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Porcupine Tree — Sentimental
Album: Fear Of A Blank Planet
Avg rating:
7.8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3374









Released: 2007
Length: 5:25
Plays (last 30 days): 2
I never wanna be old
And I don't want dependents
It's no fun to be told
That you can't blame your parents anymore

I'm finding it hard to hang from a star
I don't wanna be
Never wanna be old

Sullen and bored the kids stay
And in this way they wish away each day
Stoned in the mall the kids play
And in this way they wish away each day

I don't really know
If I care what is normal
And I'm not really sure
If the pills I've been taking are helping

I'm wasting my life, hurting inside
I don't really know
And I'm not really sure

Sullen and bored the kids stay
And in this way they wish away each day
Stoned in the mall the kids play
And in this way they wish away each day

Sullen and bored the kids stay
And in this way they wish away each day
Stoned in the mall the kids play
And in this way they wish away each day

Sullen and bored the kids stay
And in this way they wish away each day
Stoned in the mall the kids play
And in this way they wish away each day
Comments (718)add comment
Some people never grow up, just older. usually die early. Sad!
Wonderful song,  but too similar to Trains.
Brian Wilson & Steven Wilson....Beach Tree or Porcupine Boys?
Miss Porcupine Tree? Yep. Me too. Steven Wilson feels your pain and so created a Bandcamp page: 

http://stevenwilsonhq.com/sw/porcupine-tree-bandcamp-store-launched/
 MrStatenIsle wrote:
SW is one of the most important artists of our generation.
 
I don't know about that, but I sure like his music.
Anything that SW puts out is 8 or better for me. Amazing artistic energy this guy has.
SW is one of the most important artists of our generation.
 Proclivities wrote:

Why do you care?  Does it have some sort of detrimental or insulting affect on you to know that there are some people who seem to strongly dislike this song or band?  Every song in the playlist has a number of "1" or "2" votes - maybe it can be puzzling sometimes but there are much more pressing things to worry about.
 
Worrying about the 1 and 2 ratings?   Definitely a First world problem. .... 

Unlike... "The Vikings are coming to take your women and arable land!"
 bmccaul wrote:
I'm biased, because of all the new music and artists RP has introduced to me, Porcupine Tree and Steven Wilson are my favorite, but I'm amazed that 44 people could have rated this song a 1 out of 10.

I assume those giving this the lowest rating is from people who dislike PT, and are unhappy that Bill and RP play a lot of PT.  But imagine hearing this song for the first time without any previous knowledge of PT.  Would you really think the song (which admittedly is my favorite of many PT songs I rate 9-10) is Sucko-Barfo?  Worse than 2-Marginal?

Enough of evangelism, since I realize evangelism usually has the opposite of the desired effect.
...
But really?  A 1?  {#Ask} 

 
Don't worry about it too much.  Does it have some sort of detrimental or insulting affect on you to know that there are some people who seem to strongly dislike this song or band?  Every song in the playlist has a number of "1" or "2" votes - maybe it can be puzzling sometimes but there are much more pressing things to worry about.
That album art tho...
 poetdancer wrote:
Steven Wilson is playing the Fillmore in San Francisco on May 11th. We should have an RP contingent there...

 
I'm in - 2 seats - maybe I'll wear my RP swag
 meatmike wrote:
One of the few modern bands you can lose yourself in with headphones on the way you could with the great prog rock bands of the 70's and 80's.
 
One of the few modern bands where it takes some of us 1/2 dozen listens to figure out all the tracks and fully get the objective of the song writer.  
One of the few modern bands you can lose yourself in with headphones on the way you could with the great prog rock bands of the 70's and 80's.
Steven Wilson is playing the Fillmore in San Francisco on May 11th. We should have an RP contingent there...
They were the kings of the 2000's, and this might be their best one.
 dyharenas wrote:
Incredible how in just 10 years the phrase "stoned in the mall the kids play" sounds dated

 
Good to hear.

It ain't dated in this neck of the woods.
Incredible how in just 10 years the phrase "stoned in the mall the kids play" sounds dated
 coloradojohn wrote:
THIS SONG IS AWESOME! from the interesting, "beyond time" percussion (a la Phil Ehart of Kansas; it is well worth checking out, folks!) to the outrageously contemporaneous lyrics, this song is absolutely among the tops in recent years for relevancy and jam-ness!

 
The whole album is awesome.


THIS SONG IS AWESOME! from the interesting, "beyond time" percussion (a la Phil Ehart of Kansas; it is well worth checking out, folks!) to the outrageously contemporaneous lyrics, this song is absolutely among the tops in recent years for relevancy and jam-ness!
 I don't get it either..especially for this station..just thought I'd add my sentiment    bmccaul wrote:
I'm biased, because of all the new music and artists RP has introduced to me, Porcupine Tree and Steven Wilson are my favorite, but I'm amazed that 44 people could have rated this song a 1 out of 10.

I assume those giving this the lowest rating is from people who dislike PT, and are unhappy that Bill and RP play a lot of PT.  But imagine hearing this song for the first time without any previous knowledge of PT.  Would you really think the song (which admittedly is my favorite of many PT songs I rate 9-10) is Sucko-Barfo?  Worse than 2-Marginal?

Enough of evangelism, since I realize evangelism usually has the opposite of the desired effect.
...
But really?  A 1?  {#Ask} 

 

 bmccaul wrote:
I'm biased, because of all the new music and artists RP has introduced to me, Porcupine Tree and Steven Wilson are my favorite, but I'm amazed that 44 people could have rated this song a 1 out of 10.

 
There's no accounting for (bad) taste.
 bmccaul wrote:
I'm biased, because of all the new music and artists RP has introduced to me, Porcupine Tree and Steven Wilson are my favorite, but I'm amazed that 44 people could have rated this song a 1 out of 10.

I assume those giving this the lowest rating is from people who dislike PT, and are unhappy that Bill and RP play a lot of PT.  But imagine hearing this song for the first time without any previous knowledge of PT.  Would you really think the song (which admittedly is my favorite of many PT songs I rate 9-10) is Sucko-Barfo?  Worse than 2-Marginal?

Enough of evangelism, since I realize evangelism usually has the opposite of the desired effect.
...
But really?  A 1?  {#Ask} 

 
Buddy, I'm 100% with you on this.
I'm biased, because of all the new music and artists RP has introduced to me, Porcupine Tree and Steven Wilson are my favorite, but I'm amazed that 44 people could have rated this song a 1 out of 10.

I assume those giving this the lowest rating is from people who dislike PT, and are unhappy that Bill and RP play a lot of PT.  But imagine hearing this song for the first time without any previous knowledge of PT.  Would you really think the song (which admittedly is my favorite of many PT songs I rate 9-10) is Sucko-Barfo?  Worse than 2-Marginal?

Enough of evangelism, since I realize evangelism usually has the opposite of the desired effect.
...
But really?  A 1?  {#Ask} 
 Yes, I bought The Incident, thanks to RP, and I haven't been disappointed.

vanillagorilla wrote:
My new favorite band, the more I listen, the more I hear ...Godlike

 


My new favorite band, the more I listen, the more I hear ...Godlike
 PurplePrincess wrote:
If I could rate this more than a10, I would. Steven Wilson is an under appreciated genius.

 
Absolutely agree! I've seen him twice in Toronto, I'd go again in a second...

This was cool, thanks for sharing.

Limpopoking wrote:

I've never been able to describe my reluctance to join any form of social media this eloquently. I'm saving this to my desktop for forwarding whenever friends berate me for my lack of social exposure. Succinctly put Steven.

 


 DrLex wrote:
This always demands a good cranking of the volume knob.

 
Absolutely!
This always demands a good cranking of the volume knob.
 PurplePrincess wrote:
If I could rate this more than a10, I would. Steven Wilson is an under appreciated genius.

 
I think noone really under-appreciates Steven Wilson ;-)
The guitar-riff at the end is copied closely from "Trains", which was released 5 years before. It doesn't bother me, if the recycling material is that good. Outstanding!
 {#Clap}
westslope wrote:

 

Stephen Humpries (Under the Radar): Tell me why you gravitated toward a contemporary news headline story in Hand.Cannot.Erase.

Steven Wilson: I lived in the city for many years. I never knew my next-door neighbors. I never knew their names, what they did for a living; they didn't know what I did for living or my name. That's typical of what it means to live in the city these days. It is a 21st-century malaise in a way. Maybe it's paranoia, or everybody is too busy. But it also has lots to do with technology and the fact that we increasingly interact with each other through technology.

We have this thing now called social media, which is nothing of the kind. It is, of course, anti-social media, because it encourages people to disconnect from each other. It encourages people to hide behind almost fantasy versions of themselves. There is a version of themselves that they present on Facebook. This is not reality. This is not a real life.

Many friends of mine cannot fathom why I wouldn't want a Facebook account. And the reason is this: It seems like the most impersonal way of conducting relationships. I'd much rather write individual letters—emails—to friends or pick up the phone. On Facebook, everyone carefully curates what they present to friends so that you'd think they were living charmed, trouble-free lives. Or they boast a lot. You never get to know what their lives are really like because it's a public broadcast.

One of the problems with Facebook and social networking is that it encourages everyone to feel like the minutiae of their lives is worthy of publishing for other people to read. And of course, it isn't. I'm sure they have wonderful lives. But they're not particularly interesting for other people. We're not interested in what you had for breakfast, or that you went to the supermarket, or that you're at a party or at a bar with some friends. In a way, it is almost like an Andy Warhol "15 minutes of fame" thing. Everyone now has the opportunity to have the illusion of celebrity. You've published your life online for other people to see.

One of the most unfortunate aspects of the human psyche, ego, the narcissism, is the need to be validated by having your life observed by other people. Of course, that is what reality TV shows tap into. The 21st century, unfortunately has facilitated it through social media and reality television. For me, it's not a particularly positive development.

 



 


If I could rate this more than a10, I would. Steven Wilson is an under appreciated genius.
 westslope wrote:
Last night I stumbled across the best interview with Steven Wilson I have read to date:

Mar 02, 2015 By Stephen Humphries WEB EXCLUSIVE


Pasted excerpt:

Stephen Humpries (Under the Radar): Tell me why you gravitated toward a contemporary news headline story in Hand.Cannot.Erase.

Steven Wilson: I lived in the city for many years. I never knew my next-door neighbors. I never knew their names, what they did for a living; they didn't know what I did for living or my name. That's typical of what it means to live in the city these days. It is a 21st-century malaise in a way. Maybe it's paranoia, or everybody is too busy. But it also has lots to do with technology and the fact that we increasingly interact with each other through technology.

We have this thing now called social media, which is nothing of the kind. It is, of course, anti-social media, because it encourages people to disconnect from each other. It encourages people to hide behind almost fantasy versions of themselves. There is a version of themselves that they present on Facebook. This is not reality. This is not a real life.

Many friends of mine cannot fathom why I wouldn't want a Facebook account. And the reason is this: It seems like the most impersonal way of conducting relationships. I'd much rather write individual letters—emails—to friends or pick up the phone. On Facebook, everyone carefully curates what they present to friends so that you'd think they were living charmed, trouble-free lives. Or they boast a lot. You never get to know what their lives are really like because it's a public broadcast.

One of the problems with Facebook and social networking is that it encourages everyone to feel like the minutiae of their lives is worthy of publishing for other people to read. And of course, it isn't. I'm sure they have wonderful lives. But they're not particularly interesting for other people. We're not interested in what you had for breakfast, or that you went to the supermarket, or that you're at a party or at a bar with some friends. In a way, it is almost like an Andy Warhol "15 minutes of fame" thing. Everyone now has the opportunity to have the illusion of celebrity. You've published your life online for other people to see.

One of the most unfortunate aspects of the human psyche, ego, the narcissism, is the need to be validated by having your life observed by other people. Of course, that is what reality TV shows tap into. The 21st century, unfortunately has facilitated it through social media and reality television. For me, it's not a particularly positive development.

 



 
I've never been able to describe my reluctance to join any form of social media this eloquently. I'm saving this to my desktop for forwarding whenever friends berate me for my lack of social exposure. Succinctly put Steven.
SO MANY BARBECUE STAINS
I saw Steve Wilson at the Beacon NYC on Saturday amazing 3 hour show
An amazing song, a tour de force of musicality, and even if one did not ponder or penetrate the pertinent, timely lyrics, it's sheer poetry!
 westslope wrote:

Double barrel:  60% by weight LSD 25; 40% mescaline.  

Sent a high school band mate into a series of convulsions and very high blood pressure if I recall.  In our defence, everybody advised him not to do it.

Good, clean stuff BTW.  400 mg LSD according to C. Univ. chemist. 

 
Green Barrel, Orange Wedge, White Lightning.  Sandoz manufactured some Lysergic but stopped some time after it was made illegal.
 westslope wrote:
So I have a question for the yanks on the board (and the Canucks who live like yanks).

How much of your kitchen counter space is devoted to drugs, mineral supplements, vitamins and fake food?

———-

200 kg or bust......
 
Well.....I have at least a douzaine anees on you, but I can tell you that my annual travel policy is getting fricken expensive based on the number of prescriptions I am obliged to take. There comes a time when you beg your Doc to NOT give you any more scripts because the actual cost is worse than the benefit. As for the counter space, real estate is so expensive that I keep the pill bottles over the fridge where they may be hard to reach, but don't occupy that thousand dollar square foot on the counter.
 westslope wrote:

Well, as long as you are not hangin' out in the mall blotto most of the time, you should be just fine!

My wife still calls me 'Peter Pan' though I am about to push through the magical 60 threshold in a couple of months.  To be immodest, I reckon I look pretty good compared to many of the fellow citizens in their 30s and 40s.  

It is sad that middle-aged North American white males are facing declining life expectancies these days.  

 
I & a few like-minded mates have a theory that a 'mid-life crisis' only happens to those who forgot how to be a kid, and it happens when they suddenly remember. My advice to any 'young-uns' - keep your motorcycle, keep your original jeans (don't let her find them) and don't believe any of that 'when i became a man' bull-hype. Be yourself, and never allow yourself to become what you think the world expects you to be, and with luck & a following wind, you'll never end up like 'them'. What do you reckon?
 springof63 wrote:

I was born in the spring of '63.
Not planning on growing up any time soon . . .
{#Smile}

 
Well, as long as you are not hangin' out in the mall blotto most of the time, you should be just fine!

My wife still calls me 'Peter Pan' though I am about to push through the magical 60 threshold in a couple of months.  To be immodest, I reckon I look pretty good compared to many of the fellow citizens in their 30s and 40s.  

It is sad that middle-aged North American white males are facing declining life expectancies these days.  
 xnavy wrote:


I grew up in the late 60's - Orange Sunshine was our hallucinogen choice

 
I was born in the spring of '63.
Not planning on growing up any time soon . . .
{#Smile}
Last night I stumbled across the best interview with Steven Wilson I have read to date:

Mar 02, 2015 By Stephen Humphries WEB EXCLUSIVE


Pasted excerpt:

Stephen Humpries (Under the Radar): Tell me why you gravitated toward a contemporary news headline story in Hand.Cannot.Erase.

Steven Wilson: I lived in the city for many years. I never knew my next-door neighbors. I never knew their names, what they did for a living; they didn't know what I did for living or my name. That's typical of what it means to live in the city these days. It is a 21st-century malaise in a way. Maybe it's paranoia, or everybody is too busy. But it also has lots to do with technology and the fact that we increasingly interact with each other through technology.

We have this thing now called social media, which is nothing of the kind. It is, of course, anti-social media, because it encourages people to disconnect from each other. It encourages people to hide behind almost fantasy versions of themselves. There is a version of themselves that they present on Facebook. This is not reality. This is not a real life.

Many friends of mine cannot fathom why I wouldn't want a Facebook account. And the reason is this: It seems like the most impersonal way of conducting relationships. I'd much rather write individual letters—emails—to friends or pick up the phone. On Facebook, everyone carefully curates what they present to friends so that you'd think they were living charmed, trouble-free lives. Or they boast a lot. You never get to know what their lives are really like because it's a public broadcast.

One of the problems with Facebook and social networking is that it encourages everyone to feel like the minutiae of their lives is worthy of publishing for other people to read. And of course, it isn't. I'm sure they have wonderful lives. But they're not particularly interesting for other people. We're not interested in what you had for breakfast, or that you went to the supermarket, or that you're at a party or at a bar with some friends. In a way, it is almost like an Andy Warhol "15 minutes of fame" thing. Everyone now has the opportunity to have the illusion of celebrity. You've published your life online for other people to see.

One of the most unfortunate aspects of the human psyche, ego, the narcissism, is the need to be validated by having your life observed by other people. Of course, that is what reality TV shows tap into. The 21st century, unfortunately has facilitated it through social media and reality television. For me, it's not a particularly positive development.

 


smooth, with a capital SMOOO. ;-)
Hands down my favorite new, prog rock band. Thank you RP for turning me on to these guys, all the way back in 2002.

Also, saw them at the Orange Peel in Asheville and they played the track. Absolutely mind blowing! 
Musically, beautiful
Lyrically, extremely sad
Selfish selfie {#Meditate} 
 xnavy wrote:


I grew up in the late 60's - Orange Sunshine was our hallucinogen choice

 
Double barrel:  60% by weight LSD 25; 40% mescaline.  

Sent a high school band mate into a series of convulsions and very high blood pressure if I recall.  In our defence, everybody advised him not to do it.

Good, clean stuff BTW.  400 mg LSD according to C. Univ. chemist. 
 westslope wrote:

Never developed a fondness for mushrooms.  Cactus and I got a long much better.

As for cocaine, if people would only gently suck the coca leaves or at worst chomp down on the leaves and simply leave all the other derivatives alone, there would be a lot less misery.

 

 

I grew up in the late 60's - Orange Sunshine was our hallucinogen choice
I have some great news to share!

In Greater Vancouver, there have been a dozen public shooting incidents over the past few weeks.  Exciting eh?

And only one person died.

These were apparently low-level drug turf wars.  What kind of drugs?  The police and newspapers do not say.  "Drugs" is usually sufficient to sow fear and guarantee massive police budgets.

People in British Columbia do love their black markets but then this round of violence is also driven by questionable immigration policies.  The perpetrators are young Somalian and Indo-Canadian gang bangers.  

I think Canadians have always been hugely jealous of inner city violence in the USA and now we have it!  Joyous day. 
 Tippster wrote:

Hell I grew up in the late 70's and early/mid 80's and it was still like that (you forgot Psilocybin {#Tongue-out} )  The only drugs you took to shut yourself down were Alcohol, Quaaludes, and Pot - you know: Depressants.

Then Cocaine got us all jumpy and electricky.  Glad I got over that right quick.

 
Never developed a fondness for mushrooms.  Cactus and I got a long much better.

As for cocaine, if people would only gently suck the coca leaves or at worst chomp down on the leaves and simply leave all the other derivatives alone, there would be a lot less misery.

 
 westslope wrote:
This gets back to loftier and perhaps more naive aspirations of the 'movement' back in the day.  Drugs popular with the counter-culture were supposed to enlighten, not smother.   Mind altering substances were supposed to feed creativity not kill it.  

Back then, LSD, mescaline, peyote, San Pedro, MDA, MDMA and others were supposed to open up new worlds, not became regular weekend party drugs.

 

 
Hell I grew up in the late 70's and early/mid 80's and it was still like that (you forgot Psilocybin {#Tongue-out} )  The only drugs you took to shut yourself down were Alcohol, Quaaludes, and Pot - you know: Depressants.

Then Cocaine got us all jumpy and electricky.  Glad I got over that right quick.
 pollyh wrote:

couldn't have said it better myself. nods head in response to "I sometimes wonder if Steven Wilson understands the '60s better than most who actually lived through that period." 

 
Perfectly fine tune for a damp west coast afternoon.
 westslope wrote:

Most of us love Steven Wilson precisely because he takes the music very seriously.  Extremely seriously.  We love him because of the way he respects the old masters.  

As for his insights into the anguish-ridden adolescent mind, I agree totally.  Is there a contemporary rock poet alive that comes that close to getting it?  

I sometimes wonder if Steven Wilson understands the '60s better than most who actually lived through that period.  If you listen carefully to Wilson's lyrics, other than tobacco perhaps, he is simply not interested in self-medication.  There is a very clear anti-blotto self-medication message if you care to listen on his CDs that predated Fear of a Blank Planet.

This gets back to loftier and perhaps more naive aspirations of the 'movement' back in the day.  Drugs popular with the counter-culture were supposed to enlighten, not smother.   Mind altering substances were supposed to feed creativity not kill it.  

Back then, LSD, mescaline, peyote, San Pedro, MDA, MDMA and others were supposed to open up new worlds, not became regular weekend party drugs.

 

 
couldn't have said it better myself. nods head in response to "I sometimes wonder if Steven Wilson understands the '60s better than most who actually lived through that period." 
Oh yeah dang that's good..{#Cheers}
 For me...the best one !! Piranga wrote:
One of the great bands revealed by RP. Thanks a million!

 


I have to see Gavin Harrison playing this, because as I listen, I can't imagine how he does it, especially the closing high hat amid everything else. Amazing. I have to admit I hadn't paid much attention to him until I read all the paeans here on RP's comments. One special drummer.

Where have these "GUYS" been all these years on normal radio airplay?

Oh! normal regular same old songs!  Ya that's it...too bad!


Is there a low frequency rumbling at the start of this piece, or did we just have a little tremor (South Carolina)?

edit: we had a 2.2
One of the great bands revealed by RP. Thanks a million!
I'm not at RP often, but this last set of songs reminds me of why it's so amazing!  Barr Brothers, Moby, Loreena McKennitt and now, my beloved Porcupine Tree.  Thanks Bill, for the excellent programming!
So I have a question for the yanks on the board (and the Canucks who live like yanks).

How much of your kitchen counter space is devoted to drugs, mineral supplements, vitamins and fake food?

-------

200 kg or bust......





Really tempting to say this is only nice tunes, but it's more than that. How much more, my jury is still out.
 fredriley wrote:

At times, but not on this album, IMO, which is about teenage angst. The lyrics sound like an adolescent boy's diary, and indeed may have been taken from one such. I think it brilliantly captures the nihilism and depression of some adolescent minds, including mine when I was that age - it's an embarrassment to read my diary from those days. I forever give thanks to RP for introducing me to PT (as well as hundreds of other brilliant artists) {#Notworthy}

 
Most of us love Steven Wilson precisely because he takes the music very seriously.  Extremely seriously.  We love him because of the way he respects the old masters.  

As for his insights into the anguish-ridden adolescent mind, I agree totally.  Is there a contemporary rock poet alive that comes that close to getting it?  

I sometimes wonder if Steven Wilson understands the '60s better than most who actually lived through that period.  If you listen carefully to Wilson's lyrics, other than tobacco perhaps, he is simply not interested in self-medication.  There is a very clear anti-blotto self-medication message if you care to listen on his CDs that predated Fear of a Blank Planet.

This gets back to loftier and perhaps more naive aspirations of the 'movement' back in the day.  Drugs popular with the counter-culture were supposed to enlighten, not smother.   Mind altering substances were supposed to feed creativity not kill it.  

Back then, LSD, mescaline, peyote, San Pedro, MDA, MDMA and others were supposed to open up new worlds, not became regular weekend party drugs.

 
 stunix wrote:
Few people can deny that Steven Wilsons music is a little pretentious at times, I guess it is just part of rock music taking itself way too seriously and it should be taken with a pinch of salt.  I like the production on this one thou.

 
At times, but not on this album, IMO, which is about teenage angst. The lyrics sound like an adolescent boy's diary, and indeed may have been taken from one such. I think it brilliantly captures the nihilism and depression of some adolescent minds, including mine when I was that age - it's an embarrassment to read my diary from those days. I forever give thanks to RP for introducing me to PT (as well as hundreds of other brilliant artists) {#Notworthy}
gone up a notch now - a purposeful sound

                       {#Cool}
 ccwcool wrote:
Awesome.

 
..... most defiantly 
 westslope wrote:

I adore Luminol.  My wife hates it. => Don't think it would work on RP.

 
We may never know.{#Eek}

 Interesting how we remember what was playing when tragedy struck.  I was in a really bad car accident back in 1983.  Golden earring, When the bullet hits the bone will forever grace that memory.  stevesaw wrote:
Had this on when my car was totaled by a drunk driver. Made sure the insurance bought me a new CD.

 





Awesome.
 jgriffin56 wrote:
 Drive Home would fit in nicely imho.  As would Luminol. 

 
I adore Luminol.  My wife hates it. => Don't think it would work on RP.
 {#Drummer} {#Music} {#Angel} 
 
westslope wrote:

Hear! Hear! Hear!  (Close your eyes and you can imagine that I am pounding the table. :-)

 

Drive home would work on RP me thinks...... 



  Drive Home would fit in nicely imho.  As would Luminol. 
 jgriffin56 wrote:
S. Wilson continues to create excellent work with his solo effort.  I highly recommend The Raven that Refused to Sing, maybe we might even hear some of it here (Hint, Hint).   

 

Hear! Hear! Hear!  (Close your eyes and you can imagine that I am pounding the table. :-)

 

Drive home would work on RP me thinks...... 


did you notice the drummer? amazing work by Gavin Harrison


"stoned in the mal the kids play"
S. Wilson continues to create excellent work with his solo effort.  I highly recommend The Raven that Refused to Sing, maybe we might even hear some of it here (Hint, Hint).   

Terrific set.  

 

So what is Steven Wilson doing next?  Another solo CD with his current band?  Back to Porcupine Tree?  A Zen Buddhist retreat?  Children?


Anything that makes you think is commendable...because then you must process the information...and then you're accountable for that knowledge instantly.
 stevesaw wrote:
Had this on when my car was totaled by a drunk driver. Made sure the insurance bought me a new CD.

 

Good priorities!
The truth is...who are we being true, too?
Had this on when my car was totaled by a drunk driver. Made sure the insurance bought me a new CD.
 stunix wrote:
Few people can deny that Steven Wilsons music is a little pretentious at times, I guess it is just part of rock music taking itself way too seriously and it should be taken with a pinch of salt.  I like the production on this one thou.

 
Happy to be one of those few people - and if everything was taken with a pinch of salt nothing of any value would get done. 

I'm convinced Steven Wilson is a genius.
He's such an agony aunt but I love his music so much.

Steve, your music is awesome mate!
Good music to accompany work.
 msymmes wrote:
Sounds like Space Oddity

 
No it does not....
Few people can deny that Steven Wilsons music is a little pretentious at times, I guess it is just part of rock music taking itself way too seriously and it should be taken with a pinch of salt.  I like the production on this one thou.
This song and 'My Ashes' are my favourite songs of PT. I remember, I was driving home in 2007 and hearing 'Sentimental' on the radio. Since then, I love it.
Awesome, thanks for playing!
Sounds like Space Oddity
I've never heard a song by PT that I didn't like. Ten...no arguement.
I just increased my score to 10 because PT is Godlike. Steven Wilson's solo album "Grace for Drowning" is also Godlike. If you are a PT fan and haven't yet heard it, make an effort to give it a listen.
WowWoes are they not one of the best bands I recent years!
Steve is very good and Gavin, well....great all around drums 
Thanks, Bill !
Thanks for introducing me to one of my top 5 favorites bands.
Gavin and Steven... {#Clap}
?
6/30/2013 Live interview with Julian Assange on ABC:  GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS:  Let me bring this back to Julian Assange.  Back in 2010, an email that was revealed from you by Bart Gellman in "Time" magazine, said that you hoped the revelations from Wikileaks would bring about, quote, "the total annihilation of the current U.S. regime."  Is that still your goal, and what did you mean by that?

https://abcnews.go.com/ThisWeek/week-transcript-wikileaks-julian-assange/story?id=19521380&page=5#.UdC0-WzD8fQ
 Webfoot wrote:
Excellent set Bill!  Time to contribute.

 
Good call.  Amazingly great day of music today.  Time for a contribution.
 winotron wrote:
The lack of subtlety in the lyrics in this song, and the rest of this album, kind of bothers me.  Still a fan of the album, but sometimes I try not to listen to the lyrics too hard with this band.  Obviously amazingly talented musicians otherwise.

 
The album songs are told from the perspective of a troubled adolescent, and subtlety often isn't a characteristic of hormone-addled confused teens. They remind me of me when I was a teen, wrestling with adolescent angst and whatnot.
After listening to most every piece of work done by PT, I'd put this album (album?) at the top of the list.

Everything just seems to come together
 Krispian wrote:

Me toooooooooo!
 
Very fitting on a sunny spring day in YVR!
 clwguy wrote:
fuck, i love Porcupine Tree

 
Me toooooooooo!
 eve_silver wrote:

I third the opinion on PT, would keep Florence as well and kick out Neko Case instead  {#Nyah}

 
Whoever you are, come show me your record collection. {#Hug}
Incredible 
horrible
Timeless and with every hearing a transcendental journey begins. {#Good-vibes}
The lack of subtlety in the lyrics in this song, and the rest of this album, kind of bothers me.  Still a fan of the album, but sometimes I try not to listen to the lyrics too hard with this band.  Obviously amazingly talented musicians otherwise.
 Tylersmyler wrote:
"So many barbeque stains.." {#Bananajam}
 

Ha! That lightens the mood of that song.
One of the PT songs that always fits in well ... at home, at work or very loud in the car.
fuck, i love Porcupine Tree
Excellent set Bill!  Time to contribute.
This is too fucking good!
Cadence and time signature alone is worth high rating...but then fixing it up with excellent harmonies and musicianship...then you got an amazing tune.
 roborob wrote:
But why "sentimental"?  Love the tune; brooding was the word someone used.  But I can't make the connection from either the melody or the lyric to the notion of sentimentality.   I enjoy it very much, nevertheless.
 
I believe this song is about pining for the past. A lost childhood innocence if you will. Something we are all sentimental about to a certain degree...

Gawd! I remember watching these guys open for Opeth! (Portland, Oregon) 

That was definately a show that blew your hair back!

Woot! 
For an alternate adult reality, I invite you to see the US television drama:  Sons of Anarchy.  

 


Is caring about others' children an exercise in sentimentality? 

Isn't pining for alert, creative and active children an exercise in sentimentality?

 

Besides, it sounds nicer than let's say.... Aesthetics.  


But why "sentimental"?  Love the tune; brooding was the word someone used.  But I can't make the connection from either the melody or the lyric to the notion of sentimentality.   I enjoy it very much, nevertheless.
 Blastcat900 wrote:
Best cover ever, best band, best album... I even like this lame song... do you think I'm a fan? I give it a ten for the cover alone. Well, 9.
 
I think it's possible that you haven't seen very many album covers if you think that is the "best cover ever".  Well, it's all a matter of personal taste anyhow.  Quite a good tune, at any rate.
I hope to god that RP streams to wherever I go when I die
 logic wrote:

Second the opinion on Porcupine Tree... but keep Florence on the soundtrack too! {#Dance}
 
I third the opinion on PT, would keep Florence as well and kick out Neko Case instead  {#Nyah}
"Stoned in the mall the kids play and in this way wish away each day." Is a profound observation and a great line for a song.
Must be the mood of a gray rainy evocative day here in NYC. I just bumped this to a 9. Too high for this? No, PT has always cared about its music, no slackers them, in this case they get a lot of song out of a little music.