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Sinéad O'Connor — 'Til I Whisper You Something
Album: Faith & Courage
Avg rating:
6.8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 693









Released: 2000
Length: 5:58
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Sure hate to see u looking so sad
Delicate man it needn't be that bad
U sit with me and I will listen
You'll feel much better when u open
U said all u wanted was a good time
It's a big hill u have to climb
And u got to be willing

U stand tall and u be strong
U have ruthless compassion
For yourself and for everyone
Yeah it's hard but it can be done

I know you've every right to feel grief
You've not had anything that u need
But u put your head on my shoulder
'Til I whisper u something
'Til I whisper u something

It don't take much to have a good time
A lot of lovemaking and a little wind
And u got to be willing

U stand tall and u stand strong
U try ruthless compassion
For yourself and for everyone
Yeah it's hard but it can be done

U put your head on my shoulder
'Til I whisper u something
'Til I whisper u something

It's a long walk towards a good time
Like a big hill u have to climb
And u got to be willing

It don't take much to have a good time
A lot of lovemaking and a little wind
And u got to be willing

If you've never seen a good time
If you've never seen a good time
If you've never seen a good time
How would u recognise one
How would u recognise one
How would u even find one
How would u, if you've never seen a good time
If you've never seen a good time
If you've never seen a good time
How would u recognise one
Comments (41)add comment
Mesmerizing.
"It don't take much to have a good time" feeling that one...
 Webfoot wrote:

Yes!  Even reporters on the news (NPR). It drives me nuts.
 
I don't hear too many glottal stops from NPR reporters, at least not American ones.  I do hear a lot of "vocal fry" and far, far too much starting sentences with the word "so".
 Hannio wrote:

I'm hearing it more and more among young females here in the US.  Not so much among males, though, oddly.



 
Yes!  Even reporters on the news (NPR). It drives me nuts.
 zenben wrote:
aw, its Sinead the one everyone loves to hate...but this woman has some very serious talent. Might be crazy as a bed bug...meet many musicians or performers that weren't? I like it, she always finds a way to put something out there that is heartfelt and quality. In any case, i like listening to her and appreciate this, Bill!

 
Crazy? really? She has serious and life-threatening mental health issues with apparently very little support. 
Gotta say, the lilting melody and shifting rhythms are quite pleasing, and the tones she gets out of her voice are really tasty! I like this...
Ha.  "A lot of lovemaking and a little wind".  More the other way round for me, these days.
aw, its Sinead the one everyone loves to hate...but this woman has some very serious talent. Might be crazy as a bed bug...meet many musicians or performers that weren't? I like it, she always finds a way to put something out there that is heartfelt and quality. In any case, i like listening to her and appreciate this, Bill!
 phlattop wrote:
I like her but jeez, this is bad.

 
I don't like her but I love this! Each to his own eh?
and another brilliant number by Sinead........always makes me stop what I am doing and pay attention
TerryS wrote:
Like the song, but could live without the glottal stops.

 
Pretty sure it's a deliberate affectation employed specifically for this song, also pretty sure Sinead doesn't care if anyone likes it.


        U stand for still
  'Til I whisper u something
I like her but jeez, this is bad.
 fredriley wrote:


The glottal stop is quite common in English regional dialects, particularly in London and the SE.For instance, in Luton - sorry, loo'n - a hard 't' is as rare as rocking horse sh1t. It's a bit surprising to hear an Irishwoman using a glottal stop, though. Nice uillean pipes in the background.

 

I'm hearing it more and more among young females here in the US.  Not so much among males, though, oddly.


Some useless disharmony and unsyncopated flute. The flute could have been playing to a completely different tune.
 TerryS wrote:
Like the song, but could live without the glottal stops.

 
Absolutely.  Horrible sound.

ps I don't think I'd be giving Sinead a call if it was a good time I was after.
 ziggytrix wrote:
at first i thought that album name said faith and begorrah (on the little cover art - tho it's quite clear in the text below it)

 
"Oh, faith and begorrah, Batman!"
o'hara 

Good tune.
Like the song, but could live without the glottal stops.
Usually, I don't like Sinead's work, but this hip-hoppy Celtic mishmash really gets it done for me
Usually I like Sinead's work, but this hip-hoppy Celtic mishmash doesn't get it done for me.
My favorite of hers is "I am Stretched on Your Grave," but I am generally glad to see her work. Hers seems an interesting point of view, at the least.
 ambrebalte wrote:

{#Whisper}  late night and so romeotumaesquely good for the ears{#Music}

 

I agree...  this song is marvelous...

ambrebalte, I hope you are having a lovely time right this minute, you lovely woman...
Thank you RP, for putting a little Sinead into our day.
Every time I hear this woman, I ask myself.....does it get any better?.......and I know it does...it has to, right?...but when she is singing I feel like I am listening to the only singer in the world.
at first i thought that album name said faith and begorrah (on the little cover art - tho it's quite clear in the text below it)
This definitely sounds like Sinead, no doubt. New to me but her voice is quite recognizable. Btw, that is a low whistle in the background not pipes, a nice Irish element nonetheless. Love her for that. ;-)
 fredriley wrote:


The glottal stop is quite common in English regional dialects, particularly in London and the SE.For instance, in Luton - sorry, loo'n - a hard 't' is as rare as rocking horse sh1t. It's a bit surprising to hear an Irishwoman using a glottal stop, though. Nice uillean pipes in the background.
 
Oh, I know, being a Kentish Man (though not a Man of Kent)... I think it's more a case that she sounds somehow silly dropping her t's (esp. since it's only for the chorus). It just doesn't work for me for some reason.
 toomanyollys wrote:
7 for the song.

-6 for saying "little" without pronouncing the t's.
 
 

The glottal stop is quite common in English regional dialects, particularly in London and the SE.For instance, in Luton - sorry, loo'n - a hard 't' is as rare as rocking horse sh1t. It's a bit surprising to hear an Irishwoman using a glottal stop, though. Nice uillean pipes in the background.
Bumped from 7 to 8 with this listen! Delicious...
7 for the song.

-6 for saying "little" without pronouncing the t's.
 
 bwlang wrote:
Anybody else hear a little "cherry wine" in there?

 
 
Sorry.  In Canada.  Not allowed to watch....

This brought tears to my eyes.  But then, so does Johnny B. Goode.
This doesn't sound like Sinead O'Connor!  Proves how versatile she is.  I like this song.{#Sunny}  EDIT:  Sounds like she has Afro-Celt backing her up.  Anyone else hear it?  {#Think}
Amazing voice
Anybody else hear a little "cherry wine" in there?

 
 romeotuma wrote:


This song is good for the ears...
 
{#Whisper}  late night and so romeotumaesquely good for the ears{#Music}

Like this very much.  Surprised me, though, that it was Sinead. 
This could grow on me, Eh start it at a 7
Very good album, this one.
This sounds like a remix and not the one on this disk.  But good!!


This song is good for the ears...