well then blame Steinman for ripping off Bruce since there's 2 years betw BTR's release (1975) and BOOH's release (1977)
 
Exactly! 

Where do these people come from that know not what they are talking about?!? 

And even worse... "#justsayin".  Ugh!!
 adpucci wrote:
i know it's a problem i have, but i can't stand this guy. on top of which, this song is identical to to bat out of hell #justsayin
 
Well then blame Steinman for ripping off Bruce since there's 2 years betw BTR's release (1975) and BOOH's release (1977)
 calypsus_1 wrote:

Springsteen by ~jasonseiler
Jason Seiler  ©2007-2010 ~jasonseiler
https://www.imaginismstudios.com

Title: Springsteen
Software: Photoshop

This is what I did about a month ago, a spot illustration of the "new" Bruce Springsteen, for The Weekly Standard. At first it was going to have a background and print a little larger. Then half way through painting it that way, it was moved to a different section of the magazine, and a background was no longer needed. No big deal, part of the job, it's a weekly magazine, things are bound to change last minute. I really love working with these guys and I hope to continue on with them, I enjoy illustrating current issues, it's more interesting and fun for me then painting random celebs! All in all, two days worth on my part, about 14 to 16 hours of work.

.



 



 



Great illustration! - As a writer of sorts I would love, just once to write something as poignant and heartfelt as "Thunder Road."
{#Bananapiano}

Springsteen by ~jasonseiler
Jason Seiler  ©2007-2010 ~jasonseiler
https://www.imaginismstudios.com

Title: Springsteen
Software: Photoshop

This is what I did about a month ago, a spot illustration of the "new" Bruce Springsteen, for The Weekly Standard. At first it was going to have a background and print a little larger. Then half way through painting it that way, it was moved to a different section of the magazine, and a background was no longer needed. No big deal, part of the job, it's a weekly magazine, things are bound to change last minute. I really love working with these guys and I hope to continue on with them, I enjoy illustrating current issues, it's more interesting and fun for me then painting random celebs! All in all, two days worth on my part, about 14 to 16 hours of work.

.



 


i know it's a problem i have, but i can't stand this guy. on top of which, this song is identical to to bat out of hell #justsayin
What a songwriter!
 Sasha2001 wrote:

Not to put too fine a point on it, but in 1975 disco was still largely an underground club scene in a few large cities like LA and New York. It's practitioners were mostly African American, Latino, and gay which made for an interesting melange of cultures on the dance floor. The saddest aspect of the disco was not that it briefly engulfed popular music, but that it's ability to bring such disperate elements of society together and integrate them on the dance floor was misunderstood by a rather ignorant populace who embraced and then angrily rejected it without ever understanding that it was never intended for mass consumption in the first place.









 
 
And you know all this how?   {#Eh}
ok this song make me long for the sound of vinyl, just not the same over the internet.
My youth runs again... Now where did put that convertible.....  {#Clap}{#Bananajam}{#Drunk}
Undeniably great song.
 govna wrote:
I feel like it is my duty as an american to learn these lyrics.  It's just that, there's like...so many.

 
SQUIRREL!

I can't believe this music came out of a small town 7 miles from where I grew up!
Freehold,NJ baby! 


I feel like it is my duty as an american to learn these lyrics.  It's just that, there's like...so many.
 ziakut wrote:
This tune merely confirms my indifference about Bruce Springsteen. You either 'get it' or you 'don't. I guess I don't. Never, ever understood the appeal of his music. As with Bob Dylan...he's a superb lyricist and storyteller, but to me...that's about it.
  And one hell of a performer!


 gjr wrote:
the album that saved us from disco.....probably the best album of the '70's....every cut was GREAT

 
Not to put too fine a point on it, but in 1975 disco was still largely an underground club scene in a few large cities like LA and New York. It's practitioners were mostly African American, Latino, and gay which made for an interesting melange of cultures on the dance floor. The saddest aspect of the disco was not that it briefly engulfed popular music, but that it's ability to bring such disperate elements of society together and integrate them on the dance floor was misunderstood by a rather ignorant populace who embraced and then angrily rejected it without ever understanding that it was never intended for mass consumption in the first place.









 
the album that saved us from disco.....probably the best album of the '70's....every cut was GREAT
 fiddler wrote:
Like a 5 minute movie every time it plays...a really really good movie.

 
Well put.  It really paints a picture of being a high school kid with dreams, ambitions, fears...

This song and Born to Run are two of my all time favorites.
Boy oh boy...


These guys sure sound like Kid Rock.  
Gives me chills. What numeric scale does that translate to? I went with 9.
Has to be his best work ever.  

I once heard someone remark of this song (maybe it was on here) something along the lines of "Bruce Springsteen is the only guy who can get away with using the word 'redemption' in a song about redemption." 

And for the record, I'm not a huge Bruce fan.  He's got his moments, though, and this is sure one of them.  : ) 
This tune merely confirms my indifference about Bruce Springsteen. You either 'get it' or you 'don't. I guess I don't. Never, ever understood the appeal of his music. As with Bob Dylan...he's a superb lyricist and storyteller, but to me...that's about it.
What about the Chairman of the Board?

 
akaike wrote:
One of the few people that makes me proud to be from Jersey!

 


 akaike wrote:
One of the few people that makes me proud to be from Jersey!
 
I've ALWAYS been proud to be from Jersey.....but yes,Bruce being from there does help(but there's hundreds more)
Boober-Exit 9(NJ Tpk) 
 jberko wrote:
Way over rated.  

 
Thunder Load. Blech. 
 Cynaera wrote:

So - I'm sitting here at 9:40 p.m. with the speakers cranked. Glad to be true to my roots - and I love this song in ways I cannot even describe....

 

Miss you so much, Cynaera...

love this song...
 
Like a 5 minute movie every time it plays...a really really good movie.
One of the few people that makes me proud to be from Jersey!
Perhaps this song is the single greatest concert "moment" that I have ever experienced.
 martinc wrote:
Saw him a couple of weeks ago. Had not seen him since the early 80 (have seen him 5 times now) I was blown away. Tremendous energy, in strong voice, EStreet Band strong (16 peice band now). His artistry shown through all the Boss hype etc. 
 
Ditto. Bruce is still the hardest working man in show business! His recent Vancouver show was also awesome.
Great song one of the ones that made people sit up and listen
Nine? I had this at nine??

I've got to stop rating songs when I'm apparently outta my freakin' mind.

Saw him a couple of weeks ago. Had not seen him since the early 80 (have seen him 5 times now) I was blown away. Tremendous energy, in strong voice, EStreet Band strong (16 peice band now). His artistry shown through all the Boss hype etc. 
Cloyingly heartfelt.

I learned to love this CD in northern Manitoba and Saskatchewan shortly after it came out.  My union went on strike at the open-pit coal mine where I worked in British Columbia. And there I went looking for work as a fishing guide and quickly ran into protectionist native Cree politics.  It was an early lesson.  

 

Then a couple of years later, it came on in a cargo truck as I hitch-hiked late at night out of a coal mine in the southern Argentinian Patagonia heading back north to Brazil and Bolivia.

 

Electric. American rock was on fire during the mid-1970s.  FWIW, it takes a lot for pop music to stand out in either Argentina or Brazil.  Argentina's folk music traditions are as rich and even more varied than those of Brazil!  


 wolfian wrote:
GODLIKE!!!
 
Yes! {#Biggrin}
GODLIKE!!!
 Byronape wrote:

It's a sound argument, but I think you are giving the majority of modern music too much credit.  A few more bands trying to sound like Whitesnake would be better than what we have now.  Overly produced and drastically over sexualized Madonna rip offs are the highlight of today's pop music.  Sure, there is good stuff coming out all the time, but most of everything I hear that is new is complete dross written for (or by, depending on how charitable you feel like being) 13 year old girls.  It's like $$$ has become so much more important than real talent, that the music industry has stopped looking for actually talented people and is only looking for marketable people.

Marketable of course, is a polite way of saying pretty and exploitable. 
 
I hear ya.  But you don't like big corporations making decisions about music, do you?  Nor should you.  Times have changed.  DJs like Bill used to have a lot more clout, and they could influence what got played on the radio stations that reached millions.  Now, if you want, you can start a band and post your work on the Internet and get recognized with out the help of a recording contract.   It happens.  Music is that one thing where excellence almost always gets the notice it deserves.  So, what's the problem? Why does the Madonna rip-offs bother you so much?  Let it be.
Ahhhh...I was 15 & living in New Jersey & never heard anything like it before
Way over rated.  
 black321 wrote:
 RKeaton wrote:
I sometimes wonder if there is any room left in the sound spectrum for songs like this to be written...or did guys like Bruce use it all up.
 
Pop music is usually derivative. Many of the "classic" bands got their sound from blues, jazz, pop standards...but made them their own. I think most music these days is still derivative, but derivative of other rock bands, which makes the tunes less exciting to me. I remember in the 80s when bands like Whitesnake were ridiculed for sounding too zeppelin like. Bands that do the same thing now, albeit in a "cooler" fashion, are complimented.
 
It's a sound argument, but I think you are giving the majority of modern music too much credit.  A few more bands trying to sound like Whitesnake would be better than what we have now.  Overly produced and drastically over sexualized Madonna rip offs are the highlight of today's pop music.  Sure, there is good stuff coming out all the time, but most of everything I hear that is new is complete dross written for (or by, depending on how charitable you feel like being) 13 year old girls.  It's like $$$ has become so much more important than real talent, that the music industry has stopped looking for actually talented people and is only looking for marketable people.

Marketable of course, is a polite way of saying pretty and exploitable. 
Why don´t Human Touch??
BRrrrrr!!! 
TERRIBLE!
God I don't know what year this was but my brother and I went down to the shore. You could stay in a decrepit rooming house in Ocean Grove - a religious community with blue laws etc - cheap, then walk over to Asbury for the action. After a few bong hits in the room, we wander over to The Stone Pony and they won't let me because I forgot my ID. SO I go back to get it and - a few more bong hits later - i'm in for the night.

Now you know what happens next: at 3 am my brother is shaking me awake because Bruce showed up at the bar and played all night.