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The Band — The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down (live)
Album: Rock Of Ages
Avg rating:
7.8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 842









Released: 1972
Length: 4:33
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Virgil Kane is the name
And I served on the Danville train
'Till Stoneman's cavalry came
And tore up the tracks again

In the winter of '65
We were hungry, just barely alive
By May the 10th, Richmond had fell
It's a time I remember, oh so well

The night they drove old Dixie down
And the bells were ringing
The night they drove old Dixie down
And the people were singing
They went, "Na, na, la, na, na, la"

Back with my wife in Tennessee
When one day she called to me
"Virgil, quick, come see,
There goes Robert E. Lee!"

Now, I don't mind chopping wood
And I don't care if the money's no good
You take what you need
And you leave the rest
But they should never
Have taken the very best

The night they drove old Dixie down
And the bells were ringing
The night they drove old Dixie down
And all the people were singing
They went, "Na, na, la, na, na, la"

Like my father before me
I will work the land
And like my brother above me
Who took a rebel stand

He was just 18, proud and brave
But a Yankee laid him in his grave
I swear by the mud below my feet
You can't raise a Kane back up
When he's in defeat

The night they drove old Dixie down
And the bells were ringing
The night they drove old Dixie down
And all the people were singing
They went, "Na, na, la, na, na, la"

The night they drove old Dixie down
And all the bells were ringing
The night they drove old Dixie down
And the people were singing
They went, "Na, na, la, na, na, la"
Comments (142)add comment
 jackie0 wrote:
Levon Helm -  (was)  Living proof that memory actually is encoded and travels on DNA.
He totally nailed the essence of confederate angst in this anthem of sadness and remorse.   
 levon helm
 
Oh my god, Levon (center) looks just like Robert E. Lee
Neither here nor there, but as this song played, which always troubles a Southerner's soul just so darn sad, I was simultaneously doing something on the internet whereby one has to prove you're not a robot by clicking on boxes of assorted imagery. My verification command was to click on all the pictures that had statues in them. But none was Robert E. Lee. Who (something didn't sit well in VA) happened, simultaneously, to be trending on Twitter. Ghosts; not that anyone really believes in them, but that past sure ain't dead.
I really love hearing Joan Baez sing this number 
Another crappy song from a crappy, overrated band. Never understood the appeal of this stuff.
 gmsingh123 wrote:
Great song.  I wonder if Robbie Robertson has any regrets about it today about writing a song that's totally sympathetic to the Confederates. 
I guess the slavery and lynchings didn't seem so bad in those days.
 
capandjudy wrote:
I wouldn't take the song that way. It is a great song about the fall of the south and the people that experienced it and not a political statement.
I just don't see what you are saying.
 
Yes, thank you.
This is another example of a songwriter writing from the perspective of a character, fictional or otherwise. Not sure why some listeners think every lyric an artist writes reflect their own personal feelings on a given topic. To suggest that Robbie Robertson, given his native heritage, would be in favour of slavery and lynchings is clearly wrong.
 TJOpootertoot wrote:

Vocally, yes. The lyrics and music are by Canadian Robbie Robertson though.
This version gets a 9 on principle but it's maybe 30% as good as The Last Waltz version

 

Nothing on The Last Waltz is as good as Rock of Ages: the best live album ever.
 gmsingh123 wrote:
Great song.  I wonder if Robbie Robertson has any regrets about it today about writing a song that's totally sympathetic to the Confederates.  I guess the slavery and lynchings didn't seem so bad in those days.

 
I wouldn't take the song that way. It is a great song about the fall of the south and the people that experienced it and not a political statement. I just don't see what you are saying.
Great song.  I wonder if Robbie Robertson has any regrets about it today about writing a song that's totally sympathetic to the Confederates.  I guess the slavery and lynchings didn't seem so bad in those days.
A great, evocative rendition of this song.  Makes me think of a guy sittin' there in the firelight of a late evening, sitting besides his still in his Blue Ridge Mountain back woods home, crying and singing about people and times lost all while hitting on the squeezin's jug. This one definitely comes from the heart. 

A great album, too, though it doesn't quite match their opus, The Last Waltz.

Just my opinion.  I could be wrong.

Highlow
American Net'Zen
 Profound words.

jackie0 wrote:
Levon Helm -  (was)  Living proof that memory actually is encoded and travels on DNA.
He totally nailed the essence of confederate angst in this anthem of sadness and remorse.   
 levon helm

 


 jackie0 wrote:
Levon Helm -  (was)  Living proof that memory actually is encoded and travels on DNA.
He totally nailed the essence of confederate angst in this anthem of sadness and remorse.   
 levon helm

 
Apparently, Canadian Robbie Robertson (not Levon as someone else already noted) is also able nail the essence of the tragedy faced by the French Acadian people that were forcibly removed from their homes and deported en masse by the British in the 18th century (see Acadian Driftwood played here on RP).  A travesty that is probably greater than the putting down of a rebellious insurrection against the lawful government of United States of America aimed specifically at the perpetuation of aristocracy, racism, human bondage, and forced labor in the southern states. 
 jackie0 wrote:
Levon Helm -  (was)  Living proof that memory actually is encoded and travels on DNA.
He totally nailed the essence of confederate angst in this anthem of sadness and remorse.   
 levon helm
 
Vocally, yes. The lyrics and music are by Canadian Robbie Robertson though.
This version gets a 9 on principle but it's maybe 30% as good as The Last Waltz version
One of the most discordant, out of sync songs ever and Levon's voice like sandpaper ... but sheer heaven to hear. {#Sunny}
 TianGongZhong wrote:
I definitely like more the version of Joan Baez. 
The version of The Band is lame (==> 2).
 

I can understand your preference for Joan's version but jackie0 is right:
 

 jackie0 wrote:
Levon Helm -  (was)  Living proof that memory actually is encoded and travels on DNA.
He totally nailed the essence of Confederate angst in this anthem of sadness and remorse.    
 

   

That's part of the interesting paradox of The Band: most of them were Canadian but they captured an essence of a bygone America.
 hayduke2 wrote:

that's a beauty of a visual picture treatment_bound (I mean the ice cream bucket : ), Joan B is a dreamboat 

Turns out I actually posted the cover from the sheet music down below, and not the 45 record. 

According to Wiki, this is the original sleeve, yet I found at least three others with different photos of Joan on Google for the 45 of this song by Joan, so I couldn't tell you if this is the first. 

But at the end of the day, it didn't really matter, because my sister would just toss the sleeves anyway and stack about 50 records in her ugly white pail!

 

File:The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down - Joan Baez.jpeg


Levon Helm -  (was)  Living proof that memory actually is encoded and travels on DNA.
He totally nailed the essence of confederate angst in this anthem of sadness and remorse.   
 levon helm
 treatment_bound wrote:

Should I be embarrassed that I didn't know The Band was the original artist on this song until about 1976?
My sister used to have this record in her gallon size plastic Kemp's ice cream pail of 45's... 
 
        

 

 
that's a beauty of a visual picture treatment_bound (I mean the ice cream bucket : ), Joan B is a dreamboat 
 TianGongZhong wrote:
I definitely like more the version of Joan Baez. 
The version of The Band is lame (==> 2).

 

I definitely like more the version of Joan Baez
Great song. I like the Last Waltz version best.
This one rates a 10.  The Last Waltz version is at least a 12.
Song was so beautiful
Makes me think about my great-grandfather, who joined the CSA at the war's start and served in Stonewall Jackson's Black Horse Cavalry. He was not an easy or very kind man by all accounts but I do wonder whether he gave much thought to slavery or was more concerned about defending his home state, Virginia. 
 By_The_Bay wrote:
I much favor the Last Waltz version.

 
Yes, this is a 9, only because the energy (in Helm's vocals and everything else; gawd, the brass section!) in the Last Waltz version is so damned amazing. That version is definitive, as far as I'm concerned but the song is still an amazing thing.
 By_The_Bay wrote:
I much favor the Last Waltz version.

 
Agree.
I much favor the Last Waltz version.
I don't like this song and the PSD button keeps taking me back to Main. I can't escape! I'll just wait till it's over.
Go on ahead without me. I'll catch up in a few.
Go on.
I'll be okay sitting here. I promise.
Okay.
See ya. 

Shame, shame, shame on me!
The only version that I knew so far was the german cover by Juliane Werding, which is - to put it mildly - quite horrifying:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=goaN_AVi2zA

Bill, thank you so much for expanding my musical horizon!


 hippiechick wrote:
When I was in college, some guy once said to me "I am going to play you the most beautiful song in the world," and he played me this.
 
Everybody in my homeless camp loves this song...

you can spank me any time you want...
{#Cheers}
 Baketown wrote:
One Word, CLASSIC!

 
............... G O D L I K E is the word you are looking for
 Baketown wrote:
One Word, CLASSIC!

 
Ponderous!
One Word, CLASSIC!

Should I be embarrassed that I didn't know The Band was the original artist on this song until about 1976?
My sister used to have this record in her gallon size plastic Kemp's ice cream pail of 45's... 
 
        

 

 helgigermany wrote:

Levon Helm!

 
adore him.
Not completely my cuppa tea...but I can appreciate the sentimentality of this. It's actually a very good song.
Good stuff here.  
didn't like it then don't like it now
 scraig wrote:
Is that Adam Sandler on vocals?
 
Levon Helm!
 scraig wrote:
Is that Adam Sandler on vocals?

 
Why does the name of that vile hack keep popping up in the song threads?
The Rock of Ages is a very good live album.

Please consdier playing a few more cuts.


Oh yeah...remember when RnR use to experiment...get creative with such strange instruments as: trumpets, pianos, and trombones?


Or when RnR sometimes had off-the-wall lyrics? 


Or when, singers use to harmonize as a complement to the instruments? 


RnR: RIP.               
       
RIP Levon
 sirdroseph wrote:
Agree, it just doesn't get any better than this.  10.{#Notworthy}
 
Yes indeed. This song always puts in seriously emotional state.

and I can't say that of many tunes.
In the words of SNL's Leonard Pinth Garnell: "unrelentingly bad"...
dang some high flyin comments on this here song
 



Is that freedom rock?  The Band documentary on Net Flix, etc is good to watch.  Lots of live and studio cuts. Cool the Drummer was the lead singer like the Eagles....




oh, i love this so much.
always reminds me of my mom.
 Papernapkin wrote:
Hillbilly music.
 
So? Most modern pop music (apart from Techno) is or at least descended from "Hillbilly music." The Southern and Appalachian cultures and their stories of lost glory, poverty and suffering (both black and white) are about the best American stories. It's always amazing to me that the very white instrument of the banjo is really Africa. "Ain't that America...?"
 Hannio wrote:


In the politically correct world of Wikipedia what you say is true.  But I have been reading The Economist and Der Spiegel for decades.  They use "American" exclusively for citizens of the USA, except when they are hypocritically contending that Americans can also refer to all inhabitants of the new world.  Which I don't argue against at all, but I doubt you will ever find a Canadian, a Mexican or a Brazilian referred to as an American in the European press.  And the original point I was making is that Canadians themselves want to have it both ways.  They loathe being referred to as Americans and not specifically Canadians, yet at the same time are offended that the term "American" in common usage (by the rest of the world, not just in the US) doesn't include them.
 

In Spain I met a truly nice person who, after I introduced myself via e-mail as "an American", responded, not disingenuously, "So where are you from?".  I met numerous people in Spain who knew the history of the "Norteamericano/Americano" distinction well enough though.  A citizen of Brazil is Brazilian.  If I am not American, then what am I?  Spain has a convenient way around the debate with the word Estadounidense, which I never once heard used in two years living there.  This is the equivalent of saying in English "I am Unitedstatian" instead of "I am American".   You're right about the Economist, BTW.  In the two other countries I have lived in, Israel (in Hebrew) and Russia, we're Americans, no distinction whatsoever exists  - I learned the langauges well.
     
And the Joan Baez cover, from Diamonds and Rust, is good too.  But the original is seldom equaled, much less surpassed. 
 Papernapkin wrote:
Hillbilly music.
 

Agree, it just doesn't get any better than this.  10.{#Notworthy}
 Otomi wrote:
On the German disambiguation page the continental sense precedes the national sense. Repeating this trial with the adjectives American, americano, américain, and Amerikaner produced similar results.
 
While this reflects positively on German Wikipedians, I have yet to meet a German who in a regular conversation would interpret the statement "er ist Amerikaner" as "he is from the northern or southern Americas", rather than "he's from the US".
 Otomi wrote:

Howdy, Hannio. I thought you might be right, so I designed a simple experiment to put your claim that "the world recognizes the term 'American' as a USA citizen" to the test. I looked up America, América, Amérique, and Amerika in the English, Spanish, French, and German Wikipedia pages. I decided that Wikipedia was a good place to look, because its democratic orientation can give us a glimpse at what people in a given online language community tend to think. The first search, on the English language web page, took me to a disambiguation page where the continental sense of the word (North, Central, and South America plus nearby islands) is listed first, then the United States of America. Searches in the other three languages took me directly to the continental description. On the Spanish disambiguation page we are warned that the Real Academia Española, arbiters of linguistic propriety in this language, discourage the use of "America" in reference to the United States. On the main French page for Amérique it is stated that this word should not be confused with the United States of America. On the German disambiguation page the continental sense precedes the national sense. Repeating this trial with the adjectives American, americano, américain, and Amerikaner produced similar results. This experiment tends to confirm what I thought I knew from experience in my travels and contacts with people from around the world, that outside the USA most people understand the words America, American and their cognates in the continental sense.

- Otomi in pedant mode (sorry, folks, I'll try to lighten up)
 

In the politically correct world of Wikipedia what you say is true.  But I have been reading The Economist and Der Spiegel for decades.  They use "American" exclusively for citizens of the USA, except when they are hypocritically contending that Americans can also refer to all inhabitants of the new world.  Which I don't argue against at all, but I doubt you will ever find a Canadian, a Mexican or a Brazilian referred to as an American in the European press.  And the original point I was making is that Canadians themselves want to have it both ways.  They loathe being referred to as Americans and not specifically Canadians, yet at the same time are offended that the term "American" in common usage (by the rest of the world, not just in the US) doesn't include them.
 Papernapkin wrote:
 And your favorites list is stuck in the 70s.

On_The_Beach wrote:

This from someone who rated a Tori Amos song a 10?! Thanks for the laugh!  {#Lol}
 
 
Not stuck in the 70's - giving props to the timeless and talented...
Hillbilly music.
{#Notworthy} 
 And your favorites list is stuck in the 70s.

On_The_Beach wrote:

This from someone who rated a Tori Amos song a 10?! Thanks for the laugh!  {#Lol}
 


Is that Adam Sandler on vocals?


Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...


 
 Curley24 wrote:
By far the worst song by the worst band in the history of rock 'n roll. I have never understood the reason we MUST like this band; after all, EVERY pop music critic in every newspaper or magazine would go on and on in love with these guys. I've never met a person who likes the group or any of their songs. . . .
 
This from someone who rated a Tori Amos song a 10?! Thanks for the laugh!  {#Lol}
We have met the band. {#Yes}
It's a history thing. 

Well said! I bet you like the Juliane Werding version better?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8s9Z37FSV84
 


10 cubed!
 Curley24 wrote:
By far the worst song by the worst band in the history of rock 'n roll. I have never understood the reason we MUST like this band; after all, EVERY pop music critic in every newspaper or magazine would go on and on in love with these guys. I've never met a person who likes the group or any of their songs. 

I say this as someone who loves all kinds of music. I have over 3,000 records, a ton of CDs, was a music major in college (for a while) and spend a few dollars at iTunes every week. 

 
Well said! I bet you like the Juliane Werding version better?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8s9Z37FSV84


 Curley24 wrote:
By far the worst song by the worst band in the history of rock 'n roll.
 
That's gotta be by far the worst comment in the history of RP message boards.

 Curley24 wrote:
By far the worst song by the worst band in the history of rock 'n roll. I have never understood the reason we MUST like this band; after all, EVERY pop music critic in every newspaper or magazine would go on and on in love with these guys. I've never met a person who likes the group or any of their songs. 

I say this as someone who loves all kinds of music. I have over 3,000 records, a ton of CDs, was a music major in college (for a while) and spend a few dollars at iTunes every week. 

  Interesting. Since the average rating is over '8', your opinion, while certainly valid, seems to have very few supporters. Just sayin'.


By far the worst song by the worst band in the history of rock 'n roll. I have never understood the reason we MUST like this band; after all, EVERY pop music critic in every newspaper or magazine would go on and on in love with these guys. I've never met a person who likes the group or any of their songs. 

I say this as someone who loves all kinds of music. I have over 3,000 records, a ton of CDs, was a music major in college (for a while) and spend a few dollars at iTunes every week. 

 onomasticator wrote:
 fredriley wrote:

Ah, right. Being an ignoramus the other side of the Pond I was never quite sure what this was about, but figured it was something to do with the war. A shame it's still being fought, going by messages such as the above. That's a bit like some hard-core Irish Republicans still having it in for England on account of what Oliver Cromwell did 3 centuries ago. Regrettably, the map of the world is driven by inter-State warfare and imperialism, and us grunts just have to accept what results. Pining for a forgotten and defeated State from 200 years ago is both pointless and leads to some very dangerous and reactionary revanchism. Let's just deal with what is, not what should have been, and improve our societies from their current state.
 
Well, being an ignoramus living on same side of said pond, but hailing from the Land of Lincoln, it is my opinion one cannot understand the US without understanding the American Civil War, its causes and consequences.  History can be a pain that way.  

BTW, I also happen to believe one cannot understand England today without understanding the English Civil War - but, whatever . . .  
 
Agreed - understanding history is absolutely essential for analysis, and understanding, of the current state of a society. What is not essential, and indeed is positively dangerous, is nostalgic pining for a State/state from centuries ago and viewing it as some kind of Golden Age. Demagogues and reactionary nationalists love that sort of thing, as was murderously clear during the Balkan wars in the 90s when reactionary Serb and Croat nationalists resurrected mythical states and heroes to inspire and legitimate their campaigns of conquest and ethnic cleansing.

I would recommend the Scottish model. The Scottish National Party has recently won elections to the devolved Scottish parliament, and will be moving for independence from the UK. SNP nationalism is forward-looking, inclusive and social democratic. Modern Scots Nats understand history and the appalling crimes committed in recent centuries (primarily The Clearances in the Highlands) and how history's shaped the Scotland of today, but they look forward to an independent multi-ethnic State in Europe and the manifold social and economic benefits that independence may bring, rather than looking back to some mythical Celtic Eden destroyed by evil, perfidious Albion and bearing massive grudges, as reactionary Scot Nats did in the past. Looking forward is progressive, looking backwards regressive and reactionary.

We love the band.

Chills.......every........time, all versions!{#Notworthy}


Easily my favourite Band tune.
 mvanderford60 wrote:
...Since the wars, all three groups - American Southerners, Irish and French Canadians have been vilified, portrayed as dirty, ignorant, diseased, breeding out of control, marginalized economically, and generally considered morally deficient by the dominating force — this has lasted for Hundreds of Years, through multiple generations — as indicated by the arrogant and imperialistic comments below.

 This is what the song is about.
  Yes!

 Otomi wrote:
...I thought you might be right, so I designed a simple experiment to put your claim that "the world recognizes the term 'American' as a USA citizen" to the test...
  Well done!

Wonderful, just wonderful! 10!
 Hannio wrote:
This is hilarious.  Canadians throw themselves into fits of high dudgeon whenever a Canadian artist is mistaken for an American, and at the same time they are not a little peeved that the world recognizes the term "American" as a USA citizen. 
 
Howdy, Hannio. I thought you might be right, so I designed a simple experiment to put your claim that "the world recognizes the term 'American' as a USA citizen" to the test. I looked up America, América, Amérique, and Amerika in the English, Spanish, French, and German Wikipedia pages. I decided that Wikipedia was a good place to look, because its democratic orientation can give us a glimpse at what people in a given online language community tend to think. The first search, on the English language web page, took me to a disambiguation page where the continental sense of the word (North, Central, and South America plus nearby islands) is listed first, then the United States of America. Searches in the other three languages took me directly to the continental description. On the Spanish disambiguation page we are warned that the Real Academia Española, arbiters of linguistic propriety in this language, discourage the use of "America" in reference to the United States. On the main French page for Amérique it is stated that this word should not be confused with the United States of America. On the German disambiguation page the continental sense precedes the national sense. Repeating this trial with the adjectives American, americano, américain, and Amerikaner produced similar results. This experiment tends to confirm what I thought I knew from experience in my travels and contacts with people from around the world, that outside the USA most people understand the words America, American and their cognates in the continental sense.

- Otomi in pedant mode (sorry, folks, I'll try to lighten up)
Just to add some perspective to the whole Canadian/Irish/American Deep South discussion — the French Canadians were beat to shit by the British/Americans during the French/Indian war; the Irish were beat down for centuries by the Brits (galvanizing Ben Franklin in favor of independence, by the way) and the Confederacy got their asses handed to them by the Yankees (with the help of Irish cannon fodder) during the US Civil War.

Since the wars, all three groups - American Southerners, Irish and French Canadians have been vilified, portrayed as dirty, ignorant, diseased, breeding out of control, marginalized economically, and generally considered morally deficient by the dominating force — this has lasted for Hundreds of Years, through multiple generations — as indicated by the arrogant and imperialistic comments below.

 This is what the song is about.

The Black Crowes - The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, Live

"This is a great cover of a great song. No need to compare to The Band or to The Band's "The Last Waltz". the Crowe's are fantastic, ..and simply just paying homage to one of the best American (Canadian) band's ever to hit a live stage, period. "




 fredriley wrote:

Ah, right. Being an ignoramus the other side of the Pond I was never quite sure what this was about, but figured it was something to do with the war. A shame it's still being fought, going by messages such as the above. That's a bit like some hard-core Irish Republicans still having it in for England on account of what Oliver Cromwell did 3 centuries ago. Regrettably, the map of the world is driven by inter-State warfare and imperialism, and us grunts just have to accept what results. Pining for a forgotten and defeated State from 200 years ago is both pointless and leads to some very dangerous and reactionary revanchism. Let's just deal with what is, not what should have been, and improve our societies from their current state.

 

Hear, hear!
 cosmiclint wrote:

Um, Canadians are "Americans." The United States doesn't get to appropriate the name of the continent we share.

 

This is hilarious.  Canadians throw themselves into fits of high dudgeon whenever a Canadian artist is mistaken for an American, and at the same time they are not a little peeved that the world recognizes the term "American" as a USA citizen. 


Never understood the appeal of these guys.
 Misterfixit wrote:
Sad and tragic story of the War of Northern Aggression.
 
Sorry you lost your slaves.
 finosj wrote:
Levon Helm, who sang "The Night ...", is not Canadian but Arkansan.
 
Just to throw kindling on the amusing Canadian/American debate here - Robbie Robertson wrote the song and he's Canadian.
It's a testament to his skill that he could grow up a couple of hours from Toronto and write something so far from his own experience that a boy from Arkansas could sing like this...

It's the Canadian-American contrast that's a big part of what makes The Band so special so no point debating the fine points.

The Band    {#Clap}

So many great songs: from this album and others...  play them all
 cosmiclint wrote:
Um, Canadians are "Americans." The United States doesn't get to appropriate the name of the continent we share.
 
I think you kind of missed the point. Holborne was simply pointing out that The Band was from Canada, not the U.S.A., and as such the U.S.A. should not refer to them as their own. A valid point I thought. By the same token, we wouldn't take credit for The Doors, CCR, Springsteen and so on. Peace to all you music lovers on either side of the 49th.  {#Meditate}




This song is good for the ears...


 fredriley wrote:

Ah, right. Being an ignoramus the other side of the Pond I was never quite sure what this was about, but figured it was something to do with the war. A shame it's still being fought, going by messages such as the above. That's a bit like some hard-core Irish Republicans still having it in for England on account of what Oliver Cromwell did 3 centuries ago. Regrettably, the map of the world is driven by inter-State warfare and imperialism, and us grunts just have to accept what results. Pining for a forgotten and defeated State from 200 years ago is both pointless and leads to some very dangerous and reactionary revanchism. Let's just deal with what is, not what should have been, and improve our societies from their current state.
 
Well, being an ignoramus living on same side of said pond, but hailing from the Land of Lincoln, it is my opinion one cannot understand the US without understanding the American Civil War, its causes and consequences.  History can be a pain that way.  

BTW, I also happen to believe one cannot understand England today without understanding the English Civil War - but, whatever . . .  

Joan Baez - "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" Live

"...one of the best-loved songs ever recorded about the Civil War: "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" by The Band. The song was first recorded in 1969, and was later covered and/or performed by Joan Baez, Johnny Cash, Jerry Garcia, the Black Crowes, Bruce Hornsby, and the Allman Brothers Band, among others... "

"Great performance by a fine folk singer. I love her clear, silvery vocal tone and clear diction."


Nice song!!
Does this tempo seem awfully slow to anyone else?  Plodding.  And I happen to LIKE the song.  Just not this particular version.
To my mind...this is the definitive version of this fine song.  Levon helm's vocals and that kick-ass horn section sell it!  a classic if ever there was one!
 Misterfixit wrote:
Sad and tragic story of the War of Northern Aggression.
 
Ah, right. Being an ignoramus the other side of the Pond I was never quite sure what this was about, but figured it was something to do with the war. A shame it's still being fought, going by messages such as the above. That's a bit like some hard-core Irish Republicans still having it in for England on account of what Oliver Cromwell did 3 centuries ago. Regrettably, the map of the world is driven by inter-State warfare and imperialism, and us grunts just have to accept what results. Pining for a forgotten and defeated State from 200 years ago is both pointless and leads to some very dangerous and reactionary revanchism. Let's just deal with what is, not what should have been, and improve our societies from their current state.

Did anybody else see that piece on TV recently about Woodstock today?
Levon Helm was on and looked his age(and more).What a great artist.


This is a great classic!  Love it!


 holborne wrote:


No... they're Canadian. They may be "Rock Nobility," but they're not fucking American, and your calling them American doesn't make them American just because you like them. Americans don't get to appropriate everything they like — better learn that now, as US influence in the world continues to drop like a stone.

P.S. Dana Carvey? Wha?
 
Hey, hoss. Point taken. Richard, Rick, Robbie, Garth, and the others were Canadian.

But you have to remember that Levon Helm is from Marvell, AR. He sang a lot for them, they had a folk/bluegrass/funky vibe, and their songs resonated a lot with American youth back in the day. Hell, they still resonate with me and my friends.

So please forgive folks for thinking of The Band as American icons. I personally think that they are a big enough resource for us all to share in and be amazed by. But that's just my opinion.

By the way, read Fareed Zakaria's piece about the Canadian economy. Looks like you all may have the upper hand for the long term future. Your star is ascendant, while ours is on the wane. Take care, neighbor. {#Wave}

Levon Helm, who sang "The Night ...", is not Canadian but Arkansan.
This live version doesn't do the song justice.  Either play the original studio performance or The Last Waltz.  This one sounds phoned-in.
 holborne wrote:


No... they're Canadian. They may be "Rock Nobility," but they're not fucking American, and your calling them American doesn't make them American just because you like them. Americans don't get to appropriate everything they like — better learn that now, as US influence in the world continues to drop like a stone.

P.S. Dana Carvey? Wha?
 
Um, Canadians are "Americans." The United States doesn't get to appropriate the name of the continent we share.

 Rickvee wrote:
Easily one of the greatest songs ever written.
 
Yeah, it's best on paper so you don't have to hear it.
 holborne wrote:


No... they're Canadian. They may be "Rock Nobility," but they're not fucking American, and your calling them American doesn't make them American just because you like them. Americans don't get to appropriate everything they like — better learn that now, as US influence in the world continues to drop like a stone.

P.S. Dana Carvey? Wha?
 
As a world traveller I know that America and Canada share the same culture with very slight differences so you could say  what's theirs is ours and vice-versa.  I would bet successsful Canadian musicians and actors end up in California.

 Stefen wrote:
Do southerners feel that they are discriminated against?
 

Not discriminated against, just automatically thought of as slow and/or lazy. And the assumption that ALL white people from the South are racists. Of course Southerners tend to think of Yankees as rude and over-zelous (sp?) so it balances out.
 jazzface78 wrote:


Uh, I know this ... they're are still American Rock Nobility ... like Neil Young ... and Dana Carvey

 

No... they're Canadian. They may be "Rock Nobility," but they're not fucking American, and your calling them American doesn't make them American just because you like them. Americans don't get to appropriate everything they like — better learn that now, as US influence in the world continues to drop like a stone.

P.S. Dana Carvey? Wha?


 holborne wrote:


Uh...they were Canadian, except for Levon Helm.

 

Uh, I know this ... they're are still American Rock Nobility ... like Neil Young ... and Dana Carvey

 jazzface78 wrote:

{#Boohoo}  American Rock Nobility.  Bow down and weep in celebration for our greatest triumph.   



 

Uh...they were Canadian, except for Levon Helm.

Do southerners feel that they are discriminated against?

{#Boohoo}  American Rock Nobility.  Bow down and weep in celebration for our greatest triumph.   



 Misterfixit wrote:
Sad and tragic story of the War of Northern Aggression.
 
Hahahahahahahahahaha! Still fighting that battle, huh? Keep it up, dude, for all the good it'll do you!

 g-rod wrote:
If possible, I like this better than the studio version. More majestic.

 

Actually, i think this IS the studio version. It's different than the one on "The Last Waltz"—-now THAT one is awesome!

EDIT: I stand corrected—this IS a live version, but not the one from "The Last Waltz".



More of "The Band" Bill! As much as you want from the greatest American rock band ever!
 g-rod wrote:
If possible, I like this better than the studio version. More majestic.
 

have to agree ...
Easily one of the greatest songs ever written.
I was just thinking the same thing. Robertson has written some amazing songs during his career, I was trying to think of a contemporary songwriter who would be capable of writing something of this calibre and I couldn't really come up with anyone.
Sad and tragic story of the War of Northern Aggression.
Easily one of the greatest songs ever written.
Perfect... just perfect!
If possible, I like this better than the studio version. More majestic.
When I was in college, some guy once said to me "I am going to play you the most beautiful song in the world," and he played me this. :lol:
Photo-John wrote:
Yeah. I'll go along with the rest of the sheep here. One of my favorite songs ever. I didn't realize it was a Joan Baez song. I can't imagine it done by anyone but the Band. Awesome.
Wikipedia says that Robbie Robertson wrote the song and Joan Baez covered it... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Night_They_Drove_Old_Dixie_Down " 'The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down' is a song written by Robbie Robertson, first recorded by The Band in 1969 and released on their self-titled second album." ... "The song spawned a handful of cover versions, notably Joan Baez's top-10 version from 1971, as well as one by Richie Havens. Johnny Cash covered the song on his 1975 album John R. Cash. In addition, it was a live staple of Jerry Garcia's various solo configurations."
One of the great ones!
I didn't grow up with the song, having first heard it on an SNL retrospective in the late 80s, and I can still remember being mesmerized by the music. "Wow ..." It no doubt helped that we were studying the Civil War at the time. A great, great song. 10.