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Jethro Tull — Hymn 43
Album: Aqualung
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 521









Released: 1971
Length: 3:14
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Oh father high in heaven
smile down upon your son
whose busy with his money games
his women and his gun.
Oh Jesus save me!

And the unsung Western hero
killed an Indian or three
and made his name in Hollywood
to set the white man free.
Oh Jesus save me!

If Jesus saves
well, He'd better save Himself
from the gory glory seekers
who use His name in death.
Oh Jesus save me!

I saw him in the city
and on the mountains of the moon
His cross was rather bloody
He could hardly roll His stone.
Oh Jesus save me!
Comments (28)add comment
This would require someone with access to more historical info than I can find, but back in 1971 I was working on digging a ditch in front of our family's house in a Cleveland, Ohio suburb (a city best forgotten). I was listening to the local rock station, when Cleveland was one of the cities where new music was premiered. The dj announced a new release by Jethro Tull and stated that this was the American premier of the album. I clearly recall the song Aqualung and being impressed. What I don't know is if this was truly the first American radio play. Back when FM radio broke important music and it mattered. There was a war overseas, easy for many to ignore, and there was a sort of fermenting essence in the air (as seen from the future) that was expressed in a lingering burst of musical creativity that seems likely to never be experienced again.
 Proclivities wrote:

Nipsey Russell?  Actually, I think it was this guy.



Jethro looks so much better on his wiki page than on the album cover. He's really gone to seed by 1971 apparently. 
+1 to 9, the music's great but those verses are so up my alley - LLRP!!
 jbuhl wrote:

This Album recently was remastered by the engineer from Porcupine Tree, his name escapes me.  He is renowned and respected for no frills remasters that only seeks to enhance the original sound and not add any unnecessary frill.  

Should be a target for any Tull fan out there.
 


Not the engineer but the principal songwriter, producer and singer, Steven Wilson.  He's had a pretty good second career remixing classic albums for, among others, Yes, XTC and King Crimson.
Oh yes!!! 
First album I ever bought with the five bucks my dad gave at some store. Took it home, he insisted on listening to it all the way through with me and, to his credit, said "That's good shit."
 kingart wrote:
Who was the inspiration namesake of Jethro Tull? 
 

 

Jethro Tull was an English agricultural pioneer from Berkshire who helped bring about the British Agricultural Revolution. He perfected a horse-drawn seed drill in 1700 that economically sowed the seeds in neat rows. He later developed a horse-drawn hoe. Tull's methods were adopted by many great landowners and helped to provide the basis for modern agriculture.

That is who he was, an important person to be sure,  but I don't know why his name was chosen by a bunch of blues-rock musicians.

the drive, the over the top drums, the lyrics........this is heavy as heavy gets, 10/10
 jbuhl wrote:
This Album recently was remastered by the engineer from Porcupine Tree, his name escapes me.  He is renowned and respected for no frills remasters that only seeks to enhance the original sound and not add any unnecessary frill.  

Should be a target for any Tull fan out there.
 

 
I picked up a copy of the remastered album and it was impressively well done.  A few extra tracks added for good measure.
And to think Ian Anderson was just 23 at the time this was recorded and already had Stand Up and Benefit under his belt. This was my favorite album in 1972 along with the Allman Bros. Band at Fillmore East. The remastering was done by Steven Wilson who had also done the XTC catalog and others.
A ROCK Masterpiece
 jbuhl wrote:
This Album recently was remastered by the engineer from Porcupine Tree, his name escapes me.  He is renowned and respected for no frills remasters that only seeks to enhance the original sound and not add any unnecessary frill.  

Should be a target for any Tull fan out there.
 

 
Yes and that should be the goal of any re-master. Let the original recording come through as much as possible, not editorialize great albums.
 kingart wrote:
Who was the inspiration namesake of Jethro Tull? 
 
Nipsey Russell?  Actually, I think it was this guy.
This Album recently was remastered by the engineer from Porcupine Tree, his name escapes me.  He is renowned and respected for no frills remasters that only seeks to enhance the original sound and not add any unnecessary frill.  

Should be a target for any Tull fan out there.
 
Who was the inspiration namesake of Jethro Tull? 
 
This was great in its day and still stands up. The muted guitar rhythm was kind of unique at the time.
 Bert7 wrote:
Am I the only guy who owns this album? Rock & Roll{#Eyes}

 
Hold on a sec....(runs down into basement, rummages around and...after blowing off a ton of dust...finds...)....nope.  You're not alone.  {#Motor}

Highlow
American Net'Zen
There's been a strong showing of Tull over the past few days. THANK YOU!!!!!
The soundtrack to my youth...
I heard this song for the first time like 20 years ago, and still every time I listen to it I cannot believe how good it is... {#Dancingbanana_2}
8-track tape heaven
 Bert7 wrote:
Am I the only guy who owns this album? Rock & Roll{#Eyes}

 
Nope. {#Guitarist}
Love it! Always did! They were not afraid to stun The Establishment, and made their clever digs with astounding musicality and theater!
10!
this tune cooks
 Lazarus wrote: 
I am voting for you...
Am I the only guy who owns this album? Rock & Roll{#Eyes}
righteous!