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Suzanne Vega — Fool's Complaint
Album: Tales from the Realm of the Queen of Pentacles
Avg rating:
6.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 307









Released: 2014
Length: 2:33
Plays (last 30 days): 0
How I hate the Queen of Pentacles!
Sitting on her golden throne
In her domestic tyranny
All roads lead back to her alone.

The whole wide world
Is a great big drain
With the vortex as her heart.
All her needs and wants
Wishes and whims
Take precedence on this chart.

But what do I know?
My card's the fool, the fool, the fool
That merry rootless man.
With air beneath his footstep
And providence as his plan.
Providence as his plan.

Oh it's such expensive innocence!
Never knowing any cost.
She throws around her finery
For us to fetch when it gets lost.
She's on the golden platform.
I'm down here in the fields.
I wage my way through the kitchen
Salting her next meal.

But what do I know?
My card's the Fool! The fool the fool.
That merry rootless man.
WIth air beneath my footstep
And providence as my plan.
Providence as my plan.

But what do I know?
I'm just the Fool! The fool the fool.
That merry rootless man.
WIth air beneath my footstep
And providence as my plan.
Providence as my plan.
Comments (10)add comment
Day in Day out - Vega Vega Vega - NO MORE!!!
 calypsus_1 wrote:


In pop-music circles, Suzanne Vega is known almost entirely for two songs from the late 1980s: the child-abuse ballad "Luka" and a song that launched literally dozens of dance remixes, "Tom's Diner." But Vega has been making vital, inventive music the entire time — much of it folk-based, though her sound has taken many smart detours along the way — and is about to put out her first album of original material in seven years, Tales From the Realm of the Queen of Pentacles. The challenge, then, lies in capturing a snapshot of her career in only four songs.

For this Tiny Desk Concert — performed with her brilliant guitarist and producer, Gerry Leonard — Vega splits the difference evenly between old and new, bookending her set with the aforementioned classics and tucking two about-to-be-released songs in the middle. Game and good-spirited throughout, Vega performed "Luka" and "Tom's Diner" as if she hadn't played them thousands of times before — aided greatly by Leonard, who's worked extensively with David Bowie and lends these songs an extraordinary amount of color and texture. (Check out the "bells" he adds near the end of "Tom's Diner.")

Vega's songwriting gifts haven't waned at any point in her long career, and the new songs here — taken from a concept album about the way our world and the spiritual realm intersect — sound as sharp as anything she's done. It only makes sense that, nearly 30 years after her debut, she still examines new realms with grace, empathy and an explorer's spirit.
—STEPHEN THOMPSON, on Feb 10, 2014.

 
Thank you, Calypsus_1!
 eroz wrote:

Suzanne Vega has produced some good music and this one isn't bad. I'd like it if she could actually sing though.



 
While you're at it, wish that water was actually wet.
It's all great for me this morning.  Classic after classic.
My Name is Luka - 30 years later - no thanks...

Suzanne Vega has produced some good music and this one isn't bad. I'd like it if she could actually sing though.



Thank you calypsus!  Smart song, with smart reading to accompany it


In pop-music circles, Suzanne Vega is known almost entirely for two songs from the late 1980s: the child-abuse ballad "Luka" and a song that launched literally dozens of dance remixes, "Tom's Diner." But Vega has been making vital, inventive music the entire time — much of it folk-based, though her sound has taken many smart detours along the way — and is about to put out her first album of original material in seven years, Tales From the Realm of the Queen of Pentacles. The challenge, then, lies in capturing a snapshot of her career in only four songs.

For this Tiny Desk Concert — performed with her brilliant guitarist and producer, Gerry Leonard — Vega splits the difference evenly between old and new, bookending her set with the aforementioned classics and tucking two about-to-be-released songs in the middle. Game and good-spirited throughout, Vega performed "Luka" and "Tom's Diner" as if she hadn't played them thousands of times before — aided greatly by Leonard, who's worked extensively with David Bowie and lends these songs an extraordinary amount of color and texture. (Check out the "bells" he adds near the end of "Tom's Diner.")

Vega's songwriting gifts haven't waned at any point in her long career, and the new songs here — taken from a concept album about the way our world and the spiritual realm intersect — sound as sharp as anything she's done. It only makes sense that, nearly 30 years after her debut, she still examines new realms with grace, empathy and an explorer's spirit.
—STEPHEN THOMPSON, on Feb 10, 2014.


Heard it from the other room, and thought, "Hey, that sounds like -- " Was surprised Suzanne Vega has something new out... Pretty good!