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Elton John — Come Down in Time
Album: Tumbleweed Connection
Avg rating:
7.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 712









Released: 1970
Length: 3:22
Plays (last 30 days): 1
In the quiet silent seconds I turned off the light switch
And I came down to meet you in the half light the moon left
While a cluster of night jars sang some songs out of tune
A mantle of bright light shone down from a room

Come down in time I still hear her say
So clear in my ear like it was today
Come down in time was the message she gave
Come down in time and I'll meet you half way

Well I don't know if I should have heard her as yet
But a true love like hers is a hard love to get
And I've walked most all the way and I ain't heard her call
And I'm getting to thinking if she's coming at all

Come down in time I still hear her say
So clear in my ear like it was today
Come down in time was the message she gave
Come down in time and I'll meet you half way

There are women and women and some hold you tight
While some leave you counting the stars in the night
Comments (58)add comment
 Andy_B wrote:
This original release, brown-cover album was stolen from me at a party about a year after I got it,...one of the more major losses from my album collection.  I still miss it and consider it to be one of his best.
 

Maybe the Gods were reading this post above as shortly after I posted this I found the original album complete with the paper insert (pictures/comments) at a small botique in Flagler Beach, Fl  It is in very good condition and I paid only $3.00.   Finding it made my day.
 George_Tirebiter wrote:
{#Bananapiano}I got married to my high school sweetheart in April 1971.  Our honeymoon consisted of driving From Buffalo, NY to San Diego where I was stationed (US Navy) at the time.  We had a small tape player and listened to this album a lot during the drive.  We're still going strong after 44 years, and the album means more now than it did then.  This is one of the great songs from that album, and a great example of EJ's superb early work with Bernie Taupin.  Play on....


 

Thanks for sharing that!  Music frozen in a great memory.
Strange what age does to a person: I listened and hated this album in the '70's, when I was 18. Now I'm quite fond of it, and probably wouldn't care to listen to the EJ tunes that I liked then!
I think this album is his finest work by far and one of those rare albums that flows so smoothly start to finish.  A masterpiece!
 ThePoose wrote:
This LP is a masterpiece...and we have that great Canadian band, The Band, to thank for the motivation behind it.
 
How so?
This LP is a masterpiece...and we have that great Canadian band, The Band, to thank for the motivation behind it.
My favorite track off my favorite Elton John album.   Love that pensive oboe and the yearning in his voice.  
 folkrocker wrote:

I'll second that!
 
Thanks for the reminder! Just pulled out the vinyl and looked at the booklet!
Great album for sure.
So beautiful.  Makes you just stop and listen...
 WonderLizard wrote:
What I love is the British railway station masquerading as something vaguely western American, possibly a train station. Regardless of whatever drove John and Taupin, the album is a masterpiece, perhaps an apotheosis of their work.
 

The British railway station on the cover of this album was opened in 1862.

It is not masquerading as anything other than... an old railway station!


 
 WonderLizard wrote:
What I love is the British railway station masquerading as something vaguely western American, possibly a train station. Regardless of whatever drove John and Taupin, the album is a masterpiece, perhaps an apotheosis of their work.
 
Bernie was (is?) fascinated with the American West, particularly the Civil War (My Father's Gun, et al). One of several recurring themes in his work. Many of his lyrics are more like collages of images, rather than a single narrative. This song holds together better than some, yet is still open to interpretation. But yes, this album is indeed a masterpiece. 

There's a two-disc set of this album that includes alternate tracks. For die hard fans it's worth a listen or three.

Funny thing, whenever I see a still shot from 'Once Upon A Time In The West', I think of this album. Utterly unrelated, I know. But the imagery is similar. Doesn't hurt to see Claudia Cardinale again either...
c.
{#Devil_pimp}zesty ! great song great album !
 Funkybro wrote:
Then you are on crack
 
{#Roflol}
 GeorgeMWoods wrote:
Time has not been kind to this song. 

 
Then you are on crack
Good song, great album.
What I love is the British railway station masquerading as something vaguely western American, possibly a train station. Regardless of whatever drove John and Taupin, the album is a masterpiece, perhaps an apotheosis of their work.
 MediaGrrl wrote:
The Sting cover of this from "Two Rooms" is lovely - I think I prefer it.

Blasphemy, I know.

 
Sure, the original has some dated orchestration and the Sting version is a lot cleaner but come on, we just don't hear enough bassoon in rock music anymore!
Masterpiece is a word I don't like to throw around very often so I won't use it to describe this song. ...but it is a fantastic creation nonetheless.
The Sting cover of this from "Two Rooms" is lovely - I think I prefer it.

Blasphemy, I know.
 SanFranGayMan wrote:
This album and his Elton John album represent what an inflective time that was, with the Viet Nam war swirling around, the inflection psychedelics and weed provided-the conflict of so much family who thought of themselves as patriots and us as less thans. These albums for me were shelters from the storm, a chance to get grounded and reassured when we were facing headwinds much larger than we were. And all the more remarkable that he and Bernie wrote about an environment-the South-without being there. Simply, quite stunning. Our poets...

 

Bernie Taupin was obsessed with the American South, particularly the Civil War. 'My Father's Gun' is a great example. Not to mention obsessions with death and dying, as in 'Where To Now St. Peter?'

The other recurring theme from their collaboration seems to be autobiographical: the City Boy and the Country Boy. Captain Fantastic, GYBR, Honky Cat, etc.

TC holds up as an incredible piece of work. I put it on about once a month.

Another very underrated album was 'Blue Moves'. Not in the same league as this, but surprisingly good.
c.
In the early seventies at my house we used to call this 'The Brown Album' as opposed to 'Madman Across the Water' which was 'The Blue Album'. "Which one you wanna' hear, the brown or the blue album?"
 NorthernLad wrote:
The art direction of the original vinyl is the best I have ever seen.  The gate-fold sleeve, the photos, the big booklet of lyrics, soaked in the old west of America. 

Elton and Bernie's best album, full stop.

Image result for tumbleweed connection vinyl record

 
I'll second that!
 jbarryc wrote:
An extraordinary song from his greatest record-IMO

 
Ditto. {#Clap}
 Stephen_Phillips wrote:
I haven't liked Elton John or his music for a very long time but this song and the album reminds me why I once liked him in the early 70's. Tumbleweed Connection was and still is excellent.

 
I'll second and third that.
Time has not been kind to this song. 
Elton and Bernie at their best
The art direction of the original vinyl is the best I have ever seen.  The gate-fold sleeve, the photos, the big booklet of lyrics, soaked in the old west of America. 

Elton and Bernie's best album, full stop.

Image result for tumbleweed connection vinyl record
Elton spotted in Vancouver, BC, Canada yesterday updating his vinyl collection.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/elton-john-beat-street-records-1.4018502
This album and his Elton John album represent what an inflective time that was, with the Viet Nam war swirling around, the inflection psychedelics and weed provided-the conflict of so much family who thought of themselves as patriots and us as less thans. These albums for me were shelters from the storm, a chance to get grounded and reassured when we were facing headwinds much larger than we were. And all the more remarkable that he and Bernie wrote about an environment-the South-without being there. Simply, quite stunning. Our poets...
This is a lovely piece - one of Elton John's best. I didn't realize til now that  it has an oboe in it.  This album and his Madman Across the Water were his zenith.



 Dahlia_Gumbo wrote:
Didn't think I liked EJ, but I do like this. Life is full of surprises — where've I been?
 
Early Elton John is fabulous stuff.
Didn't think I liked EJ, but I do like this. Life is full of surprises -- where've I been?
Had why ear and thumbs up
I think this is his best album, and my favourite.  Not a bad track on it.

I believe I read somewhere that he considers it his favourite.  (could be wrong, though) 
I haven't liked Elton John or his music for a very long time but this song and the album reminds me why I once liked him in the early 70's. Tumbleweed Connection was and still is excellent.
My parents had this album, among many, in the 70s. I loved it when I discovered it in my very early teens one summer, using my Dad's head phones.

probably one of my favorite John tunes...and a terrific album, too...


If you can find this album in the hi-rez/multi-channel version, and you have any vague liking for it.... buy the disc,  an aural amazement
 
 Shaken_Bake wrote:
Goosebumps.  Loved this song way back when and haven't heard it in forever.  Beautiful.
 
The sentiments echoed, totally.
Early EJ was so good. After Yellow Brick Road I never spent any $$ or time listening but this era was really good.
Goosebumps.  Loved this song way back when and haven't heard it in forever.  Beautiful.
What a great album.  Thanks for playing this one.
Thank you for bringing this lost treasure back into my life tonight!
Nono.. just NO. You ruin the song Elton, CUT!
This original release, brown-cover album was stolen from me at a party about a year after I got it,...one of the more major losses from my album collection.  I still miss it and consider it to be one of his best.
one of my favorite songs from my fave EJ album. i don't know why i love it so much (the times?) but it stands the test of time for me. <3
 
Two excellent choices! Cool sister indeed!

Haven't listened to this in a long long time....

 
tkosh wrote:
I was a senior in high school, and my sister, who was a senior in college, gave me this album.  She was so cool!  Well, she still is at 66..  She also gave me "Then Play On," by Fleetwood Mac.  She was so cool!   Great song..

 


Wow, this is an EJ song that actually has no piano.  Credit to Gus Dudgeon, who was responsible for so much of that early EJ sound.

Maybe there are others without piano.  Maybe Sixty Years On ?
An extraordinary song from his greatest record-IMO
I was a senior in high school, and my sister, who was a senior in college, gave me this album.  She was so cool!  Well, she still is at 66..  She also gave me "Then Play On," by Fleetwood Mac.  She was so cool!   Great song..

{#Bananapiano}

I got married to my high school sweetheart in April 1971.  Our honeymoon consisted of driving From Buffalo, NY to San Diego where I was stationed (US Navy) at the time.  We had a small tape player and listened to this album a lot during the drive.  We're still going strong after 44 years, and the album means more now than it did then.  This is one of the great songs from that album, and a great example of EJ's superb early work with Bernie Taupin.  Play on....


Great album!
Nice.  Good tune from a great album.
Always loved this.  Just great.
Lovely song—John and Taupin at their best.
Can't believe this great song wasn't already in the library...