[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]
Thea Gilmore — I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine
Album: Songs From The Gutter
Avg rating:
6.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 84









Released: 2005
Length: 4:26
Plays (last 30 days): 0
I dreamed I saw St Augustine, live as you or me
Tearing through these quarters in the utmost misery
With a blanket underneath his arm and a coat of solid gold
Searching for the very souls who already have been sold

"Arise, arise." He spoke so loud in a voice pulled down with strain
"Come out, ye gifted kings and queens and hear my sad complaint
No mortal is among you know who you can call your own
So go on your way accordingly and call your Lord alone"

I dreamed I saw St Augustine live with fiery breath
I dreamed I was amongst the ones who called him unto death
Oh, I awoke in anger so I wasn't terrified
I put my fingers against the glass and bowed my head and cried
I put my fingers against the glass and bowed my head and cried
Comments (16)add comment
Verification of the greatness of Dylan's work... as long as he's not the one singing it.
 rdo wrote:
The reformation was the triumph of Augustine's doctrine of grace over Augustine's doctrine of the Church.
(I borrowed this)
 
That's the Reformational point of view... For different reasons, Augustine is equally appreciated by Roman Catholic theologians.
 Grammarcop wrote:
St. Augustine does have one thing going for him: He's the patron saint of brewers. 
 
Got a city named after him in Florida with really nice beaches, so there's another thing he's got going fror him.

The reformation was the triumph of Augustine's doctrine of grace over Augustine's doctrine of the Church.
(I borrowed this)
St. Augustine does have one thing going for him: He's the patron saint of brewers. 
 grungepuppy wrote:

Nice!

I just finished reading "Doubt, A History" by Jennifer Hecht. The writings of Augustine (and adoration of them by people like Calvin) were largely responsible for the transition to "belief" being the central action of fundamentalist faith. Previously, religion was more about civic duty, ritual, pleasing the god(s) through actions, etc. For Augustine, the struggle was simply making himself believe the nonsense of it all. Now, actions matter little as long as you have faith. This brand of thinking allows fundamentalists to justify slavery, rape, genocide, and other atrocities because they have the correct deity on their side and they believe in the myth strongly enough.
 
Gotta love revisionist history! Reality is opposite. The pantheistic world of Eurasia justified "slavery, rape and genocide and other atrocities  as their civic duty, ritual and pleasing their gods. (Fetishes, oracles, and unspeakable seasonal sacrifices to the fertility deities).  

I get the idea that beating on Augustine is like trying to beat on fundamentalists and false perceptions about them.

A legitimate complaint about Augustine could be placed on his views on spirituality verse materialism and how they changed as he grew and the debates of that era with the Dontatists, etc.

Augustine, like so many in the later Latin world, lost touch with the roots of their faith that did not separate the material and spiritual. In fact, he had been a devotee to a Persian mystery religion.

Perhaps with the conversion of Emperor Constantine and the centralized location of the holy temple artifacts in the Forum's own Temple of Peace in Rome helped foster an environment where the ancient Greek ideas of spiritual/abstract=good and material/changing=bad could be integrated into the belief of the convert, Augustine (who I believe simply reflected the prevailing zeitgeist of the Latin world).  

Fundamentalists seek to restore the holistic approach of  the spiritual and material - to get past the Latin perceptions back to the historic roots.

Of course it depends on what type of fundamentalists you are talking about. Since you are discussing St. Augie I assume by context that you mean a subset of protestants, which, in general, also seek similar goals. 
 grungepuppy wrote:

Nice!

I just finished reading "Doubt, A History" by Jennifer Hecht. The writings of Augustine (and adoration of them by people like Calvin) were largely responsible for the transition to "belief" being the central action of fundamentalist faith. Previously, religion was more about civic duty, ritual, pleasing the god(s) through actions, etc. For Augustine, the struggle was simply making himself believe the nonsense of it all. Now, actions matter little as long as you have faith. This brand of thinking allows fundamentalists to justify slavery, rape, genocide, and other atrocities because they have the correct deity on their side and they believe in the myth strongly enough.

 

Yeah and he was able to enjoy pleasures of the flesh for many years before deciding it was OK to deny them to others, as well his later self.  Neat trick.
 Otomi wrote:

He's largely to blame for ruining Western civilization for over a millennium and a half, with that "sex is sinful" rubbish. That reminds me of a joke. Eight centuries ago a young Benedictine novice was instructed to copy a theological treatise in the scriptorium of the monastery. As he was handed the recently executed tome of bound parchment which was to serve as a model, he had a moment of revelation. "There must be a lot of accumulated errors in these books, since we make copies of copies of copies," he said to his mentor. "Why don't we locate the oldest surviving volume of each text, and make all of the new copies from it?" he asked. "Surely that would improve the accuracy of our work." The elder monk thought for a moment, nodded, and said, "Yes, go downstairs to the library and find the original document; you can make your copy directly from it." The novice descended the spiral staircase. Several minutes had passed when an anguished scream echoed up the stairs. When the young man returned, his mentor, deeply concerned, asked him what he had seen. The novice replied, "It... it... it says celebrate."
 
Nice!

I just finished reading "Doubt, A History" by Jennifer Hecht. The writings of Augustine (and adoration of them by people like Calvin) were largely responsible for the transition to "belief" being the central action of fundamentalist faith. Previously, religion was more about civic duty, ritual, pleasing the god(s) through actions, etc. For Augustine, the struggle was simply making himself believe the nonsense of it all. Now, actions matter little as long as you have faith. This brand of thinking allows fundamentalists to justify slavery, rape, genocide, and other atrocities because they have the correct deity on their side and they believe in the myth strongly enough.

I prefer the Bob Dylan original, but this is not bad.  Interesting commentary on this song here:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Dreamed_I_Saw_St._Augustine

Love the monk joke - too true!  {#Roflol}

 simme2 wrote:
Amazing song, her voice is out of this world..
 
{#High-five}

ick, or maybe its just a total let down from Parov Stelar

She looks like she saw St. Augustine riding a hephalump. {#Drunk}
 Otomi wrote:

He's largely to blame for ruining Western civilization for over a millennium and a half, with that "sex is sinful" rubbish. That reminds me of a joke. Eight centuries ago a young Benedictine novice was instructed to copy a theological treatise in the scriptorium of the monastery. As he was handed the recently executed tome of bound parchment which was to serve as a model, he had a moment of revelation. "There must be a lot of accumulated errors in these books, since we make copies of copies of copies," he said to his mentor. "Why don't we locate the oldest surviving volume of each text, and make all of the new copies from it?" he asked. "Surely that would improve the accuracy of our work." The elder monk thought for a moment, nodded, and said, "Yes, go downstairs to the library and find the original document; you can make your copy directly from it." The novice descended the spiral staircase. Several minutes had passed when an anguished scream echoed up the stairs. When the young man returned, his mentor, deeply concerned, asked him what he had seen. The novice replied, "It... it... it says "celebrate."
 
Thank you!

 peter_james_bond wrote:
What is it about this Augustine guy that causes songs to be written about him?

https://www.radioparadise.com/content.php?name=songinfo&song_id=41145
 
He's largely to blame for ruining Western civilization for over a millennium and a half, with that "sex is sinful" rubbish. That reminds me of a joke. Eight centuries ago a young Benedictine novice was instructed to copy a theological treatise in the scriptorium of the monastery. As he was handed the recently executed tome of bound parchment which was to serve as a model, he had a moment of revelation. "There must be a lot of accumulated errors in these books, since we make copies of copies of copies," he said to his mentor. "Why don't we locate the oldest surviving volume of each text, and make all of the new copies from it?" he asked. "Surely that would improve the accuracy of our work." The elder monk thought for a moment, nodded, and said, "Yes, go downstairs to the library and find the original document; you can make your copy directly from it." The novice descended the spiral staircase. Several minutes had passed when an anguished scream echoed up the stairs. When the young man returned, his mentor, deeply concerned, asked him what he had seen. The novice replied, "It... it... it says celebrate."
What is it about this Augustine guy that causes songs to be written about him?

https://www.radioparadise.com/content.php?name=songinfo&song_id=41145
Amazing song, her voice is out of this world..