[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]
The Rolling Stones — Lady Jane
Album: Aftermath
Avg rating:
6.8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 471









Released: 1966
Length: 3:09
Plays (last 30 days): 0
My sweet Lady Jane
When I see you again
Your servant am I
And will humbly remain
Just heed this plea my love
On bended knees my love
I pledge myself to Lady Jane
My dear Lady Anne
I've done what I can
I must take my leave
For promised I am
This play is run my love
Your time has come my love
I've pledged my troth to Lady Jane
Oh my sweet Marie
I wait at your ease
The sands have run out
For your lady and me
Wedlock is nigh my love
Her station's right my love
Life is secure with Lady Jane
Comments (77)add comment
 ttburger3 wrote:
the Rolling Stones were a lot better when they were young.  where they got the concept for this song is beyond me, but I love the melody, the simple arrangement and the fact that Mick Jagger's voice actually sounds good.
 . . . . and I've never even been to a renaissance fair 

 
I've heard this song many times and was just thinking the same sort of thing: why put this out? It's supposed to hearken back to courtly songs of romance but it's fairly clunky in its rhyming. Wikipedia indicates it was Brian Jones' attempt to broaden the Stones' styles and "musical textures and the band's attempt at baroque rock. 
 laozilover wrote:
The weirdest thing! Just now the song stopped and restarted a few seconds back to the higher volume I don't think this is right.

 
Yes, me too. Bad file? 
The weirdest thing! Just now the song stopped and restarted a few seconds back to the higher volume I don't think this is right.
I do like this, but it sure sounds like it's from a different lifetime.
 msymmes wrote:
So agree...
 

Canlistener wrote:
I always thought the Stones were awful, after hearing this I am very comfortable with my decision.

 

 
You obviously have no  taste at all.....go listen to Ronnie James Dio or something.
So agree...
 

Canlistener wrote:
I always thought the Stones were awful, after hearing this I am very comfortable with my decision.

 


Almost 50 freakin' years ago! Dayam!
Flashbacks of college days-love the nostalgia, and still a great song and album.
Spinal Tap failed at this genre.
so very cool
 Shimmer wrote:
POSEURS!
 
I guess they were as much "poseurs" as the guys depicted below were "tools"...
Beatles Cartoons
...then again, all rock/pop stars are poseurs or tools to some extent, anyhow.


the Rolling Stones were a lot better when they were young.  where they got the concept for this song is beyond me, but I love the melody, the simple arrangement and the fact that Mick Jagger's voice actually sounds good.
 . . . . and I've never even been to a renaissance fair 
A classic that is not played enough!
 tommyfly wrote:

Guess what paulmack? Lay off the guy. He's just stating an opinion.
 

Indeed.  Some people take it far too personally.
I always thought the Stones were awful, after hearing this I am very comfortable with my decision.
Up next - Neil Young, Borrowed Tune??
 k_trout wrote:
really hard to dance to
 
maybe try twirling around in a circle with some scarves in hand..........  {#Wink}
 paulmack wrote:

Guess what? I don't agree. Being as self-centered as you, I declare myself right, therefore you are wrong. How about that? Of course, I'm not that self-centered and I don't really care whether you like the song or not, doesn't affect my enjoyment of it anyway. But I still have a healthy dislike for intolerance. There are times when such an attitude blocks progress. I also hear that it's habit-forming.

 
Guess what paulmack? Lay off the guy. He's just stating an opinion.


 lsfeder wrote:
Definitely not their best effort....
 
Guess what? I don't agree. Being as self-centered as you, I declare myself right, therefore you are wrong. How about that? Of course, I'm not that self-centered and I don't really care whether you like the song or not, doesn't affect my enjoyment of it anyway. But I still have a healthy dislike for intolerance. There are times when such an attitude blocks progress. I also hear that it's habit-forming.

Definitely not their best effort....
Love this LP ! All of it.
Yeah, Borrowed Tune has a lot more heart and soul than this number from The World's Greatest Rock and Roll Band (TM).
 lemmoth wrote:
I'm singing this borrowed tune
I took from the Rolling Stones
 
Nice reference, lemmoth. I'll take Neil's tune over this misguided cheese any day.

POSEURS!
really hard to dance to
Back when this album came out, Lady Jane, or just Jane, was slang for pot, grass, weed...... 

 
spanzo wrote:
Also 'Lady Jane' was slang for female genitalia - as in one of DH Lawrence's dirty books "John Thomas and Lady Jane", which was an early version of Lady Chatterley's Lover which had been decensored a few years before this album came out
 
ScopArch wrote:

Lady Jane = Jane Boleyn sister-in law-of Anne Boleyn Lady Anne = Anne Boleyn, Janes sister and Henry the VIII's 2nd of six wives Lady Mary = Mary Boleyn, Annes half sister, and Mistress of Henry VIII There's a story here somewhere.....
">(click here)

Proof once again of Jaggers penchant for English history It's good be King
 

 

Perfect tune... when you're wearing your puffy shirt.
 Geecheeboy wrote:
Frankly a little goofy.
 
had to scroll halfway down the page to find you and i'm with you - literally laughable. glad everyone else seems to get a kick out of it
The best song on the LP for me. I used to really like the Rotary Connections version of this song. Haven't heard that one in a long while...
Also 'Lady Jane' was slang for female genitalia - as in one of DH Lawrence's dirty books "John Thomas and Lady Jane", which was an early version of Lady Chatterley's Lover which had been decensored a few years before this album came out
 
ScopArch wrote:

Lady Jane = Jane Boleyn sister-in law-of Anne Boleyn Lady Anne = Anne Boleyn, Janes sister and Henry the VIII's 2nd of six wives Lady Mary = Mary Boleyn, Annes half sister, and Mistress of Henry VIII There's a story here somewhere.....
">(click here)

Proof once again of Jaggers penchant for English history It's good be King
 

 romeotuma wrote:


This song is soooo good for the ears...
 
indeed.

Not the best song from that album but still pretty good.  And, it did sound quite different from most rock at the time.  Plus, it showed a softer side to the Stones.


This song is soooo good for the ears...


wonderful tune.
It's a shame that dulcimer-tuning technology didn't really take off until the 1970s.

Ya know, I really hate this song, but yet I find myself singing along with it every damn time.  There must be three brain cells buried in there that enjoy this for some odd reason. 

Plus, my sister and I used to refer to each other as "Lady Jane," as in "You're not so smart, Lady Jane!"  So there's that too.


 Geecheeboy wrote:
Frankly a little goofy.
 
Tis true, my Lord.
Frankly a little goofy.
Not Good.
{#Puke}
I can't listen to this without laughing.  The Stones doing Baroque chamber music.  Kinda seems cheesy like a Tenacious D song.  It was probably novel when they recorded it I imagine.
I'm singing this borrowed tune
I took from the Rolling Stones
nigelr wrote:

Indeed.
Perhaps an early reference to Ms Faithful?
Henry VIII was a Tudor composer of some note, and a great fan and promoter of music and the arts.
He also had some rather strange ideas on matrimony...........


My father was married five times and my mother three. I think Henry's ideas on matrimony were pretty run-of-the-mill. Except for, you know, the decapitation thing.




I remember this well...  this is a great song...


 junebaby65 wrote:
Man, there is some really great Brian Jones era Stones material that is rarely played...This is one of them. Thanks!
 
Indeed.
Perhaps an early reference to Ms Faithful?
Henry VIII was a Tudor composer of some note, and a great fan and promoter of music and the arts.
He also had some rather strange ideas on matrimony........... 

stewliscious wrote:
Love the Stones... but this is not only one of the wussiest Stones songs but possibly one of the most wuss-like songs of all time. Mick trying desperately to get laid by royalty.

{#Roflol}  You're right... it is the wussiest song!

Love the Stones... but this is not only one of the wussiest Stones songs but possibly one of the most wuss-like songs of all time.  Mick trying desperately to get laid by royalty.
fredriley wrote:

That's a good starting hypothesis, but where does Marie come into this scheme? I can't remember Henry VIII marrying a Marie...



I was taking into consideration that the pronunciation of Mary's name as "Marie" was Jagger's artistic license in applying iambic pentameter.

Since I have posted this I have not been able to find corroborating evidence to this theory. Jagger allegedly said himself that : "Lady Jane is a complete sort of very weird song. I don't really know what that's all about myself. All the names are historical but it was really unconscious that they should fit together from the same period."

I give up

Great song though...


ScopArch wrote:
Lady Jane = Jane Boleyn sister-in law-of Anne Boleyn Lady Anne = Anne Boleyn, Janes sister and Henry the VIII's 2nd of six wives Lady Mary = Mary Boleyn, Annes half sister, and Mistress of Henry VIII There's a story here somewhere..... ">(click here) Proof once again of Jaggers penchant for English history It's good be King
That's a good starting hypothesis, but where does Marie come into this scheme? I can't remember Henry VIII marrying a Marie...
Lady Jane = Jane Boleyn sister-in law-of Anne Boleyn Lady Anne = Anne Boleyn, Janes sister and Henry the VIII's 2nd of six wives Lady Mary = Mary Boleyn, Annes half sister, and Mistress of Henry VIII There's a story here somewhere..... ">(click here) Proof once again of Jaggers penchant for English history It's good be King
bam23 wrote:
As soon as this came on tonight I realized how really sophisticated a composition it is. For the time and what was expected of a musical group, this was unusual. Still sounds pretty good, doesn't it?
Yes it does. Not sure it was THAT unusual, though. A LOT of good music came out of that time.
RationalB wrote:
IMGoph wrote:
ok, what came first, this song, or cat stevens' lady d'arbanville....because someone ripped off someone here
RationalB: for flaming someone for not using the mighty power of the Internet, and then not being able to put said flame outside the Quote space, and not editing the offending post where such facilities exist: You fail at the Internets.
As soon as this came on tonight I realized how really sophisticated a composition it is. For the time and what was expected of a musical group, this was unusual. Still sounds pretty good, doesn't it?
RationalB wrote:
IMGoph wrote:
ok, what came first, this song, or cat stevens' lady d'arbanville....because someone ripped off someone here Stones 1966 Cat 1970
Okay Bill - now play Neil Young's Borrowed Tune from Tonights the Night!!!!!!!
IMGoph wrote:
ok, what came first, this song, or cat stevens' lady d'arbanville....because someone ripped off someone herePosted 12 years ago by RationalB    [ Reply ]
good ole Stones - still great after all this time.
Johray63 wrote:
Neil Young deliberately copies it in Borrowed Tune: I'm singin' this borrowed tune I took from the Rolling Stones, Alone in this empty room Too wasted to write my own.
Cool obscure Neil trivia. :yes:
Sad to say, but this is the first time I've ever heard this song (and I'm old enough to have grown up with the Stones.) Beautiful. Thanks again, RP.
My favorite Stones era
DaveInVA wrote:
Great song, haven't heard it in years. I also used to like The Rotary Connections version of this song way back when..


There's a name I haven't heard for a while. I was beginning to think maybe I was the only one left alive who remembers Rotary Connection.

Mick's voice really doesn't fit this song, but I still like it.  Some.

Great song, haven't heard it in years. I also used to like The Rotary Connections version of this song way back when..
Tops in my book!
It doesn't get any sweeter than this.
Neil Young deliberately copies it in Borrowed Tune: I'm singin' this borrowed tune I took from the Rolling Stones, Alone in this empty room Too wasted to write my own. The Stones' most experimental and maybe creative period was probably when Brian was still in charge.
IMGoph wrote:
ok, what came first, this song, or cat stevens' lady d'arbanville....because someone ripped off someone here
So this is where Dylan got the idea for Lay, Lady, Lay. ...Or not.
tapatia wrote:
My dad told me that back when this album first came out, "Lady Jane" was a reference to gay sex - an indulgence for which Mick Jagger was known, at least in later years. If that's true, then I doubt that this song had any direct connection to the one by Cat Stevens.
More likely to be a reference to Jane Asher, or Jane Seymour (not Henry V's) than queer.
Not my fave song by them (and man, they had some bad album covers). If I'm not mistaken this is the tune Neil Young "borrowed" when wrote "Borrowed Tune."
junebaby65 wrote:
Man, there is some really great Brian Jones era Stones material that is rarely played...This is one of them. Thanks!
Very true.
That's just silly. If both lyrics didn't contain "Lady" you would never connect them. Two totally different melodies. Probably 99% of the song comparisons here on RP are this sort of nonsense dreck. IMGoph wrote:
ok, what came first, this song, or cat stevens' lady d'arbanville....because someone ripped off someone here
Wow! What a nostalgy! It immediately changed my mood positively...
well, certainly there isn't a match as far as song content goes. i was referring to the music. they just sound the same. tapatia wrote:
My dad told me that back when this album first came out, "Lady Jane" was a reference to gay sex - an indulgence for which Mick Jagger was well-known, at least in later years. If that's true, then I doubt that this song had any direct connection to the one by Cat Stevens.
bronorb wrote:
Good observation. The two songs are very similar. I would guess that Lady Jane was first.
My dad told me that back when this album first came out, "Lady Jane" was a reference to gay sex - an indulgence for which Mick Jagger was known, at least in later years. If that's true, then I doubt that this song had any direct connection to the one by Cat Stevens.
IMGoph wrote:
ok, what came first, this song, or cat stevens' lady d'arbanville....because someone ripped off someone here
Good observation. The two songs are very similar. I would guess that Lady Jane was first.
Good song. Back in the days when the Stones brought something new to the table.
ok, what came first, this song, or cat stevens' lady d'arbanville....because someone ripped off someone here
Man, there is some really great Brian Jones era Stones material that is rarely played...This is one of them. Thanks!