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Mari Boine — In the Hand of the Night
Album: In The Hand Of The Night
Avg rating:
5.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 546









Released: 2006
Length: 5:41
Plays (last 30 days): 0
(no lyrics available)
Comments (117)add comment
This is interesting- thanks, RP. :)
Do I recognize a Weat African Kora in there?
 Otomi wrote:

The Sami have a high frequency of mtDNA haplogroup U5 (around 50%, according to data from the Genographic Project). U5 can be found at lower frequencies in Europe, the Middle East, and northern Africa. Amerinds, or Native Americans (in the broad sense of the term "America", ranging from Canada to Argentina) are mtDNA haplogroups A, B, C, D (and a relatively small percentage of X). The ancestors of both U5 and A-D left Africa and passed through the Middle East, but those of U5 headed northwest to Scandinavia, while those of A-D headed northeast, into Siberia, and from there some eventually migrated into the Americas. (The migration patterns of X are sort of complicated and are still polemic.) Of course we're all related, if you go back about 150,000 or 200,000 years, but the predominant Sami lineage isn't very close to the Amerind lineages, which explains in part why Mari Boine doesn't look much like a Native American woman. I'm haplogroup U5 too, and my mother's family history (she's the source of my mtDNA) all traces back to the British Isles, as far as we know.

Then again, genes and languages are independent variables, and ethnic identity is something you can put on or take off like clothing.

Sorry if I'm being pedantic, but the new genetic data really helps bring our prehistory into focus.

Beautiful music, by the way; this woman is quite an artist, and I admire her for reaching back into her cultural heritage in these days of mind-numbing globalization and consumerism.

 
Bastante interestante.  

BTW, Otomi, westernized traditional music or blends if you prefer are all part of the 'globalization' process that has been going on since Europeans developed long boats.
Ok... I _love_ the eclectic collection of music you expose us to but... this is a more than a bit of a reach. 
Perfectly horrid.
Sounds like Mongolian Smurfs chanting!  I kinda like it = 6
 25demayo wrote:
Around the music world with RP. You've got to love it. 

Taking me places I will probably never go. Thanks RP 

 
Well said!
Featuring Yoko Ono
 CHuLoYo wrote:
5.3 really? This is meritory almost 7!

 Gave it an 8 to start


Around the music world with RP. You've got to love it. 

Taking me places I will probably never go. Thanks RP 
5.3 really? This is meritory almost 7!
 duckwater wrote:
We are truly fortunate to have such a great eclectic station to listen too!  The "DJ" is a genius at introducing interestong music from around the world!  Thanks to Radio Paradise!
 
Hear, hear!
Clever modern interpretation. 

Nice groove. 
Good tribal sound. 8 :)
 duckwater wrote:
We are truly fortunate to have such a great eclectic station to listen too!  The "DJ" is a genius at introducing interestong music from around the world!  Thanks to Radio Paradise!
 
Very true!
Double Plus Good!! ++
The intro to this sounds like a recent Robert Plant solo effort. I Forget the name of the tune.
She is wonderful.  Her ethereal Eallin (Life) gets a 10 from me.
We are truly fortunate to have such a great eclectic station to listen too!  The "DJ" is a genius at introducing interestong music from around the world!  Thanks to Radio Paradise!
{{{-YIKES-}}} {#Eek} 
wow, have never heard, am really enjoying this!
Although this language kinda irks me but the song itself is masterful, unlike many non-english tunes on RP.
Long live Sami folk!
Nice to hear her again....its been a long while for me! Yay!
 Businessgypsy wrote:
Listening to this over a braised acculturated earth-native ear with fava beans. As with this song, parts of it are okay - but I do encounter a bit of gristle here and there.



 
A Beauty Hannibal, errrr.. I mean Businessgypsy!  Cheers
 handyrae wrote:
I can very much enjoy any one of her songs that I've heard played on RP, but I'm sure if I were listening to the entire CD, I'd be ripping it from the player and hurling it across the room around the third song.
 
I would not recommend that you buy this CD then — I am not likely to either — but one of the great things about RP is that you can listen to the individual tunes here at different times.  There are a lot of songs that I hear and enjoy here, but I may not enjoy the whole CDs that those songs are on.
 handyrae wrote:
I can very much enjoy any one of her songs that I've heard played on RP, but I'm sure if I were listening to the entire CD, I'd be ripping it from the player and hurling it across the room around the third song.
 


I find that most of that album is in fact quite enjoyable. Good stuff!
Nothing musical about this.  Painful to the point I must exercise my option to mute.
 fredriley wrote:
Mari Boine's work has some similarities to Native American songs, to my very untutored ear, which makes me wonder: is there any genetic relation between Native American and Sami peoples? Other than being human, of course.

I'm surprised that her work rates so low on RP - it sounds pretty accessible to me and not over-exotic for the Western ear. It's really growing on me :o)
 

See below (May 29, 2009).
I am surprised to see so many negative reactions to this.  I don't hear any dissonance at all, and I've been keening my ear to find some.  It's not in a typical major or minor scale, but that's not the same thing. The rhythms are really fascinating, and the texture is intensely varied.  It has plenty of what I value most in music, which is coherence.
Mari Boine's work has some similarities to Native American songs, to my very untutored ear, which makes me wonder: is there any genetic relation between Native American and Sami peoples? Other than being human, of course.

I'm surprised that her work rates so low on RP - it sounds pretty accessible to me and not over-exotic for the Western ear. It's really growing on me :o)
This is very interesting and different stuff....gotta get back into her!
Very cool and danceable to boot! {#Sunny}
 garycha wrote:

DNQ


 
diazonaphthoquinone?

DNQ


jadewahoo wrote:
...To the acculturated earth-native ear this sounds dynamically expressive...
Listening to this over a braised acculturated earth-native ear with fava beans. As with this song, parts of it are okay - but I do encounter a bit of gristle here and there.


 jadewahoo wrote:
Different cultures have different tonal ranges and emphasis. To the Western ear this may sound dissonant. To the acculturated earth-native ear this sounds dynamically expressive.

Me, I like it.
 

My western ear thinks this bites...my eastern ear agrees.
 jadewahoo wrote:
Different cultures have different tonal ranges and emphasis. To the Western ear this may sound dissonant. To the acculturated earth-native ear this sounds dynamically expressive.

Me, I like it.
 
What you said...... Me too

Here is a video by Mona J. Hoel :
 " Vuolgge mu mielde Bassivárrái ("Come With Me to the Sacred Mountain) is a dream of freedom from Western civilization's oppression of minorities. Mari Boine portrays a woman who tries to escape from the darkness, the bleak conditions of the Sami people after the Norwegian colonization."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umNEnyxxFxE
Beautiful beautiful song...
{#Smile}
not my cup of tea
horrible
I like it.
Please tell me this song is almost over...
 alux wrote:
Earth-native ear?!
 
As opposed to Mars-native ears?

Yuck.
 countyman wrote:

If that's a photo of Norway, then you'd be correct.

 

Norway on Mushrooms....
 SirLars wrote:
Sounds like what you'd get if you put Paul Simon and yoko Ono in a blender.
And that's not good.
 

Haaaaaaaaaaa.....!!! Good one!
at least some kind of start,
after 15x BS in a row!

Earth-native ear?!

I think it probably sounds most dynamically expressive if you happen to understand Saami.  


 
jadewahoo wrote:
Different cultures have different tonal ranges and emphasis. To the Western ear this may sound dissonant. To the acculturated earth-native ear this sounds dynamically expressive.

Me, I like it.
 


I can very much enjoy any one of her songs that I've heard played on RP, but I'm sure if I were listening to the entire CD, I'd be ripping it from the player and hurling it across the room around the third song.
I just threw up. {#Lol}
 callum wrote:
I love it. Very interesting hearing some other peoples local folk music.  Also I love how polarised the opinions are - lovely little double bell shaped curve on this graph.
 
This is one of the reasons I love RP.  TRUE diversity.  And I happen to find this one very interesting....

Sounds like what you'd get if you put Paul Simon and yoko Ono in a blender.
And that's not good.
I love it. Very interesting hearing some other peoples local folk music.  Also I love how polarised the opinions are - lovely little double bell shaped curve on this graph.
 fuh2 wrote:

Reminds me of when I was taken on a guided tour of Canyon De Chelly which is a Navajo sacred region.

Most beautiful place in the Southwest. This photo does no justice.



 
20 years or so ago we also toured Canyon De Chelly.  First on horseback and then on the Indian run military jeeps and trucks.  On both tours we had calm serene scenes and then fast racing.  Our guides had great respect for their past.  They also had a lot of fun with racing up and down the river.  It was a blast.

And you're right about the photo.

walcum te rerdio paredesio

Different cultures have different tonal ranges and emphasis. To the Western ear this may sound dissonant. To the acculturated earth-native ear this sounds dynamically expressive.

Me, I like it.
 jedley wrote:
Just because it's exotic doesn't mean it's good, and this song is definitive proof of it. Let's hear some Tinawiren instead, pleeez? {#Wave}
 
I like it.  That means it IS good.  {#Lol}
The reason so much people dislikes it is cause is not western music and we are not get used to it I guess...
 shutter wrote:
The singer's voice is grating.  Sorry. 
 

 .. yes, there is an uncomfortable level in my VU's .....
So much Sucko-barfo,,,,,,,,
Leonard is that you in the background?
Dennis Leary, please call your office.
 sub-arctic wrote:



This might be a bit closer to Mari Boine's home country...

 
If that's a photo of Norway, then you'd be correct.

The singer's voice is grating.  Sorry. 
 fuh2 wrote:

Reminds me of when I was taken on a guided tour of Canyon De Chelly which is a Navajo sacred region.

Most beautiful place in the Southwest. This photo does no justice.

 


This might be a bit closer to Mari Boine's home country...

Just because it's exotic doesn't mean it's good, and this song is definitive proof of it. Let's hear some Tinawiren instead, pleeez? {#Wave}
 AdyMiles wrote:
Please can we have some English music instead of all this electic rambling and noises?
 
In the past few hours we've heard the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Police, and the Rolling Stones.
That's a lot of English music!

Please make it stop.
 AdyMiles wrote:
Please can we have some English music instead of all this electic rambling and noises?
 
Never forget that if you don't like something you can turn it down or find a different place to listen to music. That's the beauty of being free.{#Yes}
 AdyMiles wrote:
Please can we have some English music instead of all this electic rambling and noises?
 
 I fear, sir, that you are in the wrong establishment.
 AdyMiles wrote:
Please can we have some English music instead of all this electic rambling and noises?
 
Boy, are you in the wrong place if eclectic (I suppose that is what you meant, or was it some kind of noisy, rambling election that bothers you?) is not your thing...

I kind of like this.  7

So it's YOU who knows the preferences of the "general RP audience".... {#Lol}

 
peter_james_bond wrote:

{#Rolleyes} Buddy, that kind of ignorant (and racist) comment is going to go over real well with Bill, Rebecca, and the general RP audience.

 


 AdyMiles wrote:
Please can we have some English music instead of all this electic rambling and noises?
 
{#Rolleyes} Buddy, that kind of ignorant (and racist) comment is going to go over real well with Bill, Rebecca, and the general RP audience.

She's mixing too much in one pot, stil nice so...
 AdyMiles wrote:
Please can we have some English music instead of all this electic rambling and noises?
 
I dig electric noise, English and otherwise!
 AdyMiles wrote:
Please can we have some English music instead of all this electic rambling and noises?
 

polite cough
Please can we have some English music instead of all this electic rambling and noises?
I don't care what language it is, or what it translates to—I like it!!
this landscape is beautiful...........

 
fuh2 wrote:

Reminds me of when I was taken on a guided tour of Canyon De Chelly which is a Navajo sacred region.

Most beautiful place in the Southwest. This photo does no justice.



 


Great song, thanks for keeping this one in rotation BillG.
True "world" music.  I like it BECAUSE it is different.  Sounds a BIT like Native American music.

 vit wrote:
Glad I gave this one a chance.
Yes, what you said.

I still find the cover art rather distracting.

The beats in the intro sound like Michael Jackson's They don't really care about us. I like that song better though, this one's a little generic.
Glad I gave this one a chance.
Your comment sucks. You must be some sort of "Young Arizonan Against Native Culture League" member or somesuch.

 
whtahtefcuk wrote:
God D#@$&*^ This sucks!!!!  Good Grief.
 


Jammin' song!  {#Sunny}

Reminds me of when I was taken on a guided tour of Canyon De Chelly which is a Navajo sacred region.

Most beautiful place in the Southwest. This photo does no justice.



Is this our Mari? 

God D#@$&*^ This sucks!!!!  Good Grief.
 Otomi wrote:

The Sami have a high frequency of mtDNA haplogroup U5 (around 50%, according to data from the Genographic Project). U5 can be found at lower frequencies in Europe, the Middle East, and northern Africa. Amerinds, or Native Americans (in the broad sense of the term "America", ranging from Canada to Argentina) are mtDNA haplogroups A, B, C, D (and a relatively small percentage of X). The ancestors of both U5 and A-D left Africa and passed through the Middle East, but those of U5 headed northwest to Scandinavia, while those of A-D headed northeast, into Siberia, and from there some eventually migrated into the Americas. (The migration patterns of X are sort of complicated and are still polemic.) Of course we're all related, if you go back about 150,000 or 200,000 years, but the predominant Sami lineage isn't very close to the Amerind lineages, which explains in part why Mari Boine doesn't look much like a Native American woman. I'm haplogroup U5 too, and my mother's family history (she's the source of my mtDNA) all traces back to the British Isles, as far as we know.

Then again, genes and languages are independent variables, and ethnic identity is something you can put on or take off like clothing.

Sorry if I'm being pedantic, but the new genetic data really helps bring our prehistory into focus.

Beautiful music, by the way; this woman is quite an artist, and I admire her for reaching back into her cultural heritage in these days of mind-numbing globalization and consumerism.

Fascinating - thanks for this Otomi! 

Actually, listening to this piece, I can understand why one w;ould believe 1st nations people in America and the Sami were related.




This is groovy...


Sure are a lot of listeners that have rated this as Sucko-Barf!!!

     HINT?

 whtahtefcuk wrote:
yIA yEA yIAS... CRAP
 
Yeah, it relaxes me too.
 FlatCat wrote:
Funny. I love world music. I lived in Scandanavia for a while. But boy do I ever not like this stuff. Whiny. 
 
Agreed!!! (except I have not lived in Scandanavia, but I have 2 of their cars)

Creamed spinach. I am scowling like a little kid, but Bill's not going to let me leave the table until I swallow to every bit of this album (pablum). Pwah.


dorkmeister wrote:
Who besides me would pay to see Joan Osbourne and Jewel wrestle in a vat of pudding?

Ha, some great imagery...I'm sure it would be a sell-out performance.

Who besides me would pay to see Joan Osbourne and Jewel wrestle in a vat of pudding?
yIA yEA yIAS... CRAP
 lawman wrote:
Well I like this one (as opposed to some of the others of this CD).

I figured that maybe Mari Boine herself doesn't actually look like a Native American woman (as per cover), so I Wiki'd her: how interesting: she's a Lapp, aka Sami — thus proving that those folks walked all the way across Scandinvavia and Siberia  to find warmer lands down in the Plains of the USA and beyond.  Uh — there y'are: a history of the half the world in one sentence.
 
The Sami have a high frequency of mtDNA haplogroup U5 (around 50%, according to data from the Genographic Project). U5 can be found at lower frequencies in Europe, the Middle East, and northern Africa. Amerinds, or Native Americans (in the broad sense of the term "America", ranging from Canada to Argentina) are mtDNA haplogroups A, B, C, D (and a relatively small percentage of X). The ancestors of both U5 and A-D left Africa and passed through the Middle East, but those of U5 headed northwest to Scandinavia, while those of A-D headed northeast, into Siberia, and from there some eventually migrated into the Americas. (The migration patterns of X are sort of complicated and are still polemic.) Of course we're all related, if you go back about 150,000 or 200,000 years, but the predominant Sami lineage isn't very close to the Amerind lineages, which explains in part why Mari Boine doesn't look much like a Native American woman. I'm haplogroup U5 too, and my mother's family history (she's the source of my mtDNA) all traces back to the British Isles, as far as we know.

Then again, genes and languages are independent variables, and ethnic identity is something you can put on or take off like clothing.

Sorry if I'm being pedantic, but the new genetic data really helps bring our prehistory into focus.

Beautiful music, by the way; this woman is quite an artist, and I admire her for reaching back into her cultural heritage in these days of mind-numbing globalization and consumerism.
Funny. I love world music. I lived in Scandanavia for a while. But boy do I ever not like this stuff. Whiny. 
NOT FOR ME... Sucko Barf

I was pretty sure I was going to hate this song when it started, now I don't want it to end.....excellent.

Mari on MySpace



Well I like this one (as opposed to some of the others of this CD).

I figured that maybe Mari Boine herself doesn't actually look like a Native American woman (as per cover), so I Wiki'd her: how interesting: she's a Lapp, aka Sami — thus proving that those folks walked all the way across Scandinvavia and Siberia  to find warmer lands down in the Plains of the USA and beyond.  Uh — there y'are: a history of the half the world in one sentence.
STOP IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 Wizzuvv_oz wrote:
whoa...
why all the 1s?   Pretty good I think.  Am I missing something?  
 
No — I think it's the "ones" who are missing something!  Mari Boine is fantastic, this is a great album.
whoa...
why all the 1s?   Pretty good I think.  Am I missing something?  


Good, I was worried I was the only one making the Lollypop Guild connection.
god_exists_but wrote:
Bjork's visit to Oz, with the Chipmunks joining the Munchkins on this dandy.
 

 god_exists_but wrote:
Bjork's visit to Oz, with the Chipmunks joining the Munchkins on this dandy.
 
{#Lol}   And an all-Ewok choir providing harmonies?



RP should play Adjagas — groovy Sami music as well.


8 for the music + 1 for having used a Sami language = 9


 von_Hayek wrote:
Again..... {#Puke}
 

I'll see your {#Puke} and raise you {#Puke}{#Puke}{#Puke}.


Unique...  what can I say?  I love quirky stuff...


Again..... {#Puke}
{#Puke}