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Shantala — Purnamadah
Album: The Love Window
Avg rating:
7.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 769









Released: 2003
Length: 5:20
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Om
Purnamadah purnamidam
Purnaat purna-mudacyate
Purnasya purna-maadaaya purnamevaa-vashisyate
Om
Shanti shanti shanti

Om
Purnamadah purnamidam
Purnaat purna-mudacyate
Purnasya purna-maadaaya purnamevaa-vashisyate
Om
Shanti shanti shanti
Comments (30)add comment
👍
 kaustav wrote:

This is so beautiful. As a Hindu brought up in the Chinmaya Mission, I feel utmost peace and joy when listening to this piece.

Hindu scriptures are descriptive, prescriptive and narrative, but not mandatory or injunctive in their nature. There is no specific meter, tune or accent that must be mandatorily used to recite mantras. All that is requested, is that you do so with a pure heart and clean pronunciation, to the best of your ability, as a seeker. You and the others around you will then derive the best benefits from that effort.

For those who are interested: the word 'Poornam' in Sanskrit has two meanings: infinity and completeness. This is essential to understanding Sanatana Dharmic philosophical thought - we view life as cyclical and circular. 

Literally, this couplet therefore can be translated in two ways. 

The first translation depicts the mathematical concept of infinity. In summary, the couplet says: "When infinity is subtracted from infinity, infinity remains."

The second translation carries a much deeper spiritual and philosophical meaning:
Poornam adah - 'that' is infinity. The word 'that' refer to the Paramatma, the eternal soul or objective cosmic infinity.
Poornam idam - 'this' is infinity.  The word 'this' refers to the jeevatma, the individual soul or subjective infinite experience.
Poornat poornam udachyate - from one infinity arises the other infinity. Please note that there is no specific causality indicated here - the causality works well in either direction.
Poornasya poornam aadaya - when one infinity is removed from the other,
Poornam eva avashishyate - only infinity remains.

The couplet draws a direct line between the individual subjective experience and the cosmic objective experience, and asserts that each is an infinity in its own sense, giving rise to the other, and thus completing the circle of life.

May all find peace in this realisation.
Om Tat Sat



Thank you for this beautiful description.
A long segment of pleasant, calming music. 
Thanks again, Bill
just bumped from 7 -> 8...so nice first thing in the morning, so calming.
One of my favorite yoga instructors uses this in a playlist.  Fits so well. 
 kaustav wrote:

This is so beautiful. As a Hindu brought up in the Chinmaya Mission, I feel utmost peace and joy when listening to this piece.

Hindu scriptures are descriptive, prescriptive and narrative, but not mandatory or injunctive in their nature. There is no specific meter, tune or accent that must be mandatorily used to recite mantras. All that is requested, is that you do so with a pure heart and clean pronunciation, to the best of your ability, as a seeker. You and the others around you will then derive the best benefits from that effort.

For those who are interested: the word 'Poornam' in Sanskrit has two meanings: infinity and completeness. This is essential to understanding Sanatana Dharmic philosophical thought - we view life as cyclical and circular. 

Literally, this couplet therefore can be translated in two ways. 

The first translation depicts the mathematical concept of infinity. In summary, the couplet says: "When infinity is subtracted from infinity, infinity remains."

The second translation carries a much deeper spiritual and philosophical meaning:
Poornam adah - 'that' is infinity. The word 'that' refer to the Paramatma, the eternal soul or objective cosmic infinity.
Poornam idam - 'this' is infinity.  The word 'this' refers to the jeevatma, the individual soul or subjective infinite experience.
Poornat poornam udachyate - from one infinity arises the other infinity. Please note that there is no specific causality indicated here - the causality works well in either direction.
Poornasya poornam aadaya - when one infinity is removed from the other,
Poornam eva avashishyate - only infinity remains.

The couplet draws a direct line between the individual subjective experience and the cosmic objective experience, and asserts that each is an infinity in its own sense, giving rise to the other, and thus completing the circle of life.

May all find peace in this realisation.
Om Tat Sat



Thank you.
 racingcirc wrote:

Hindi is my first language and I learned Sanskrit (the language of the lyrics of this song) in school starting at the age of 11. From my perspective, it deeply saddens me to listen to these revered ancient chants sung in the unmistakable accent of an outsider. One who happens to be a caucasian woman, and to whom this culture and tradition is perhaps nothing more than exotic and "cool".

Colonianism was bad. But cultural appropriation can be equally disempowering to my people. At least it is to me.


As an English person should I be annoyed if I hear someone speaking with a French accent?  Singing a hymn with a distinctly German twang?  Reciting the Bible with an Indian accent?  Of course not.  Moreover, your assumption that the "caucasian woman" has no reverence for the culture and tradition is baseless.  Your entire post speaks of someone looking for offence and, mirabile dictu, finding it.

tl;dr cultural appropriation is a load of hooey.
 racingcirc wrote:

Hindi is my first language and I learned Sanskrit (the language of the lyrics of this song) in school starting at the age of 11. From my perspective, it deeply saddens me to listen to these revered ancient chants sung in the unmistakable accent of an outsider. One who happens to be a caucasian woman, and to whom this culture and tradition is perhaps nothing more than exotic and "cool".

Colonianism was bad. But cultural appropriation can be equally disempowering to my people. At least it is to me.



The spiritual teachings of India were brought to the west by Ramakrishna/Vivekananda, Yukteshwar/Yogananda, Nityananda/Muktanda, and others, as big part of their divine mission.  The fact that it has caught on here only speaks to the success of their mission.  The difference in pronunciation and style is bound to happen, as we are not natives to India.  Perhaps you can take it as support and appreciation for the tremendous depths that your country offers the world.
 kaustav wrote:

This is so beautiful. As a Hindu brought up in the Chinmaya Mission, I feel utmost peace and joy when listening to this piece.

Hindu scriptures are descriptive, prescriptive and narrative, but not mandatory or injunctive in their nature. There is no specific meter, tune or accent that must be mandatorily used to recite mantras. All that is requested, is that you do so with a pure heart and clean pronunciation, to the best of your ability, as a seeker. You and the others around you will then derive the best benefits from that effort.

For those who are interested: the word 'Poornam' in Sanskrit has two meanings: infinity and completeness. This is essential to understanding Sanatana Dharmic philosophical thought - we view life as cyclical and circular. 

Literally, this couplet therefore can be translated in two ways. 

The first translation depicts the mathematical concept of infinity. In summary, the couplet says: "When infinity is subtracted from infinity, infinity remains."

The second translation carries a much deeper spiritual and philosophical meaning:
Poornam adah - 'that' is infinity. The word 'that' refer to the Paramatma, the eternal soul or objective cosmic infinity.
Poornam idam - 'this' is infinity.  The word 'this' refers to the jeevatma, the individual soul or subjective infinite experience.
Poornat poornam udachyate - from one infinity arises the other infinity. Please note that there is no specific causality indicated here - the causality works well in either direction.
Poornasya poornam aadaya - when one infinity is removed from the other,
Poornam eva avashishyate - only infinity remains.

The couplet draws a direct line between the individual subjective experience and the cosmic objective experience, and asserts that each is an infinity in its own sense, giving rise to the other, and thus completing the circle of life.

May all find peace in this realisation.
Om Tat Sat


Thanks for this great explanation. I do yoga and sometimes the teacher plays this tune, have always wondered about it :)

Namaste
This is why I listen to radio paradise always something new to explore
What a wonderful surprising track. Hello RP! Thank you 
this is  a perfect example of how music can transcend borders, culture, and even time . . .
Some comments should be left inside to ponder one's struggle with loneliness...
reminds me of "We don't need no education..." - just me?
This track sings me to sleep at night. A beautiful and gentle lullaby. I don't much care what she's talking about, to me these are magic words.
 sfyi2001 wrote:
'PERHAPS' the ancient chants are not as revered as you think.
'PERHAPS' very few would hear them if not for an artist such as Purnamadah. 
Freedom to perform these 'revered ancient chants' belongs to all -
Perhaps you should cut a sanskrit record from your deep, sad, mongolian perspective.
Or perhaps your fixation with "cultural appropriation" cripples you creatively?

YIKES!!  I think sfyi2001 was on the verge of making a valid point, but it is so badly mired in the insulting language used -- against racingcirc and against the entirely of the Eastern world -- that it is rendered nothing more than another distasteful diatribe.  (I think you can do better, sfyi2001.)

The comment posted by kaustav does a much better job; perhaps sharing some enlightenment for racingcirc as well as for all the rest of us.

 kaustav wrote:

This is so beautiful. As a Hindu brought up in the Chinmaya Mission, I feel utmost peace and joy when listening to this piece.

Hindu scriptures are descriptive, prescriptive and narrative, but not mandatory or injunctive in their nature. There is no specific meter, tune or accent that must be mandatorily used to recite mantras. All that is requested, is that you do so with a pure heart and clean pronunciation, to the best of your ability, as a seeker. You and the others around you will then derive the best benefits from that effort.

For those who are interested: the word 'Poornam' in Sanskrit has two meanings: infinity and completeness. This is essential to understanding Sanatana Dharmic philosophical thought - we view life as cyclical and circular. 

Literally, this couplet therefore can be translated in two ways. 

The first translation depicts the mathematical concept of infinity. In summary, the couplet says: "When infinity is subtracted from infinity, infinity remains."

The second translation carries a much deeper spiritual and philosophical meaning:
Poornam adah - 'that' is infinity. The word 'that' refer to the Paramatma, the eternal soul or objective cosmic infinity.
Poornam idam - 'this' is infinity.  The word 'this' refers to the jeevatma, the individual soul or subjective infinite experience.
Poornat poornam udachyate - from one infinity arises the other infinity. Please note that there is no specific causality indicated here - the causality works well in either direction.
Poornasya poornam aadaya - when one infinity is removed from the other,
Poornam eva avashishyate - only infinity remains.

The couplet draws a direct line between the individual subjective experience and the cosmic objective experience, and asserts that each is an infinity in its own sense, giving rise to the other, and thus completing the circle of life.

May all find peace in this realisation.
Om Tat Sat


As clear as the music and chant.  Thank you.
Beautiful!
lovely cover with nice instrument composition in western style with harmonies. My only gripe is they could have put some more effort in the enunciation of the beautiful sanskrit language. Thank god for the flute. Saved the whole endeavour by a landslide.
 racingcirc wrote:

Hindi is my first language and I learned Sanskrit (the language of the lyrics of this song) in school starting at the age of 11. From my perspective, it deeply saddens me to listen to these revered ancient chants sung in the unmistakable accent of an outsider. One who happens to be a caucasian woman, and to whom this culture and tradition is perhaps nothing more than exotic and "cool".

Colonianism was bad. But cultural appropriation can be equally disempowering to my people. At least it is to me.



Should you be able to Mozart? I think you should be able to, but...
This is so beautiful. As a Hindu brought up in the Chinmaya Mission, I feel utmost peace and joy when listening to this piece.

Hindu scriptures are descriptive, prescriptive and narrative, but not mandatory or injunctive in their nature. There is no specific meter, tune or accent that must be mandatorily used to recite mantras. All that is requested, is that you do so with a pure heart and clean pronunciation, to the best of your ability, as a seeker. You and the others around you will then derive the best benefits from that effort.

For those who are interested: the word 'Poornam' in Sanskrit has two meanings: infinity and completeness. This is essential to understanding Sanatana Dharmic philosophical thought - we view life as cyclical and circular. 

Literally, this couplet therefore can be translated in two ways. 

The first translation depicts the mathematical concept of infinity. In summary, the couplet says: "When infinity is subtracted from infinity, infinity remains."

The second translation carries a much deeper spiritual and philosophical meaning:
Poornam adah - 'that' is infinity. The word 'that' refer to the Paramatma, the eternal soul or objective cosmic infinity.
Poornam idam - 'this' is infinity.  The word 'this' refers to the jeevatma, the individual soul or subjective infinite experience.
Poornat poornam udachyate - from one infinity arises the other infinity. Please note that there is no specific causality indicated here - the causality works well in either direction.
Poornasya poornam aadaya - when one infinity is removed from the other,
Poornam eva avashishyate - only infinity remains.

The couplet draws a direct line between the individual subjective experience and the cosmic objective experience, and asserts that each is an infinity in its own sense, giving rise to the other, and thus completing the circle of life.

May all find peace in this realisation.
Om Tat Sat
 racingcirc wrote:

Hindi is my first language and I learned Sanskrit (the language of the lyrics of this song) in school starting at the age of 11. From my perspective, it deeply saddens me to listen to these revered ancient chants sung in the unmistakable accent of an outsider. One who happens to be a caucasian woman, and to whom this culture and tradition is perhaps nothing more than exotic and "cool".

Colonianism was bad. But cultural appropriation can be equally disempowering to my people. At least it is to me.


Such a complex issue. Cultural appropriation is so common and goes in both directions, from colonizer to the colonized and back again, or across cultures. There are so many cases where "cultural appropriation" has resulted in wonderful new art forms, and often it is a form of appreciation for the original.

But this song? This song is just plain cringe-worthy. They do so little to the original form except to rob it of any life and vibrancy. Bland pablum. 
 racingcirc wrote:
Hindi is my first language and I learned Sanskrit (the language of the lyrics of this song) in school starting at the age of 11. From my perspective, it deeply saddens me to listen to these revered ancient chants sung in the unmistakable accent of an outsider. One who happens to be a caucasian woman, and to whom this culture and tradition is perhaps nothing more than exotic and "cool".

Colonianism was bad. But cultural appropriation can be equally disempowering to my people. At least it is to me.
 
As someone from a Christian tradition, should I feel similarly disempowered if I hear someone saying The Lord's Prayer in a foreign accent?
Lovely.  Yes, it is another new artist brought to my attention while listening to RP.
Soothing & Relaxing
 racingcirc wrote:
Hindi is my first language and I learned Sanskrit (the language of the lyrics of this song) in school starting at the age of 11. From my perspective, it deeply saddens me to listen to these revered ancient chants sung in the unmistakable accent of an outsider. One who happens to be a caucasian woman, and to whom this culture and tradition is perhaps nothing more than exotic and "cool".

Colonianism was bad. But cultural appropriation can be equally disempowering to my people. At least it is to me.
 

'PERHAPS' the ancient chants are not as revered as you think.
'PERHAPS' very few would hear them if not for an artist such as Purnamadah. 
Freedom to perform these 'revered ancient chants' belongs to all -
Perhaps you should cut a sanskrit record from your deep, sad, mongolian perspective.
Or perhaps your fixation with "cultural appropriation" cripples you creatively?


Hindi is my first language and I learned Sanskrit (the language of the lyrics of this song) in school starting at the age of 11. From my perspective, it deeply saddens me to listen to these revered ancient chants sung in the unmistakable accent of an outsider. One who happens to be a caucasian woman, and to whom this culture and tradition is perhaps nothing more than exotic and "cool".

Colonianism was bad. But cultural appropriation can be equally disempowering to my people. At least it is to me.
 stephen.king12101 wrote:
What a nice surprise ! Her music is wonderful for yoga meditation and relaxed listening Thanks Bill
 
Agreed!! At least, the relaxed part!! Almost ethereal. Mmmm....✌️
What a nice surprise ! Her music is wonderful for yoga meditation and relaxed listening Thanks Bill
 Bakaretsu wrote:
 
Just sit back and relax....
Try This Link

https://shantalamusic.com/