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Yes — South Side of the Sky
Album: Fragile
Avg rating:
6.7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 256









Released: 1971
Length: 7:40
Plays (last 30 days): 0
A river a mountain to be crossed
the sunshine in mountains sometimes lost
around the south side so cold that we cried
were we ever colder on that day a million miles away
it seemed from all of eternity

Move forward was my friends only cry
in deeper to somewhere we could lie
and rest for the day with cold in the way
were we ever colder on that day a million miles away
it seemed from all of eternity

The moments seemed lost in all the noise
a snow storm a stimulating voice
of warmth of the sky of warmth when you die
were we ever warmer on that day a million miles away
we seemed for all of eternity

The sunshine in mountains sometimes lost
the river can disregard the cost
and melt in the sky warmth when you die
were we ever warmer on that day a million miles away
we seemed from all of eternity
Comments (65)add comment
Always was a '10' in my book.  (:
YESSSSSSSS!   Music for the intellectual musicians and artists of the time....MY time! {#Daisy}
 ScottFromWyoming wrote:

Then what good is it? None, I say. NONE Good!

 
Well I never have trouble partying to it. {#Cool}
 LowPhreak wrote:

I don't think Prog was intended to be party music for pubs and clubs, Willie.

 
Then what good is it? None, I say. NONE Good!
 coloradojohn wrote:
I was DJing an OUTRAGEOUS party in '81 or '82 with my GDI mates at the Tech-Engine Club at UMR in Rolla, MO... When I played this it brought the crowd to rocking out into the street, which brought new mates inside, cheering, which made me crank it even louder!

 
You cannot even get this tune too loud!  {#Clap}
I was DJing an OUTRAGEOUS party in '81 or '82 with my GDI mates at the Tech-Engine Club at UMR in Rolla, MO... When I played this it brought the crowd to rocking out into the street, which brought new mates inside, cheering, which made me crank it even louder!
 ScottishWillie wrote:

I beg to differ on that one. I still see the influences of punk in many of todays Indie/Rock bands. Arguably its long term influence is more important than the 2-3 years it was top of the musical heap.

It was also a shit load more fun in the pubs, clubs and streets of the UK than Prog ever was.

 
I don't think Prog was intended to be party music for pubs and clubs, Willie.
 Peace_tode wrote:

Very good deep cut! Love it.



 

I was 4 or 5 when this came out. But when I got into some FM stations when I was 12-13, I got to hear this great stuff.

This was not a "deep cut" back then. It was played a lot on the radio.

Tremendous talent in this band.

 ScottishWillie wrote:
I beg to differ on that one. I still see the influences of punk in many of todays Indie/Rock bands. Arguably its long term influence is more important than the 2-3 years it was top of the musical heap.
It was also a shit load more fun in the pubs, clubs and streets of the UK than Prog ever was.
 
Mostly I was just being a smartass.
I can definitely see the appeal and influence of Punk; it just didn't do much for me personally.
 Steely_D wrote:

Punk: you don't need talent. You just need to be loud and angry.

And people bought into that? Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.
It was/is a merchandising gimmick that included more people than prog - so the record companies could make more money. 

 
You probably know that your first sentence is more or less what people who liked music from the 1940s said about the rock'n'roll of the 1950s and '60s.  Most of the fans of punk rock didn't "buy into" it, they preferred it to the bloated, soulless arena rock and disco of the early 1970s.  There was no "boss"; if anything, the "boss" was the sterile, more-of-the-same establishment which controlled all the record labels and radio stations, and was trying to pretend it was still the '60s.  True, it was eventually turned into merchandising by record labels (like everything else - it's their job), but that had nothing to do with the bands playing CBGB and Max's Kansas City, or London clubs in the early '70s.
There is no truly scientific formula for matters of taste; it's what one personally relates to.  It's like comparing contemporaries such as Renoir and Van Gogh: the former's work was painterly and pleasant, with analogous color schemes, while the latter's painting style was often fervent and emotional, with no intention of hiding brush strokes and often executed in garish, bold color schemes.  Who was the "better" artist?  Whose work is ultimately "more important"?  It's still a matter of personal aesthetics. While I like several recording artists who are now referred to as "progressive rock" (a woefully vague term), this sort of "hobbit rock" did nothing for me.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Oh look, I've got a Mohawk and a safety pin in my cheek, and I couldn't play a guitar to save my life, and oh yeah, I spit on the audience.
Gee, I wonder why it didn't last?
(Iggy/Stooges did it better years earlier.)

 
I beg to differ on that one. I still see the influences of punk in many of todays Indie/Rock bands. Arguably its long term influence is more important than the 2-3 years it was top of the musical heap.

It was also a shit load more fun in the pubs, clubs and streets of the UK than Prog ever was.
From the days when I was a fledgling hippy complete with loons and cheesecloth shirts. Marvellous.  
Saw them in 1971. Three band event. They warmed up for Alice Cooper who then warmed up for Black Sabbath. Left after Black Sabbath's fourth song. Hard acts to follow.
Reminds me of the good old days.
Is this dated, yes Yes is dated but still very much a guilty pleasure.  A 9 on the rate scale.
Good music to do calisthenics to. Otherwise sucks.
 Steely_D wrote:
Punk: you don't need talent. You just need to be loud and angry.
And people bought into that? (edit)
 
Oh look, I've got a Mohawk and a safety pin in my cheek, and I couldn't play a guitar to save my life, and oh yeah, I spit on the audience.
Gee, I wonder why it didn't last?
(Iggy/Stooges did it better years earlier.)
 fredriley wrote:
If the answer's Yes, you're asking the wrong question. The epitome of pretentious, baroque, and overblown 70s prog rock, and I write that as a one-time fan of ELP, who took some beating on pretentiousness and pompousness. I tried to get into Yes at the time because that's what all my pseudo-intellectual teen mates were into (or pretended they were), but I just couldn't fathom the gnomic lyrics which promised much in terms of portentiousness and mystical wossnames, but ultimately meant feck-all. Squared. To top it off, yer tyke wi' t' Yorkshire accent, 'appen, and who had a voice like a laryngitic crow, was seriously irritating. The best thing that happened to Yes, ELP, Amon Duul and the rest, was punk, which blew them away into the dustbin of musical history, where they should remain, ideally with the lid locked down under a half-ton of bricks.

Other than that, I didn't mind them...

 
Well, not quite, Fred. As I recall it, punk really started to take off in the U.S. about what, 1976 or so? Perhaps a bit earlier in the UK. Certainly toward the end of 1977 (and I was 16 that year) when Never Mind The Bollocks came out. At any rate, punk was just the new flash-in-the-pan fad, while Yes released several excellent albums during and after that which sold tons of copies.

They weren't the band that they had been in the early-mid 70's, but neither were they "blown away into the dustbin of musical history" by punk. Meanwhile, punk faded out fairly quickly after it became more about fashion than angst & anti-establishment.
 fredriley wrote:
If the answer's Yes, you're asking the wrong question. The epitome of pretentious, baroque, and overblown 70s prog rock, and I write that as a one-time fan of ELP, who took some beating on pretentiousness and pompousness. I tried to get into Yes at the time because that's what all my pseudo-intellectual teen mates were into (or pretended they were), but I just couldn't fathom the gnomic lyrics which promised much in terms of portentiousness and mystical wossnames, but ultimately meant feck-all. Squared. To top it off, yer tyke wi' t' Yorkshire accent, 'appen, and who had a voice like a laryngitic crow, was seriously irritating. The best thing that happened to Yes, ELP, Amon Duul and the rest, was punk, which blew them away into the dustbin of musical history, where they should remain, ideally with the lid locked down under a half-ton of bricks.

Other than that, I didn't mind them...

 
Punk: you don't need talent. You just need to be loud and angry.

And people bought into that? Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.
It was/is a merchandising gimmick that included more people than prog - so the record companies could make more money. 
Me, I liked a lot this trippy stuff.
Doing all of those mind bending things went very well with it.

Along with that they were very talented folks.
Lyrics were however, were often secondary.
 Lazarus wrote:
Everybody in my alien space craft loves this song...

Holy prog-rock afternoon Batman! Supper's Ready by Genesis earlier followed by Yes-South Side of the Sky. Hope you are having a marvelous time Laz {#Drummer}

 

 

Yes, let's fly!
I agree, truly a great piece of music.
Everybody in my alien space craft loves this song...


 
 fredriley wrote:
If the answer's Yes, you're asking the wrong question. The epitome of pretentious, baroque, and overblown 70s prog rock, and I write that as a one-time fan of ELP, who took some beating on pretentiousness and pompousness. I tried to get into Yes at the time because that's what all my pseudo-intellectual teen mates were into (or pretended they were), but I just couldn't fathom the gnomic lyrics which promised much in terms of portentiousness and mystical wossnames, but ultimately meant feck-all. Squared. To top it off, yer tyke wi' t' Yorkshire accent, 'appen, and who had a voice like a laryngitic crow, was seriously irritating. The best thing that happened to Yes, ELP, Amon Duul and the rest, was punk, which blew them away into the dustbin of musical history, where they should remain, ideally with the lid locked down under a half-ton of bricks.

Other than that, I didn't mind them...

 
I'm with you Fred.  And I never succumbed to whole prog movement, kind of went straight from Beatles, Stones and Bowie to punk.
Top view of the Harry Manx flying machine on the previous song - -second time I've seen this visual segway theme today.  Nicely done Bill.  Was it intentional?
 fredriley wrote:
If the answer's Yes, you're asking the wrong question. The epitome of pretentious, baroque, and overblown 70s prog rock, and I write that as a one-time fan of ELP, who took some beating on pretentiousness and pompousness. I tried to get into Yes at the time because that's what all my pseudo-intellectual teen mates were into (or pretended they were), but I just couldn't fathom the gnomic lyrics which promised much in terms of portentiousness and mystical wossnames, but ultimately meant feck-all. Squared. To top it off, yer tyke wi' t' Yorkshire accent, 'appen, and who had a voice like a laryngitic crow, was seriously irritating. The best thing that happened to Yes, ELP, Amon Duul and the rest, was punk, which blew them away into the dustbin of musical history, where they should remain, ideally with the lid locked down under a half-ton of bricks.

Other than that, I didn't mind them...

 
Please Fred don't hold back your feelings.....

Brings back a lot of memories which is good for the occasional spin. 
The whole album is a blast! {#Music}
enjoying - reminds me of Jane's Addiction too - who I LIKE!
 casey1024 wrote:
This song happily sends me back to summer daze spent with the best of friends.  Emphasis on the daze.  Sweet.

 
{#Cowboy}
OK, the piano break and the la las...may not be for everyone, but the rest of this classic is a straight ahead rocker.  Love the groove between the guitar and bass.
This song happily sends me back to summer daze spent with the best of friends.  Emphasis on the daze.  Sweet.


 aspicer wrote:
Mind boggling to me this is rated only a 6.7?!?! {#Ask}

 

Yea, boggles my mind too.
 mgtom wrote:
Had to stop what I was doing to crank volume, then rate. Yes + college + beer + girls = great memories.

 
Another fellow N-East Ohioan!  Always wondered if anyone listened to RP around here.
 ziggytrix wrote:

You got your prog on my rock!

 
You got your rock in my prog!  Mmmmmm.
 fredriley wrote:
If the answer's Yes, you're asking the wrong question. The epitome of pretentious, baroque, and overblown 70s prog rock, and I write that as a one-time fan of ELP, who took some beating on pretentiousness and pompousness. I tried to get into Yes at the time because that's what all my pseudo-intellectual teen mates were into (or pretended they were), but I just couldn't fathom the gnomic lyrics which promised much in terms of portentiousness and mystical wossnames, but ultimately meant feck-all. Squared. To top it off, yer tyke wi' t' Yorkshire accent, 'appen, and who had a voice like a laryngitic crow, was seriously irritating. The best thing that happened to Yes, ELP, Amon Duul and the rest, was punk, which blew them away into the dustbin of musical history, where they should remain, ideally with the lid locked down under a half-ton of bricks.

Other than that, I didn't mind them...
 
You are not alone in your assessment, but I disagree...  this is great stoner music...  I still have the original vinyl, and the grooves are worn out from when friends and I listened to it all those years ago as we shared doobies and sang along...  the virtuoso music and harmonies make up for any spaced-out lyrics...

 
 aspicer wrote:
Mind boggling to me this is rated only a 6.7?!?! {#Ask}

 
Truly.
Mind boggling to me this is rated only a 6.7?!?! {#Ask}
yes yes yes {#Dance}
Sorry, really not my thing. 2. Endless self indulgent noodling. 
If the answer's Yes, you're asking the wrong question. The epitome of pretentious, baroque, and overblown 70s prog rock, and I write that as a one-time fan of ELP, who took some beating on pretentiousness and pompousness. I tried to get into Yes at the time because that's what all my pseudo-intellectual teen mates were into (or pretended they were), but I just couldn't fathom the gnomic lyrics which promised much in terms of portentiousness and mystical wossnames, but ultimately meant feck-all. Squared. To top it off, yer tyke wi' t' Yorkshire accent, 'appen, and who had a voice like a laryngitic crow, was seriously irritating. The best thing that happened to Yes, ELP, Amon Duul and the rest, was punk, which blew them away into the dustbin of musical history, where they should remain, ideally with the lid locked down under a half-ton of bricks.

Other than that, I didn't mind them...
Had this in vinyl and cassette format.  All gone.

Good to see it was not just me and a tiny handful of buddies growing up that adored this band.

The CD Relayer is my favourite. 
This used to get the house rocking back in the day!  Before the windowpane kicked in, you had to be sure a stack of this was on the rack.
 strous wrote:
Where is the good old time of Yes, Gentle Giant, etc.

 
Alive and well in my vinyl collection. {#Biggrin}
If you like Yes, you like Bill Bruford.

If you like Bill Bruford, you like this song. 
Usually I like hearing Yes.  But this song, not so much.
 Peace_tode wrote:

Very good deep cut! Love it.



 
Me too.
Where is the good old time of Yes, Gentle Giant, etc.

Very good deep cut! Love it.


NO
{#Heartkiss}  Amazing British band - stunning live, saw them in 1968 at the marquee in London.

Quintessential Yes  A great album..  On to the Heart of the Sunrise


 moodfood wrote:
they were prog rock before the genre was defined, them and king crimson.

 
You got your prog on my rock!
Yeah, the blissful touch of progressive...
...quite like the fact that RP is digging out some of these classics. Thoroughly enjoyable...
Had to stop what I was doing to crank volume, then rate. Yes + college + beer + girls = great memories.
Love it !!    This was THE year and album for YES... brings back many good memories.....
Wonderful, brilliant song.
they were prog rock before the genre was defined, them and king crimson.
Wow what happened that now Bill has found all these classics never before played on RP?!  I believe this is the 3rd I've heard in a week or so. Brilliant and masterful tune. 
Noisy Yes - Yes!!
 d48m02h wrote:
Wow - didn't expect to hear this cut from this album!!

Plus, be the first to comment!! 

 
Gotcha :)
{#Good-vibes}  The epitome of Yes awesomeness. "10".
Wow - didn't expect to hear this cut from this album!! {#Cheers}
A most welcome addition to the playlist! Volume up!