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Marc Cohn — Dance Back From The Grave
Album: Join The Parade
Avg rating:
6.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 877









Released: 2007
Length: 4:39
Plays (last 30 days): 0
I used to wake up every morning saying I must be getting away with something here
Every day was like parole before the levees overflowed; I refuse to think it could all just disappear (I refuse to think)
How long before the street car rattles down St. Charles Avenue and beads swing from two hundred year old trees
How long before they walk down long Lake Pontchartrain with the smell of just magnolia on the breeze
Yeah I've seen people laughing all the way down to the cemeteries just to send another soul off on its way
Yeah I've seen them dance right up to the edge of it
But this time their gonna dance back from the grave

Dance back
Dance back
Dance back
Dance back from the grave

Well a thousand souls crossed over and they were greeted by an all-star band
And while the saints go marching in there's still hell to pay back down in Dixie Land
Yeah the storms are headed south again and the hour's getting pretty late
Somebody better build that levee its already Mardi Gras at heavens gate (yeah)

Dance back
Dance back
Dance back
Dance back from the grave
Dance back
Dance back
Get your tambourines, slide trombones
And dance back from the grave
Oh yeah, ooh yeah, ooh yeah

So don't shed a tear for them tonight as they circle and swoop and promenade
They're just carrying their torches and marching in a heavenly parade
No don't shed a tear but take their cue there's only one thing left to do in the name of every soul we didn't save
From the ninth ward to the quarter to the Mississippi border dance back from the grave

Dance back
Dance back
Dance back
Dance back from the grave
Dance back
Dance back
Get your tambourines, slide trombones
And dance back from the grave
Oh yeah, oh yeah
Get your tambourines, slide trombones
And dance back from the grave
Comments (112)add comment
Cool Song - 8

Greetings from Bavaria to all the liseners outside. Stay safe!
 TJS wrote:
I can't say that I really like it. 
 
So you just like it then?
Reminds me a bit of Robbie Robertson's Somewhere Down the Crazy River.
Like!
2019
cool
 sfyi2001 wrote:



 
true. but clint you gotta know that clint loves the jazz in nola. and tipitinas for non freak show or the marsalis club. the place has serous class too. never underestimate new orleans underbelly of good taste. not everything is deep fried. but man, did they ever get screwed over!




  maybe re-post Carnival Day 2010 Businessgypsy  ( or any of your photos : )

Businessgypsy wrote:

Um, nope. Marc Cohn is a very professional artist, and this song is a well crafted vignette sanitized for your protection - but it's another installment in his travelogue 'O songs schtick along with "Walking in Memphis". No real New Orleans cred here except a borrowed idea that is calculated to draw on a few heartstrings from an artist of the, ah..Northern persuasion. Nothing wrong with that, and the interest is appreciated - especially if it does some good. Not to be confused with the actual article, however.

So, if you're thinking this is NOLA goodness, you've been away way too long. I can fix that! Come with me and my crappy iPhone camera down to the Marigny* for Carnival Day 2010. Just watch where you're steppin'.

*Most of the national coverage of Mardi Gras centers on the big night time float parades of the super krewes (like Bacchus) that have celebrity Kings and Queens, or the drunk frat boy noise on Bourbon Street. All of that has its charms, but for me the real carnival happens in the neighborhoods. From families that spend months on elaborate costumes themed around an inside joke to drag queens in architectural juggernauts, the folks who live in New Orleans' more creative neighborhoods come out in force on Mardi Gras day. The tourists have pretty much gone home, and the music, food, drink and fun happen on the street level. Krewes range from small batches of friends (like the Skeleton Krewe) to pretty large groups (such as St. Anne's and the St. Anthony Ramblers). Some costumes are political, some sweet. There are risqué getups and really bad visual puns. Babies and grannies, the überhip and Buddy from down Kerlerec Street all meet for a day of fun that unites everybody in the pursuit of happiness.

Although primarily shot in the Marigny, there are some scenes around St.Charles Cathedral in Jackson Square and a few from the gay end of Bourbon to showcase the insane costumes featured in the Bourbon Street Awards. Contestants this year portrayed the New Orleans Opera House on fire and the gone-but-not-forgotten K&B Drug Store chain. Can't imagine why the army wouldn't want someone that can engineer something that elaborate and carry it around all day. The opening shot is of garbage on Bourbon Street - exactly why I avoid that area generally. If there seems to be an emphasis on beautiful women, there is. My hair may be gray, but I still have parts that are stuck on 18.

I think the guy in the Napoleon Bonaparte costume (complete with shackles) playing guitar in front of the Cabildo is Alex Chilton. Amazing musician and normally a recluse (sadly, Alex died in NOLA on St. Patrick's day after this. I hadn't seen him in the street in years, thought the weight gain possible. Great player and clever songs, but not Alex). The sign for Hove Parfumeur marks the shop that inspired Tom Robbin's wonderful Jitterbug Perfumenovel. Keep a look out for people dressed as crashing Toyotas, Ray Nagin's fear-mongering Shadow Government, St. Sebastian (who was martyred from arrow wounds), Pee-Wee's Playhouse, the crew of the Minnow, freaky tiny horses, a sidewalk squid and every Saints theme imaginable. The line for drinks in front of the R Bar (8am) is a little unusual. There's also a very good object lesson on why you shouldn't try to drive a car down Frenchmen Street on Mardi Gras Day. Brad and Angelina are in there somewhere, but enjoying anonymity like everyone else.

  
Cynaera wrote:

Thank you for this - there are a LOT of very interesting, eye-catching, sad, amusing and poignant pictures in your gallery.  And your descriptions and observations are incredibly articulate and astute.  Mardi Gras for someone in a western landlocked state (uh, that'd be me) is puzzling at best, and at worst, frightening. I think I get it now - at least, in part.  There's an expression called "whistling in the dark" which refers to making noise to scare away whatever big, scary monsters might be lurking in one's path. Somehow, Mardi Gras is like that - people dancing, dressing up, drinking, laughing, and throwing caution to the winds for a brief time. They know what's "out there," and it's as if they're daring the darkness to do its worst. They know they're survivors, and they rejoice in that knowledge. Maybe there's also a little birdie-flip to the Big Guy.

The spirit, heart and soul of Louisiana just makes me choke up. Maybe I have it all wrong... But thank you for sharing YOUR  Louisiana with us, Businessgypsy. (Note to self: Go there before you die!){#Daisy}

 
to my ear he does have a Knopfler-Costello weirdness to his voice        Peace folks
Dance back from The Brave.
For those of you crapping on Marc Cohn, you should know that when he was first hitting the airwaves on "The Cities 97", (a Minneapolis grassroots station that played a lot of up and coming artists) Marc played a two hour FREE concert at the Lake Harriet bandshell which it was estimated 40,000 people attended, IN THE RAIN.  There were umbrellas in every direction as far as the eye could see, right up to the last song.  He gets a TEN.
Let's hear the story about YOUR musical greatness.....?  I bet you're all a bunch of basement guitar hero wannabees who've never set foot on a stage.
 MiracleDrug wrote:

good point..
 
My, my, we do have a bit of a THING about "rules", don't we?  Music is art, and the best artists BREAK the rules.  If you want rules, go do your taxes.
 fredriley wrote:
The chorus is fine, but I do wish he'd sing rather than speak. Poets speak lyrics, singers sing them.
 
good point...

The chorus is fine, but I do wish he'd sing rather than speak. Poets speak lyrics, singers sing them.
 Van Morrison- esq (chorus)


 rabbi_phil wrote:

How 'bout Mark Knopfler meets Elvis Costello.
 
Whoa....that's deep.....{#Silenced}
 Pyro wrote:
Mark is sort of Bruce Cockburn meets Tom Waits.  This has grown on me.  6 ==> 7
 
How 'bout Mark Knopfler meets Elvis Costello.


 MortimerS wrote:

I responded to someone who compared this guys music to Waits.  So, yeah, your ability to parse comments is flawed. People keep saying "You have to understand New Orleans". I am pretty sure I do understand and it is pathetic.

Got the levy built yet? You've been discussing it since 1890.

Oh yeah, that's right you need someone else to pay for it because you have ghosts dancing to jazz in the streets.

Pathetic.

 
Your comment sir offends me, your ignorance of the suffering that occurred after Katrina is pathetic.  Oh, for you information it is the responsibility of the federal government to build/maintain the levy's that exist in this country.  As someone pointed out to me, if Louisiana was it's own country and charged for all of it's natural resources, it would be one of the richest countries in the world and the levy problem would not exist.

Most excellent pictures!
 
Businessgypsy wrote:

Um, nope. Marc Cohn is a very professional artist, and this song is a well crafted vignette sanitized for your protection - but it's another installment in his travelogue 'O songs schtick along with "Walking in Memphis". No real New Orleans cred here except a borrowed idea that is calculated to draw on a few heartstrings from an artist of the, ah..Northern persuasion. Nothing wrong with that, and the interest is appreciated - especially if it does some good. Not to be confused with the actual article, however.

So, if you're thinking this is NOLA goodness, you've been away way too long. I can fix that! Come with me and my crappy iPhone camera down to the Marigny* for Carnival Day 2010. Just watch where you're steppin'.

*Most of the national coverage of Mardi Gras centers on the big night time float parades of the super krewes (like Bacchus) that have celebrity Kings and Queens, or the drunk frat boy noise on Bourbon Street. All of that has its charms, but for me the real carnival happens in the neighborhoods. From families that spend months on elaborate costumes themed around an inside joke to drag queens in architectural juggernauts, the folks who live in New Orleans' more creative neighborhoods come out in force on Mardi Gras day. The tourists have pretty much gone home, and the music, food, drink and fun happen on the street level. Krewes range from small batches of friends (like the Skeleton Krewe) to pretty large groups (such as St. Anne's and the St. Anthony Ramblers). Some costumes are political, some sweet. There are risqué getups and really bad visual puns. Babies and grannies, the überhip and Buddy from down Kerlerec Street all meet for a day of fun that unites everybody in the pursuit of happiness.

Although primarily shot in the Marigny, there are some scenes around St.Charles Cathedral in Jackson Square and a few from the gay end of Bourbon to showcase the insane costumes featured in the Bourbon Street Awards. Contestants this year portrayed the New Orleans Opera House on fire and the gone-but-not-forgotten K&B Drug Store chain. Can't imagine why the army wouldn't want someone that can engineer something that elaborate and carry it around all day. The opening shot is of garbage on Bourbon Street - exactly why I avoid that area generally. If there seems to be an emphasis on beautiful women, there is. My hair may be gray, but I still have parts that are stuck on 18.

I think the guy in the Napoleon Bonaparte costume (complete with shackles) playing guitar in front of the Cabildo is Alex Chilton. Amazing musician and normally a recluse (sadly, Alex died in NOLA on St. Patrick's day after this. I hadn't seen him in the street in years, thought the weight gain possible. Great player and clever songs, but not Alex). The sign for Hove Parfumeur marks the shop that inspired Tom Robbin's wonderful Jitterbug Perfume novel. Keep a look out for people dressed as crashing Toyotas, Ray Nagin's fear-mongering Shadow Government, St. Sebastian (who was martyred from arrow wounds), Pee-Wee's Playhouse, the crew of the Minnow, freaky tiny horses, a sidewalk squid and every Saints theme imaginable. The line for drinks in front of the R Bar (8am) is a little unusual. There's also a very good object lesson on why you shouldn't try to drive a car down Frenchmen Street on Mardi Gras Day. Brad and Angelina are in there somewhere, but enjoying anonymity like everyone else.

 


Can't not rock out to this  {#Bananajam}
Gunna have to add this one to the Halloween mixed-tape.
I really dislike this song.  TO me the chorus is like fingernails dragged across a chalkboard.
 Businessgypsy wrote:

Um, nope. Marc Cohn is a very professional artist, and this song is a well crafted vignette sanitized for your protection - but it's another installment in his travelogue 'O songs schtick along with "Walking in Memphis". No real New Orleans cred here except a borrowed idea that is calculated to draw on a few heartstrings from an artist of the, ah..Northern persuasion. Nothing wrong with that, and the interest is appreciated - especially if it does some good. Not to be confused with the actual article, however.

So, if you're thinking this is NOLA goodness, you've been away way too long. I can fix that! Come with me and my crappy iPhone camera down to the Marigny* for Carnival Day 2010. Just watch where you're steppin'.

*Most of the national coverage of Mardi Gras centers on the big night time float parades of the super krewes (like Bacchus) that have celebrity Kings and Queens, or the drunk frat boy noise on Bourbon Street. All of that has its charms, but for me the real carnival happens in the neighborhoods. From families that spend months on elaborate costumes themed around an inside joke to drag queens in architectural juggernauts, the folks who live in New Orleans' more creative neighborhoods come out in force on Mardi Gras day. The tourists have pretty much gone home, and the music, food, drink and fun happen on the street level. Krewes range from small batches of friends (like the Skeleton Krewe) to pretty large groups (such as St. Anne's and the St. Anthony Ramblers). Some costumes are political, some sweet. There are risqué getups and really bad visual puns. Babies and grannies, the überhip and Buddy from down Kerlerec Street all meet for a day of fun that unites everybody in the pursuit of happiness.

Although primarily shot in the Marigny, there are some scenes around St.Charles Cathedral in Jackson Square and a few from the gay end of Bourbon to showcase the insane costumes featured in the Bourbon Street Awards. Contestants this year portrayed the New Orleans Opera House on fire and the gone-but-not-forgotten K&B Drug Store chain. Can't imagine why the army wouldn't want someone that can engineer something that elaborate and carry it around all day. The opening shot is of garbage on Bourbon Street - exactly why I avoid that area generally. If there seems to be an emphasis on beautiful women, there is. My hair may be gray, but I still have parts that are stuck on 18.

I think the guy in the Napoleon Bonaparte costume (complete with shackles) playing guitar in front of the Cabildo is Alex Chilton. Amazing musician and normally a recluse (sadly, Alex died in NOLA on St. Patrick's day after this. I hadn't seen him in the street in years, thought the weight gain possible. Great player and clever songs, but not Alex). The sign for Hove Parfumeur marks the shop that inspired Tom Robbin's wonderful Jitterbug Perfume novel. Keep a look out for people dressed as crashing Toyotas, Ray Nagin's fear-mongering Shadow Government, St. Sebastian (who was martyred from arrow wounds), Pee-Wee's Playhouse, the crew of the Minnow, freaky tiny horses, a sidewalk squid and every Saints theme imaginable. The line for drinks in front of the R Bar (8am) is a little unusual. There's also a very good object lesson on why you shouldn't try to drive a car down Frenchmen Street on Mardi Gras Day. Brad and Angelina are in there somewhere, but enjoying anonymity like everyone else.


 
Thank you for this - there are a LOT of very interesting, eye-catching, sad, amusing and poignant pictures in your gallery.  And your descriptions and observations are incredibly articulate and astute.  Mardi Gras for someone in a western landlocked state (uh, that'd be me) is puzzling at best, and at worst, frightening. I think I get it now - at least, in part.  There's an expression called "whistling in the dark" which refers to making noise to scare away whatever big, scary monsters might be lurking in one's path. Somehow, Mardi Gras is like that - people dancing, dressing up, drinking, laughing, and throwing caution to the winds for a brief time. They know what's "out there," and it's as if they're daring the darkness to do its worst. They know they're survivors, and they rejoice in that knowledge. Maybe there's also a little birdie-flip to the Big Guy.

The spirit, heart and soul of Louisiana just makes me choke up. Maybe I have it all wrong... But thank you for sharing YOUR  Louisiana with us, Businessgypsy. (Note to self: Go there before you die!){#Daisy}
...shouldn't this really be preceded by when the levee breaks?..
The more I hear this piece, the more I like it.  Sadly, the lyrics are still all too relevant.
 MortimerS wrote:

Got the levy built yet? You've been discussing it since 1890.

Oh yeah, that's right you need someone else to pay for it ...
 

Yeah, just like your dams, highways, and all the levys from Cairo, IL to Venice, LA.  We all pay for all our collective infrastructure.

It's about the music.
mrdak wrote:
I guess if your not from NOLA this is kind of odd. I was born and raised there. So this is crescent city goodness.

Um, nope. Marc Cohn is a very professional artist, and this song is a well crafted vignette sanitized for your protection - but it's another installment in his travelogue 'O songs schtick along with "Walking in Memphis". No real New Orleans cred here except a borrowed idea that is calculated to draw on a few heartstrings from an artist of the, ah..Northern persuasion. Nothing wrong with that, and the interest is appreciated - especially if it does some good. Not to be confused with the actual article, however.

So, if you're thinking this is NOLA goodness, you've been away way too long. I can fix that! Come with me and my crappy iPhone camera down to the Marigny* for Carnival Day 2010. Just watch where you're steppin'.

*Most of the national coverage of Mardi Gras centers on the big night time float parades of the super krewes (like Bacchus) that have celebrity Kings and Queens, or the drunk frat boy noise on Bourbon Street. All of that has its charms, but for me the real carnival happens in the neighborhoods. From families that spend months on elaborate costumes themed around an inside joke to drag queens in architectural juggernauts, the folks who live in New Orleans' more creative neighborhoods come out in force on Mardi Gras day. The tourists have pretty much gone home, and the music, food, drink and fun happen on the street level. Krewes range from small batches of friends (like the Skeleton Krewe) to pretty large groups (such as St. Anne's and the St. Anthony Ramblers). Some costumes are political, some sweet. There are risqué getups and really bad visual puns. Babies and grannies, the überhip and Buddy from down Kerlerec Street all meet for a day of fun that unites everybody in the pursuit of happiness.

Although primarily shot in the Marigny, there are some scenes around St.Charles Cathedral in Jackson Square and a few from the gay end of Bourbon to showcase the insane costumes featured in the Bourbon Street Awards. Contestants this year portrayed the New Orleans Opera House on fire and the gone-but-not-forgotten K&B Drug Store chain. Can't imagine why the army wouldn't want someone that can engineer something that elaborate and carry it around all day. The opening shot is of garbage on Bourbon Street - exactly why I avoid that area generally. If there seems to be an emphasis on beautiful women, there is. My hair may be gray, but I still have parts that are stuck on 18.

I think the guy in the Napoleon Bonaparte costume (complete with shackles) playing guitar in front of the Cabildo is Alex Chilton. Amazing musician and normally a recluse (sadly, Alex died in NOLA on St. Patrick's day after this. I hadn't seen him in the street in years, thought the weight gain possible. Great player and clever songs, but not Alex). The sign for Hove Parfumeur marks the shop that inspired Tom Robbin's wonderful Jitterbug Perfume novel. Keep a look out for people dressed as crashing Toyotas, Ray Nagin's fear-mongering Shadow Government, St. Sebastian (who was martyred from arrow wounds), Pee-Wee's Playhouse, the crew of the Minnow, freaky tiny horses, a sidewalk squid and every Saints theme imaginable. The line for drinks in front of the R Bar (8am) is a little unusual. There's also a very good object lesson on why you shouldn't try to drive a car down Frenchmen Street on Mardi Gras Day. Brad and Angelina are in there somewhere, but enjoying anonymity like everyone else.


 MortimerS wrote:

I responded to someone who compared this guys music to Waits.  So, yeah, your ability to parse comments is flawed. People keep saying "You have to understand New Orleans". I am pretty sure I do understand and it is pathetic.

Got the levy built yet? You've been discussing it since 1890.

Oh yeah, that's right you need someone else to pay for it because you have ghosts dancing to jazz in the streets.

Pathetic.

 
Oops, guilty of what I just yelled at someone else for. My apologies.

 mrdak wrote:
Bill........................... play some radiators...... Suck Da head.. Squeeze the Tips... {#Yes}
 
I responded to someone who compared this guys music to Waits.  So, yeah, your ability to parse comments is flawed. People keep saying "You have to understand New Orleans". I am pretty sure I do understand and it is pathetic.

Got the levy built yet? You've been discussing it since 1890.

Oh yeah, that's right you need someone else to pay for it because you have ghosts dancing to jazz in the streets.

Pathetic.

I'm right in there...  singing along...  I LOVE this song! 

Please folks, support your favorite charities with an extra bit of positive outlook for the New Year!
Bill........................... play some radiators...... Suck Da head.. Squeeze the Tips... {#Yes}
I guess if your not from NOLA this is kind of odd. I was born and raised there. So this is crescent city goodness.
If you compare this to Waits...... your more than odd. You're an idiot..... {#Doh}  ouch!  yeah I heard dat... I hope it hurt.

That's a beautiful album cover. The type, the photo, the colour - fantastic.
 lattalo wrote:

I guess you have to love New Orleans to really get this, and no this is not like the crap
Tom Waits puts out.

 
Guy couldn't hold Waits jockstrap for lyrics and yeah I get the cheesy NO bent thought. He must've spent a lot of time attempting to sound just like Jagger and failing.

This would be a perfect segue to the Cave Singers, Dancing on our Graves....
Cool, I just lunched on St. Charles Ave. near some beautiful oak trees about 15 minutes ago.
I like it, but the rest of the album isn't nearly as good.
ANd if you liked this one whay not check out Manchesters own Barry Adamson
This flood set needs Joe Bonamassa's Great Flood...

Okay, Bill. Now you're breaking my heart ... but thanks for reminding me tomorrow is the anniversary of Katrina.

Chris Rea...Texas!


 giotto wrote:
Sounds cool, but also a little like a Tom Waits rip-off. {#Evil}
 
I guess you have to love New Orleans to really get this, and no this is not like the crap
Tom Waits puts out.

I can't say that I really like it. 
Taste bad?
did you see that??
Mark is sort of Bruce Cockburn meets Tom Waits.  This has grown on me.  6 ==> 7
Great lyrics. 

I used to wake up every morning saying I must be getting away with something here
Every day was like parole before the levies overflowed; I refuse to think it could all just disappear (I refuse to think)


Is there a long, 5 second dead-air pause after 'think' or was that a network glitch?   :)   Nice either way.


Is this album worth the buy? Considering it's Marc Cohn...I'm guessing yes. But...funds are currently limited.... anyone ?

ValosAtreide wrote:
Man, I dig this tune.. 8. Has a great bluesy feel to it.. more stuff like this on RP! {#Yes}


How about skipping the poseur and going straight for more actual blues?

Dave Alvin called...
Dates beh?  Tastes bah?
 giotto wrote:
Sounds cool, but also a little like a Tom Waits rip-off. {#Evil}
 
Yes it does, but considering the cheesy songs Marc Cohn has done (particularly "True Companion"), this is not too bad.  It is, however, obvious that his choices of subject matter and production techniques were more than inspired by Tom Waits' "Rain Dogs" album.

What a relevant song, love the sound and lyrics are right on. Anybody that loved New Orleans has to mourn the loss of such a great city. Its slowly coming back but don't think it will ever be what it once was,but you will never kill the spirit of the ones that came back and rebuilt and they have a love and generosity that is second to none, thats what really made New Orleans so great was the people.

Sounds cool, but also a little like a Tom Waits rip-off. {#Evil}
Man, I dig this tune.. 8. Has a great bluesy feel to it.. more stuff like this on RP! {#Yes}
 ThePoose wrote:
He's channelling Tom Waits: i.e. Ninth and Hennepin (the rap) meets The Earth Died Screaming (the percussion).
 
Too true, ThePoose.
 flipchurn wrote:
Tastes bad?
 
I was just about to post "Taste back," but "tastes bad" is even better.

And I swear, I'd give this a 7 if he actually sounded like he was singing "Dance back."

 flipchurn wrote:
Tastes bad?
 
Yep

This piece earns its rating from me as it is pure NOLA post-Katrina.  ... I miss that place.  C'est la vie.
 philbertr wrote:


It was a negative event!

No don't shed a tear but take their cue
there's only one thing left to do
in the name of every soul we didn't save
From the ninth ward to the quarter to the Mississippi
Dance back from the grave.


 
I like everything about this song, the trenchant lyrics, the music, the horns, the spoken parts and the singer's obvious anger.  I like the album cover too.

 mwsteele79 wrote:
This is a negative score.
 

It was a negative event!

No don't shed a tear but take their cue
there's only one thing left to do
in the name of every soul we didn't save
From the ninth ward to the quarter to the Mississippi
Dance back from the grave.


tom waits with mick jagger on the chorus?
This is a negative score.
bugleboy624 wrote:
This was a good song until the horn line came in on the end. Mark your calenders, people. This is the first time I've ever downed a song for HAVING a horn section. {#Eek}


As the song is about a Jazz Funeral (A fine way to send off the departed BTW), and said funerals use a horn section to play a dirge on the way to the grave site, then play a jammin' tune to celebrate afterward, I would expect horns to be more prominent than they are.

This was a good song until the horn line came in on the end. Mark your calenders, people. This is the first time I've ever downed a song for HAVING a horn section. {#Eek}
Tastes bad?


He's channelling Tom Waits: i.e. Ninth and Hennepin (the rap) meets The Earth Died Screaming (the percussion).

vit wrote:
Man this is totally unfair, but for some reason I always saw Marc Cohn as some sort of New Orleans poser. No reason ... I just don't believe his authenticity when it comes to that town. I think it's because he's just not badass enough. I just get the feeling that the Dirty Dozen Brass Band would stuff this guy in a tuba then blow him into the gulf. Still, this one gets a ho-hum from me; partially because it was played twice in 24 hours. The playlist is too big for that kind of chicanery.


I don't think he is a 'poser' so much as a 'wanna-be'. Like his 'Walkin' in Memphis': he is not of the town, but loves its spirit, and wants to be as much a part of it as he can. I do not think he pretends to be the real deal: he loves the place and wants to show it.

To use the band you mentioned, I think if he was at a DDBB show he'd be in the front row showin' props to the real men of New Orleans. Plus I think the Dozen would invite him up on the stage to sit in, maybe do this tune for an encore or something.

I'm liking this song more and more, actually. No, of course it's not real New Orleans music, and Mr. Cohn is well aware of it.

Now, Sonny Landreth and his new 'Blue Tarp Blues', that's a different story. Joe Bob says check it out...

c.

 myasma wrote:

yes and yes, sort of. he was shot in the head during an attempted carjacking. the bullet didn't enter his brain. 

he was born in cleveland.  


 

Sorry about the Cleveland bit. (Apologies; I just couldn't resist.)
 lily34 wrote:

is he the one who did that walking in memphis song? didn't he survive brain surgery or some kind of car-jacking or something equally as dramatic?


 
yes and yes, sort of. he was shot in the head during an attempted carjacking. the bullet didn't enter his brain. 

he was born in cleveland.  

The city of New Orleans deserves better than this.
vit wrote:
Man this is totally unfair, but for some reason I always saw Marc Cohn as some sort of New Orleans poser. No reason ... I just don't believe his authenticity when it comes to that town. I think it's because he's just not badass enough. I just get the feeling that the Dirty Dozen Brass Band would stuff this guy in a tuba then blow him into the gulf. Still, this one gets a ho-hum from me; partially because it was played twice in 24 hours. The playlist is too big for that kind of chicanery.
:lol: and :yes: is he the one who did that walking in memphis song? didn't he survive brain surgery or some kind of car-jacking or something equally as dramatic?
:dancingbanana: :jump: :dancingbanana:
This guy sound kinda Mark Knophler
the killer thunderstorm going on outside right now here is the perfect backdrop for this song... :devil_pimp:
SmackDaddy wrote:
You should look up Mason Ruffner
Mason Ruffner is great. It took me some time, but I finally tracked down a copy of Gypsy Blood a year or so ago (I had a cassette of it from way back in the day). A little slick in spots, but an excellent CD... I was thinking Buddy Miller when I heard this song, btw....
DoctorHooey wrote:
Yeah, especially "Earth Died Screaming" from Bone Machine, one of the very best Tom Waits albums
And one of his two Grammy-Award-winning LPs. Deservedly so.
NFG wrote:
Agreed. It all seems a bit self-indulgent and contrived. He's a wannabe. This guy is the Bryan Adams of New Orleans.
You should look up Mason Ruffner
At low volume I thought this was Elvis Costello.
vit wrote:
I just get the feeling that the Dirty Dozen Brass Band would stuff this guy in a tuba then blow him into the gulf.
Now that I'd like to see. DDBB rules. I guess this is a bit of a different style, though, to be fair. Being a staunch NOLA lover, gotta admit I like the imagery.
vit wrote:
Man this is totally unfair, but for some reason I always saw Marc Cohn as some sort of New Orleans poser. No reason ... I just don't believe his authenticity when it comes to that town. I think it's because he's just not badass enough. I just get the feeling that the Dirty Dozen Brass Band would stuff this guy in a tuba then blow him into the gulf. Still, this one gets a ho-hum from me; partially because it was played twice in 24 hours. The playlist is too big for that kind of chicanery.
Agreed. It all seems a bit self-indulgent and contrived. He's a wannabe. This guy is the Bryan Adams of New Orleans.
Something about this song reminded me of a kinder, gentler Tom Waits. Straight to iTunes to buy this one. Through the Radio Paradise link, of course!
he got shot in the head in Denver...That's what you call "dancing back from the grave"!
I'm not sure why I'm embarassed to admit that I dig this song, but there's a weird thing about Marc Cohn. That said, I really do kinda dig this song.
rvhall wrote:
Who elected you Comments monitor? How does the fact that most people voted 7 or 8 invalidate my opinion? How is "boring" a "childish snark"?
Defensive, much? I wasn't actually commenting on your comment, but some of the more virulent trash-talk that has been invading the threads lately. There's opinion, and then there's just being an ass to try to piss off other people you disagree with. If you are entitled to your opinion, well, so am I. Have a nice day!
Man this is totally unfair, but for some reason I always saw Marc Cohn as some sort of New Orleans poser. No reason ... I just don't believe his authenticity when it comes to that town. I think it's because he's just not badass enough. I just get the feeling that the Dirty Dozen Brass Band would stuff this guy in a tuba then blow him into the gulf. Still, this one gets a ho-hum from me; partially because it was played twice in 24 hours. The playlist is too big for that kind of chicanery.
i like the song and all, but it seems to be getting played every 6 hours or so. i'm hearing this A LOT lately.
robco1 wrote:
See how the majority of people voted this a 7 or 8? See how many childish snarks are posted? This is really pissing me off about the comments page. Is this going to be a YouTube-style trash thread, or a place for adults to comment on music and find out info on bands? Make up your minds, folks.
Who elected you Comments monitor? How does the fact that most people voted 7 or 8 invalidate my opinion? How is "boring" a "childish snark"?
lattalo wrote:
Having been to New Orleans since Katrina, this song is well... perfect for what is happening there. I guess I don't understand people who make these kind of stupid comments. Remember there is place on your computer to turn down the volumn if you need to!
See how the majority of people voted this a 7 or 8? See how many childish snarks are posted? This is really pissing me off about the comments page. Is this going to be a YouTube-style trash thread, or a place for adults to comment on music and find out info on bands? Make up your minds, folks.
chism2 wrote:
Boring bullshit.
Okay, it's not bullshit, but it IS boring.
chism2 wrote:
Boring bullshit.
Having been to New Orleans since Katrina, this song is well... perfect for what is happening there. I guess I don't understand people who make these kind of stupid comments. Remember there is place on your computer to turn down the volumn if you need to!
chism2 wrote:
Boring bullshit.
It's a tribute to the lost, for chrissake. Not bullshit at all, but very, very real shit. Still.
chism2 wrote:
Boring bullshit.
While I suppose I could stretch a point and possibly agree that this is boring, I take issue with it being bullshit. Knowing the serious struggles this man has been through and reflecting on his previous, truly inspired work, I see him as incapable of bullshit. :snooty:
Where have all the good tunes gone? Long time passing. Where will the children play? Is someone at RP mad at the world today or what? Didn't the Easter Bunny come to your house either?
Do the Lazarus Boogie! 8.
:dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: :dancingbanana: ps. I love New Orleans!
I do like this one, but I feel I hear it every time I log on these days.
Not much makes me want to go back home, but this does. Good tune.
Boring bullshit.
mandolin wrote:
...regardless of his sources, this is good... ...as went galveston, so followed new orleans, in time...
That time done come. With a vengeance. I like Marc Cohn, but don't love him. His work lacks something, but I can't really put my finger on it. Like 'white boy blues', it's missing a subtle ingredient. Like this song though, my comments notwithstanding. c.
I don't know why, but this song bugs me.
...regardless of his sources, this is good... ...as went galveston, so followed new orleans, in time...
I like Cohn, but when I want Waits...I want the original. That said, I'm thrilled that's he's back recording again!
A tribute to "Weekend at Bernie's"?
steeler wrote:
Sounds like Tom Waits. Except Waits would not have a chorus like that.
Yeah, especially "Earth Died Screaming" from Bone Machine, one of the very best Tom Waits albums
keller1 wrote:
Great tune. The vocals in the verses sound like he's been listening to Tom Waits.
Not very closely.
I am digging this, yes indeed. Marc Cohn is back. :cheers:
Powerful.
...why do you always end up down at nick's cafe?.. ...funny, i'm hearing two different aspects from robbie robertson's early solo work, somewhere down the crazy river and storyville, both...regardless, i like!..
Sounds like Tom Waits. Except Waits would not have a chorus like that.
Marc! You're back! Yeah! :dance:
Great tune. The vocals in the verses sound like he's been listening to Tom Waits.