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Cream — Deserted Cities of the Heart
Album: Wheels of Fire
Avg rating:
7.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1161









Released: 1968
Length: 3:36
Plays (last 30 days): 3
Upon this street where time has died.
The golden treat you never tried.
In times of old, in days gone by.
If I could catch your dancing eye.

It was on the way,
On the road to dreams, yeah.
Now my heart's drowned in no love streams, yeah.

The street is cold, its trees are gone.
The story's told the dark has won.
Once we set sail to catch a star.
We had to fail, it was too far.

It was on the way,
On the road to dreams, yeah.
Now my heart's drowned in no love streams, yeah.

I felt the wind shout like a drum.
You said, "My friend, love's end has come."
It couldn't last, had to stop.
You drained it all to the last drop.

It was on the way,
On the road to dreams, yeah.
Now my heart's drowned in no love streams, yeah.

Now my heart's drowned in no love streams, yeah.

On this dark street the sun is black.
The winter life is coming back.
On this dark street it's cold inside.
There's no retreat from time that's died.

It was on the way,
On the road to dreams.
Now my heart's drowned in no love streams, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.
Now my heart's drowned in no love streams, yeah.
Now my heart's drowned in no love.
Comments (64)add comment
Around 9 years old, went upstairs at a friend's house in City Island, NY one summer: on the coffee table lay three albums: Wheels of Fire, Electric Ladyland, and Cheap Thrills. A guitar case lay open near by with his big brother's white Stratocaster in it. Talk about a moment that defined a big part of the rest of my life....
 stevesaw wrote:
Just waiting for my wife to poke her head in "Can you turn it down a bit?"


no. not yet.
 
(My wife knows better...)
Insanely great stuff, a reminder of how deep Cream were after their well-known hits, which are overplayed. 
Just waiting for my wife to poke her head in "Can you turn it down a bit?"


no. not yet.
 rushed wrote:
When Ginger isn't make tacos....
 

 jvalatka wrote:
RIP Ginger Baker
 
And Jack Bruce — whose voice is unmistakable on this track.
When Ginger isn't make tacos....
 westslope wrote:
Of all the 'heavy rock' from the period, why do I like this so much, yet I feel indifferent towards Led Zepplin, most of Deep Purple, Black Sabbath?   

I am on the coach.  
 To me there was insight in what they did.    I did not have the impression they were concerned about mugging me for my money through faux empathy with my pathetic attempts with girls.  They seemed to be playing and developing in the way they wanted to.  Deserted Cities is a good example but there are plenty more: Tales of Brave Ulysses, Strange Brew, Politician, What a Bringdown, Badge and many more. Gorgeous stuff.  When the likes of Zepplin et al sing of love it might sound OK but it nearly always tends to adolescent mysogyny.  There is rarely any insight.  It's a stretch but I think you can say the same for the melodies as well as the lyrics for the majority of the bands Cream influenced. That is just about everything that came after them. 

Wow! Thanks Bill! 
Gorgeous. What a double album.  The writing credit for this one is Bruce and Brown but I expect Bruce was being generous with Brown. who's lyrics are normally cobblers, and tight with Baker who is credited not at all for what is a superb arrangement.  It was a 9 for me but it's upped to a 10.  Hiatt followed by Cream at their best.  Only on RP.
Wow
Just who is that guy plucking on a string?

OUTSTANDING
Tight!
Thanks RP, almost forgot how good this gem is....
Great song!
Great song. One of the best rock song titles.
I can't help it.  Gimme a 9.  That is just too banging hot for an 8. 
Hey B&R, I just love the creativity of your playlists! 

Cream following Kula Shaker, Tattva makes me hungry for tacos:)
 thewiseking wrote:
Felix Pappalardi was the genius behind this and the creation of what we now refer to as METAL
 
I will agree.  While he produced Disraeli Gears, and co-wrote a couple of the songs, Mr Pappalardi was an excellent bassist himself.  (See Mountain.) 

Not sure he's the creator of 'metal', but will agree enthusiastically that he was a YUGE influence in the development of heavy arena-based rock.
20 minutes too short
RIP Ginger Baker
 stevesaw wrote:
I think Cream was a bit more experimental.
 
I've heard this song a bazllion times, yet I always stop, turn up the volume, and relish it each time.
 
Anyone know how Clapton gets that particular sound during the solo?
 
 
 



 
Sounds like it could be a Telecaster.
Felix Pappalardi was the genius behind this and the creation of what we now refer to as METAL
Rating 7 down to   6 for me
Ahhhhh, nice to hear Cream that isn't White Room or Sunshine.... well-played, Bill!
I think Cream was a bit more experimental.
 
I've heard this song a bazllion times, yet I always stop, turn up the volume, and relish it each time.
 
Anyone know how Clapton gets that particular sound during the solo?
 
 
 

 westslope wrote:
Of all the 'heavy rock' from the period, why do I like this so much, yet I feel indifferent towards Led Zepplin, most of Deep Purple, Black Sabbath?   

I am on the coach.  

 

Crank it up!
 kcar wrote:

Two listings of personnel and instruments lean towards Proclivities' opinion. It sounds like a xylophone or glockenspiel being muted slightly so you don't hear a lot of ringing—but there's no mention of either instrument in the listings for this track. Pappalardi does play a viola here, and it's definitely possible that he plucked only a short section of strings to get that muted, metallic sound.

But it's weird, though: the band used a glockenspiel on the song "Passing The Time", so why not use it here instead of doing some weird shit with a viola?  Was it just a matter of the drugs making the decisions?

 
kcar, Proclivities:  Love discussions like this.  10^3 thanks.  
Of all the 'heavy rock' from the period, why do I like this so much, yet I feel indifferent towards Led Zepplin, most of Deep Purple, Black Sabbath?   

I am on the coach.  
 Queue wrote:

I think it is a Xylophone.  {#Smile}

 

 Proclivities wrote:

That's a stringed instrument being plucked (pizzicato), not a percussion instrument.  It's probably the viola that Pappalardi is credited for.

 
Two listings of personnel and instruments lean towards Proclivities' opinion. It sounds like a xylophone or glockenspiel being muted slightly so you don't hear a lot of ringing—but there's no mention of either instrument in the listings for this track. Pappalardi does play a viola here, and it's definitely possible that he plucked only a short section of strings to get that muted, metallic sound.

But it's weird, though: the band used a glockenspiel on the song "Passing The Time", so why not use it here instead of doing some weird shit with a viola?  Was it just a matter of the drugs making the decisions?
One word describes these guys:   AWESOME!
 kcar wrote:

Definitely, but your counts of musicians and instruments is off. The list below doesn't include something like a glockenspiel, which Ginger starts playing around 1:51. Overall, an incredible sound. Ginger's drumming here is not like anything else I've heard in rock. 

"Deserted Cities of the Heart"

Eric Clapton – guitars Gibson Reverse Firebird & Gibson SG standard ("Fool") backing track and lead guitar

Jack Bruce – bass, vocals, cello, acoustic guitar

Ginger Baker – drums, tambourine

Felix Pappalardi – viola 

 
That's a stringed instrument being plucked (pizzicato), not a percussion instrument.  It's probably the viola that Pappalardi is credited for.
 kcar wrote:

Definitely, but your counts of musicians and instruments is off. The list below doesn't include something like a glockenspiel, which Ginger starts playing around 1:51.

 
I think it is a Xylophone.  {#Smile}
 kingart wrote:
S-M-O-K-I-N-G hot. Never to be a band sound like that again. Three men, four instruments, a solid wall of music. 

 
Definitely, but your counts of musicians and instruments is off. The list below doesn't include something like a glockenspiel, which Ginger starts playing around 1:51. Overall, an incredible sound. Ginger's drumming here is not like anything else I've heard in rock. 

"Deserted Cities of the Heart"

Eric Clapton – guitars Gibson Reverse Firebird & Gibson SG standard ("Fool") backing track and lead guitar

Jack Bruce – bass, vocals, cello, acoustic guitar

Ginger Baker – drums, tambourine

Felix Pappalardi – viola 
S-M-O-K-I-N-G hot. Never to be a band sound like that again. Three men, four instruments, a solid wall of music. 
Love everything about this song, this album, this band.
 {#Yes}Bert7 wrote:
Revolutionary band...

 


S O L I D
 Skydog wrote:
after I have said that I liked Cream people say, oh an Eric Clapton fan, and I respond, no I'm a Jack Bruce fan
.
(never tell your mother she's out of tune)

 
Have you listened to this?: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_Rails
 
Revolutionary band...
The third Cream song that Bill has played today. Thank you Bill!
Very Contemporary Art
after I have said that I liked Cream people say, oh an Eric Clapton fan, and I respond,  well yes but I'm a big  Jack Bruce fan
.
(never tell your mother she's out of tune)
What an amazing time it was back in the day to be a teen having this roaring from the stereo. Wow.
 coloradojohn wrote:
One of the greatest bassists of the time! and sizzling guitar n drums in there, too... Lots of similarities with Jefferson Airplane, as well...

 
For years I only knew the "Live Cream vol. II" version, but this studio recording is far better. The drumming and guitar are crazy...
Jack Bruce could write a song
Fabulous! Rockin' in the kitchen~
 idiot_wind wrote:
Geez...whoever this band is, they sure could use a decent guitar player and a drummer.

And the album cover is in black and white. Pretty old fashioned.   

 
Actually it was black and a shiny silver on the regular album cover but it doesn't show up in the picture here.
Good old cream......cooking on gas {#Chef}
Geez...whoever this band is, they sure could use a decent guitar player and a drummer.

And the album cover is in black and white. Pretty old fashioned.   
 Haddonfield NJ Music tent ~ about the same time. Then about a year later the 'New Cream' (Blind Faith) at the Spectrum in Philly.

Those were the days.....

martinc wrote:
Capital Theatre on Bank Street - 1968 I think it was. 

 


Rock in Peace (RIP), Jack. Your minor-key singing was unique.
Funny how this sounds a bit like Bowie in the The Man Who Sold The World days...
One of the greatest bassists of the time! and sizzling guitar n drums in there, too... Lots of similarities with Jefferson Airplane, as well...
 mgkiwi wrote:
FUCK, this takes me back!!! {#Good-vibes}

 
FUCK!!! FUUUUUUCK MAN, WOOO-HOOO!!! That piece is wicked  ; )
Capital Theatre on Bank Street - 1968 I think it was. 
RIP Jack Bruce 25 October 2014 ...
... love the past
 black321 wrote:
Never got into Cream; too bombastic.

 

I feel that way about some of their songs too - but this is scorchin'. First time I've heard it.
Real class, real class.
Grow up!

mgkiwi wrote:
FUCK, this takes me back!!! {#Good-vibes}

 


Never got into Cream; too bombastic.
FUCK, this takes me back!!! {#Good-vibes}
A great tune from what most rock 'n' roll aficionados consider the "cream of the crop" of drummer, bassist, and guitarist at that time-Baker, Bruce, and Clapton. Those who don't rate this at least a 6 out of respect don't know much about what made rock 'n' roll what it is today. Factoid: They originally thought of calling themselves: Sweet 'n' Sour Rock 'n' Roll!
awesome    oh god those drums!!!                 love it, cool cover-art even
Good Song!