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Beck — Blue Moon
Album: Morning Phase
Avg rating:
7.4

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2090









Released: 2014
Length: 3:56
Plays (last 30 days): 5
I'm so tired of being alone
These penitent walls are all I've known
Songbird calling across the water
Inside my silent asylum

Oh don't leave me on my own
Left me standing all alone
Cut me down to size so I can fit inside
Lies that will divide us both in time

See the turncoat on his knees
A vagabond that no one sees
When a moon is throwing shadows
You can't save the ones you've caught in battle

Oh don't leave me on my own
Left me standing all alone
Cut me down to size so I can fit inside
Lies you try to hide behind your eyes

Don't leave me on my own
Don't leave me on my own
So cut me down to size so I can fit inside
Lies that will divide us both in time
Comments (109)add comment
 crogers wrote:
As a relatively new reader of RP comments (after getting furloughed last year for too short a time), I must say it is good to hear from Proclivities...hope that he/she is still around. Always love the variety of comments, opinions. And Beck is quite interesting, too...Hey Guero!

 Rockit9 wrote:

SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO good

 This is so goooooooood. Emphasis on "good" not "so." Fixed it for ya'!

crogers wrote:
Good to hear from you, Proc -

I
suppose that one could use the term "bigoted" that broadly, but I think
there's a not-so-subtle difference between fanatical atheists who feel
more rational and learned than the believers around them (and need to
tell them so) and rational, learned people rejecting religion and/or
faith because they have no need of superstition for comfort or ancient
writings for behavior guidance. One becomes more rational and learned
through education, experience and experimentation, coupled with a
voracious appetite for substantiation of both facts and ideas and a mind
open enough to avoid simply rejecting out of hand any reasonably
plausible explanation of experiential phenomena.

Maybe I do
spend too much time examining it. Of course, when discussing belief
without plugging in the compassionate but slippery Perspective variable, it *is*
all crazy. I see superstition as the ugly child of fear and ignorance —
and it's a needy, whiny, negative little bastard that, if allowed to
grow unchecked in the human psyche, self-replicates and replaces
positive things like confidence, self-determination, skepticism and even
curiosity with more fear and ignorance. The quality of ones judgement
becomes tainted, decisions get made for the wrong reasons and people
suffer. Basing one's view of their place in the universe on a raft of
superstitions looks to me like an unhealthy, self-defeating, dangerous
way of going about things. For example, the Mayans had some interesting ideas. For that matter, so do suicide bombers.

Fear
and ignorance or confidence and knowledge? Lazy slave to someone
else's ancient ideas or a willingness to work hard to develop your own
brutally honest understanding of what life really is? Is it bigotry to
wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded,
forward-looking human race? Perhaps it is, depending on your
Perspective...
There are those people who use their
faith to inspire them to compassionate action. Even as one might
disagree with some parts of their faith (me & Billy Graham for
example), it works for the greater good. Alas, there are too many who
use their faith for judging and condemming (Franklin Graham for
example).

Discussions on theology probably won't be resolved on RP's comment board. It's more for making fun of progressive rock. Embarrassed that I liked it as much and as long as I did.
One of the best albums ever made. An artistic feat of popular music rarely achieved.
Love this song, but it’s only one part of the real song which is the album the whole album is just a wonderful piece put together. Deck has always been a mystery to me, I never quite get where he gets his music from and I don’t think I want to know I just want to enjoy it. This album and ray Lamontagne‘s Ouroborous are cornerstones of that year for me. But both of these eclipsed by porcupine tree, and all thinks the radio paradise who turned me onto all of these.
 flyboy50 wrote:
The opening of this song is channeling John Lennon.
 
 
Yup. "Beautiful Boy".
Fantastic album, fantastic song. 
 Peter_K wrote:
Not sure why, but I detest this song (and others from this album)... Is it elevator music, completely dull without any edge or both?  Thankfully I can switch RP playlists..
 
I detest beck period
Not sure why, but I detest this song (and others from this album)... Is it elevator music, completely dull without any edge or both?  Thankfully I can switch RP playlists..
I've bought three Beck albums in the last year thanks to RP. Off now  to buy some London Grammar and Florence and the Machine next! 
Best station.
Better than the average Beck
 jelgator wrote:
This album is soooooooooo good.....
 
SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO good
This album is soooooooooo good.....
I love this song and was so disappointed when Beck did not perform it live when I saw him in December of last year :(
As someone who really doesn't like much of Beck's work, this one is... above acceptable.
Image result for mental prisoner looking out window
Beck's hood is not nearly as good as Jack White's Blunderbuss bonnet.
I really don't want to join the hater crew, but I always recoil at those toilet-seat-hat wearing styles.

I like Beck and this piece, so, no issues there. Just that dopey way of wearing a hat...
 flyboy50 wrote:
The opening of this song is channeling John Lennon.
 
I was thinking more of Brian Wilson. He does reach for those soaring Beach Boys / Beatles notes.
I just saw him at Red Rocks. So awesome. That was a bucket list wish come true.

And he played this song. 

L.RonDamnit!  (that's me taking the 'lord's' name in vain, for Beck's sake)

Beck has been working his way up my list of favorite artists.  Maybe it's his ability to sound different on each album.  Maybe it's the feeling he's incorporating his personal life into his compositions.  Maybe it's that I find nearly EVERY damn Beck track BillG plays highly enjoyable.  Yeah....probably that last one.  Long Live RP!!  And the opposite for L.Ron's "teachings." 

 rdo wrote:
Wagner's music is better than it sounds.

—Mark Twain
 
{#Lol} The odd thing is that I agree with both Twain and rdo, which whom I have little in common, on this. However, if rdo's artfully placed quote is meant to apply to Beck, I have to disagree (warned you about that commonality...). Beck is a stone genius, IMHO in a rank with Dylan, Strummer, Lennon, Prince, and (sigh) Jack White for his encyclopedic assimilation of rock'n'roll idioms. Guy's cool.
He performed this and Wave on SNL.  Wave mesmerized me.
{#Guitarist} great song ! great album mr Wilson could not have done it anybetter !
 crogers wrote:

Good to hear from you, Proc -

I suppose that one could use the term "bigoted" that broadly, but I think there's a not-so-subtle difference between fanatical atheists who feel more rational and learned than the believers around them (and need to tell them so) and rational, learned people rejecting religion and/or faith because they have no need of superstition for comfort or ancient writings for behavior guidance.  One becomes more rational and learned through education, experience and experimentation, coupled with a voracious appetite for substantiation of both facts and ideas and a mind open enough to avoid simply rejecting out of hand any reasonably plausible explanation of experiential phenomena.  

Maybe I do spend too much time examining it.  Of course, when discussing belief without plugging in the compassionate but slippery Perspective variable, it *is* all crazy.  I see superstition as the ugly child of fear and ignorance — and it's a needy, whiny, negative little bastard that, if allowed to grow unchecked in the human psyche, self-replicates and replaces positive things like confidence, self-determination, skepticism and even curiosity with more fear and ignorance.  The quality of ones judgement becomes tainted, decisions get made for the wrong reasons and people suffer.  Basing one's view of their place in the universe on a raft of superstitions looks to me like an unhealthy, self-defeating, dangerous way of going about things. For example, the Mayans had some interesting ideas.  For that matter, so do suicide bombers.

Fear and ignorance or confidence and knowledge?  Lazy slave to someone else's ancient ideas or a willingness to work hard to develop your own brutally honest understanding of what life really is?  Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...
 
Wow.  That is a lot of words.  It's dizzying how smart you are.  It's like looking at Einstein's Math equations on the chalk board.  How about this —> People need to feel connected to a higher power.  The question is the connection.  Lots of folks feel comfort in Jesus being their conduit or representative.  It is something everyone can understand from the young, old and even folks born with mental capacity problems can know Jesus and also Jesus knows them.  He is like a road out of the desert.... Why take that away from folks?  How about the assurance of a poor widow who longs to see her husband again, or a Mother who lost a child wanting reunion in Heaven.  Because you are smarter and think you know the answer?  Read the bible yourself, looks like you have an affinity for words.  The New Testament is probably shorter than the last book you read  Open your mind.  

P.S - I still think this sounds like a Brian Wilson tune....
 dkwalika wrote:
I should just by this album, I guess.

 
I did. Well worth it.
I should just by this album, I guess.
RP listeners frequently find ourselves stopped in our tracks. 😺💓💓💓
 crogers wrote:

Good to hear from you, Proc -

I suppose that one could use the term "bigoted" that broadly, but I think there's a not-so-subtle difference between fanatical atheists who feel more rational and learned than the believers around them (and need to tell them so) and rational, learned people rejecting religion and/or faith because they have no need of superstition for comfort or ancient writings for behavior guidance.  One becomes more rational and learned through education, experience and experimentation, coupled with a voracious appetite for substantiation of both facts and ideas and a mind open enough to avoid simply rejecting out of hand any reasonably plausible explanation of experiential phenomena.  

Maybe I do spend too much time examining it.  Of course, when discussing belief without plugging in the compassionate but slippery Perspective variable, it *is* all crazy.  I see superstition as the ugly child of fear and ignorance — and it's a needy, whiny, negative little bastard that, if allowed to grow unchecked in the human psyche, self-replicates and replaces positive things like confidence, self-determination, skepticism and even curiosity with more fear and ignorance.  The quality of ones judgement becomes tainted, decisions get made for the wrong reasons and people suffer.  Basing one's view of their place in the universe on a raft of superstitions looks to me like an unhealthy, self-defeating, dangerous way of going about things. For example, the Mayans had some interesting ideas.  For that matter, so do suicide bombers.

Fear and ignorance or confidence and knowledge?  Lazy slave to someone else's ancient ideas or a willingness to work hard to develop your own brutally honest understanding of what life really is?  Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...
 
There are those people who use their faith to inspire them to compassionate action.  Even as one might disagree with some parts of their faith (me & Billy Graham for example), it works for the greater good.  Alas, there are too many who use their faith for judging and condemming (Franklin Graham for example). 
 crogers wrote:
... Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...
 
  It's bigotry to believe one to be superior to others whose races or cultures are different; it has nothing to do with what one wishes for.  Perspective does change things — three- or four-point perspective enhances many pictures but generally requires a lot of erasing before the final drawing is done.    Still, I would not consider people like Rene Descartes, Isaac Newton, Mahatma Gandhi, or Martin Luther King to have been "ignorant" or "lazy slave(s) to someone else's ancient ideas" because they were religious.
{#Cheers}
I watched the Austin City Limits show with Beck, recorded in 2014.  The man still has it!
 
Relaxing in the middle of somewhere in Portugal loving rp. Thanks
 Hoosfoos wrote:White no talent meets black no talent.
Beck should respect artistry.



 

The opening of this song is channeling John Lennon.
 
The lush production may be overdone for some, but it just sweeps me away.  Most excellent!  I love this album!
Beck should respect artistry.


 stegokitty wrote:
My favourite album of 2014.
Every track is consistent with the thematic feeling, and well-done. 

 
{#Clap}
 Grammarcop wrote:
Spent time last summer with my wife's family. They had never heard of Beck.

Of course, they don't listen to any music that isn't about a tractor, a pickup or the United States of 'Merica.  

 
Which leaves them out of "The Perfect Country and Western Song"  No Mama, beer, or prison.
Now, whenever I listen to Beck I am thankful that I can hear what Kanye can't—
Even five until that choppy staccato guitar towards the end... now a solid 7 :D
{#Arrow} 7
 ircdn wrote:
All That Aside

Don't you just love that little clarinet sounding part at the end of the song that goes "Be-Be-Boop-Boop-Be-Boop-Be"? {#Cool}
 
 
Yup, got it... thanks.  Obviously a hot button for me.


All That Aside

Don't you just love that little clarinet sounding part at the end of the song that goes "Be-Be-Boop-Boop-Be-Boop-Be"? {#Cool}
 

    Proclivities wrote:
Good points, but "bigoted" is also an accurate way to describe someone who believes that their rejection of religion and/or faith automatically renders them more rational and learned than those who do not reject religion and/or faith.  I've met plenty of fanatical atheists who are just as dogmatic, obstinate, and evangelistic as "people of faith".  It may all seem crazy if one were to spend (too much) time examining it.
Good to hear from you, Proc -
I suppose that one could use the term "bigoted" that broadly, but I think there's a not-so-subtle difference between fanatical atheists who feel more rational and learned than the believers around them (and need to tell them so) and rational, learned people rejecting religion and/or faith because they have no need of superstition for comfort or ancient writings for behavior guidance.  One becomes more rational and learned through education, experience and experimentation, coupled with a voracious appetite for substantiation of both facts and ideas and a mind open enough to avoid simply rejecting out of hand any reasonably plausible explanation of experiential phenomena. 
Maybe I do spend too much time examining it.  Of course, when discussing belief without plugging in the compassionate but slippery Perspective variable, it *is* all crazy.  I see superstition as the ugly child of fear and ignorance — and it's a needy, whiny, negative little bastard that, if allowed to grow unchecked in the human psyche, self-replicates and replaces positive things like confidence, self-determination, skepticism and even curiosity with more fear and ignorance.  The quality of ones judgement becomes tainted, decisions get made for the wrong reasons and people suffer.  Basing one's view of their place in the universe on a raft of superstitions looks to me like an unhealthy, self-defeating, dangerous way of going about things. For example, the Mayans had some interesting ideas.  For that matter, so do suicide bombers.
Fear and ignorance or confidence and knowledge?  Lazy slave to someone else's ancient ideas or a willingness to work hard to develop your own brutally honest understanding of what life really is?  Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...
Kanye where are you?
 Proclivities wrote:

Good points, but "bigoted" is also an accurate way to describe someone who believes that their rejection of religion and/or faith automatically renders them more rational and learned than those who do not reject religion and/or faith.  I've met plenty of fanatical atheists who are just as dogmatic, obstinate, and evangelistic as "people of faith".  It may all seem crazy if one were to spend (too much) time examining it.

 
Good to hear from you, Proc -

I suppose that one could use the term "bigoted" that broadly, but I think there's a not-so-subtle difference between fanatical atheists who feel more rational and learned than the believers around them (and need to tell them so) and rational, learned people rejecting religion and/or faith because they have no need of superstition for comfort or ancient writings for behavior guidance.  One becomes more rational and learned through education, experience and experimentation, coupled with a voracious appetite for substantiation of both facts and ideas and a mind open enough to avoid simply rejecting out of hand any reasonably plausible explanation of experiential phenomena.  

Maybe I do spend too much time examining it.  Of course, when discussing belief without plugging in the compassionate but slippery Perspective variable, it *is* all crazy.  I see superstition as the ugly child of fear and ignorance — and it's a needy, whiny, negative little bastard that, if allowed to grow unchecked in the human psyche, self-replicates and replaces positive things like confidence, self-determination, skepticism and even curiosity with more fear and ignorance.  The quality of ones judgement becomes tainted, decisions get made for the wrong reasons and people suffer.  Basing one's view of their place in the universe on a raft of superstitions looks to me like an unhealthy, self-defeating, dangerous way of going about things. For example, the Mayans had some interesting ideas.  For that matter, so do suicide bombers.

Fear and ignorance or confidence and knowledge?  Lazy slave to someone else's ancient ideas or a willingness to work hard to develop your own brutally honest understanding of what life really is?  Is it bigotry to wish for a more rational, educated, compassionate, honest, open-minded, forward-looking human race?  Perhaps it is, depending on your Perspective...

 crogers wrote:

big·ot·ed   ˈbiɡədəd/   adjective
 
1. having or revealing an obstinate belief in the superiority of one's own opinions and a prejudiced intolerance of the opinions of others.

 
Huh, sounds like a good way to describe the teachings of most of the world's most popular religions, doesn't it?  Ya know, they don't call it dogma for nothing.  

When a rational, learned person, when confronted with all of that obstinance, prejudice and seemingly boundless hypocrisy, makes a considered, personal choice to simply not believe —  only to find themselves treated intolerantly by those espousing "freedom of religion", it should be no surprise that they see a little crazy leaking out from around all those glass houses.
 
Good points, but "bigoted" is also an accurate way to describe someone who believes that their rejection of religion and/or faith automatically renders them more rational and learned than those who do not reject religion and/or faith.  I've met plenty of fanatical atheists who are just as dogmatic, obstinate, and evangelistic as "people of faith".  It may all seem crazy if one were to spend (too much) time examining it.
 stegokitty wrote:


> What religion isn't crazy?
  
Bigoted much?
 
big·ot·ed   ˈbiɡədəd/   adjective
 
1. having or revealing an obstinate belief in the superiority of one's own opinions and a prejudiced intolerance of the opinions of others.

 
Huh, sounds like a good way to describe the teachings of most of the world's most popular religions, doesn't it?  Ya know, they don't call it dogma for nothing.  

When a rational, learned person, when confronted with all of that obstinance, prejudice and seemingly boundless hypocrisy, makes a considered, personal choice to simply not believe —  only to find themselves treated intolerantly by those espousing "freedom of religion", it should be no surprise that they see a little crazy leaking out from around all those glass houses.

 

 ick wrote:

What religion isn't crazy?

 
Bigoted much?
My favourite album of 2014.
Every track is consistent with the thematic feeling, and well-done. 
 Grammarcop wrote:
Spent time last summer with my wife's family. They had never heard of Beck.

Of course, they don't listen to any music that isn't about a tractor, a pickup or the United States of 'Merica.  

 
Now wait a minute, once you go tractor , you never go back
Spent time last summer with my wife's family. They had never heard of Beck.

Of course, they don't listen to any music that isn't about a tractor, a pickup or the United States of 'Merica.  
Good song, but I hear this enough on my way to work. Maybe we can vote to "hear it again in 3 years?"
A wonderful bookend to the excellent Sea Change.

I do like it when Beck decides to write actual songs. 
Love this album.
Great, great album.  Thanks RP!
 moodfood wrote:
okay but why so much FM radio like airplay?

 
Chill please...
 Relayer wrote:
Solid album here.  Almost good enough for me to overlook his crazy Scientology ideas.

 
What religion isn't crazy?
 jagdriver wrote:
A very consistent album from start to finish, like a suite. I really enjoy it while making/eating breakfast.

Right now PBS has another Austin City Limits performance of his (theirs) you can stream for free. 

 
Free?   They would have to pay ME to watch that boring no-talent.
A very consistent album from start to finish, like a suite. I really enjoy it while making/eating breakfast.

Right now PBS has another Austin City Limits performance of his (theirs) you can stream for free. 
This is just boring.
Not growing on me. I'm unpleasantly disappointed :-(
This music always takes me away to a place I wanna be.....{#Yes}
I'm liking this new work from Beck. Some of those early albums seemed like random cacophonies.
okay but why so much FM radio like airplay?
 On_The_Beach wrote:
BEWARE PROCTOLOGIST!!!
Or is it sociologist, I can't remember?

 
Herpetologist, mycologist, ophthalmologist?
I love this song
If you didn't see it, Beck was on The Colbert Report on 28 July 14.  Wondering about the mood of the album, Colbert asked, "Why Beck sad?"

Caught Beck live at an outdoor amphitheater last weekend, complete with full moon, and the show was just fabulous.  The man is such an amazing artist.  His bandmates were pretty spectacular too:)   If you get a chance to see him, you won't be disappointed.


 Relayer wrote:
Solid album here.  Almost good enough for me to overlook his crazy Scientology ideas.

 

From what I've read, he doen't have any crazy Scientology ideas. His parents were Scientologists and that's what he grew up with, but it sounded to me like he doesn't really think about it much, but then again i read that a long time ago.

BTW what crazy religious ideas do you ascribed to? 
Solid album here.  Almost good enough for me to overlook his crazy Scientology ideas.
Loved the unique Saturday Night Live performances.  Beck is certainly marching to his own drummer, props for that.
I say let's rev Beck up to 45!
Such an excellent album!
 Mr_Fix_it wrote:
The more I hear this song, the more I have come to liking it.

 
Agreed, Sounds from this album are growing on me.
Nice -- very nice.
zip.....
 rdo wrote:
I do not get why he "sings"??  He ought to just hire a real singer.  That voice is cringeworthy.  I can't stand it.  Bleck.
 
...but it's the perfect voice for these weak "songs" he keeps pumping out.
Wagner's music is better than it sounds.

--Mark Twain
Great CD!
 zepher wrote:

I agree, it's like Beck meets Brian Wilson.... Excellent track.



 
Wow, and I thought I was so cool for hearing the Beach Boys in this song. Then I opened this song comment page and find I have to get in line behind a rare picture of Brian Wilson looking relatively thin and healthy. The pants...well, not even the goat's too sure about those. 

I previewed this album on Amazon and a lot of the song sounded great but a bit similar. May have to listen again and even buy the sucker. I give this a 7 or 8.  
very good new album
I love it.  It's Beck grown-up, and it's better/different/just-as-good.  Can't decide, no need to.  Sort of like me, I'd like to think.  Anyway, I keep listening. Bought the album. 
 motobecane wrote:

Maybe he just likes to sing?
 
I cannot understand with all the people who complain ENDLESSLY about OTHER singers here WHO SING JUST FINE OR EVEN GREAT, NO ONE complains about the one guy who cannot sing at all.
 Garyohh wrote:
Really enjoying this album....  Beach Boys meet Ryan Adams. Am I crazy?
 
I agree, it's like Beck meets Brian Wilson.... Excellent track.


Really enjoying this album....  Beach Boys meet Ryan Adams. Am I crazy?
 jkamm14 wrote:

If it's true that this new album is essentially Sea Change Part 2, I'm all in. That's a fantastic collection.



 
agreed.  I am glad has returned to this creative space.
The more I hear this song, the more I have come to liking it.
 rdo wrote:
I do not get why he "sings"??  He ought to just hire a real singer.  That voice is cringeworthy.  I can't stand it.  Bleck.
 
Maybe he just likes to sing?
BEWARE PROCTOLOGIST!!!
Or is it sociologist, I can't remember?
the whole album is good, from what i have heard
 Larrygrrl wrote:
Heard an interview with Beck this morning on NPR.  I love the concept of this album.

 
I heard the interview as well....props to Beck AND NPR!
Heard an interview with Beck this morning on NPR.  I love the concept of this album.
Worth the wait.
I liked this enough to pre-order. Hope the rest is comparable.
 
Really nice.  Might be the first Beck album in my collection.

If it's true that this new album is essentially Sea Change Part 2, I'm all in. That's a fantastic collection.


 This is the first thing from Beck that I've ever liked. And I really, really like it.
I do not get why he "sings"??  He ought to just hire a real singer.  That voice is cringeworthy.  I can't stand it.  Bleck.
{#Yell} ...... go Beck go - really enjoying the new album :))
 Elroweho wrote:
So far so good from the preliminary tastes I've heard from this album. Can we please just enjoy this new music from Beck rather than rant about his Scientology connection? We are hear at RP for the music right? 

 
Stingray seems to have abandoned us so we're probably safe for now.
"Loser" sounds like something a 23 year old might make.  This sounds like something a 43 year old would make.  I'm digging it.  
 
I like the song, the album cover, not so much.
love it.
Indeed.
Nothing left to prove, just high quality, well executed music.

 
miahfost wrote:
Fascinating to watch the transition from "Mellow Gold" to this.

 


 Elroweho wrote:
So far so good from the preliminary tastes I've heard from this album. Can we please just enjoy this new music from Beck rather than rant about his Scientology connection? We are hear at RP for the music right? 

 
I here you.
Fascinating to watch the transition from "Mellow Gold" to this.
New Beck!
It's just okay, not great. I will have to give the whole album a listen.
So far so good from the preliminary tastes I've heard from this album. Can we please just enjoy this new music from Beck rather than rant about his Scientology connection? We are hear at RP for the music right? 
I feel maybe Beck lost his "spark" but it's fine music.