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Ramones — Do You Remember Rock N Roll Radio
Album: End Of The Century
Avg rating:
6.7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1333









Released: 1980
Length: 3:49
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Do you remember Hullabaloo,
Upbeat, Shindig and Ed Sullivan too?
Do you remember rock'n'roll radio?
Do you remember rock'n'roll radio?

Do you remember Murray the K,
Alan Freed, and high energy?
It's the end, the end of the 70's
It's the end, the end of the century

Do you remember lying in bed
With your covers pulled up over your head?
Radio playin' so one can see
We need change, we need it fast
Before rock's just part of the past
'Cause lately it all sounds the same to me

Oh-oh
Will you remember Jerry Lee, John Lennon, T. Rex and Ol' Moulty?
It's the end, the end of the 70's
It's the end, the end of the century
Comments (177)add comment
Phil Spector almost ruined this album. Wall Of Sound it did not need...
 WonderLizard wrote:
This is why the Ramones mattered and still do.
 
No. The Ramones mattered but this song isn't why.
Der schlechteste Ramones Song?
I learned through my college radio tenure (KGLT Bozeman!) that the intro and outro this song is  FM free format radio pioneer Tom Donahue of KSAN fame.. his son Sean (RIP) carried on the legacy and graced the Bozeman MT airwaves in the 90s and early 2000s.
HA, Ha, HA, HA, Ha!

Do you remember rock and roll radio ... while you're listening to the internet?  (Yes, I do, but the fidelity is much better here.)
Mmmmmmm Ramones cheese!
   
              
11  !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 jrozzelle wrote:
I don't know how the Spotify-Pandora algorithms work but I'd bet anything that now matter what your input preferences you'd never hear this set sequence: Thievery Corporation, Duke Ellington, Ramones, Elvis Costello.  Radio Radio indeed.

 
That's what's kept me glued to RP all these years... :-)
{#Jump}
 because there isn't a moshing smiley face....
My first concert - Ramones and The Forgotten Rebels 1980 in Burlington, Ontario, of all places.
Image result for ramones rock and roll radio gif
 Propayne wrote:

Well, I will honestly try to answer this -

I was born in 1960, and there was always a lot of music being played around my house. Early Beatles, the Monkees, The Beach Boys, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Dick Dale, the Astronauts, the Byrds, Bob Dylan.

I grew and things got more mature - Blue Cheer, the MC5, Hendrix, Zeppelin, King Crimson.

I loved, and still love Psychedelic/Art/Progressive Rock and Jazz Fusion.

But a lot of those bands did start to disappear up their own asses and then I heard Iggy and the Stooges, The Ramones, The Sex Pistols and X.

In X I heard the folk and country music roots - Johnny and June Carter Cash.

In the Ramones I immediately heard the surf and garage rock I loved as a kid. They brought the fun and sense of humor back. The feeling of just grab and instrument and jump up on stage and play.

It's often said that Punk killed Prog - but for me a better description would be that bands like The Ramones kind of hit the reset button on Rock and Roll at a time when that was really needed. It was such a breath of fresh air. Unpretentious and stripped back again to it's essentials - back to it's roots and to what made the music so great in the first place. The timing was perfect. Maybe that is a part of appreciating The Ramones.

Psych morphed into Art morphed into Prog morphed into Glam and Glam kinda split off into Punk and New Wave.

Bands like Pink Floyd and King Crimson put out some of their best and most successful music right at the height of Punk - and progressive (maybe Art Rock would be a better description) kind of hid in bands like XTC, Television, The Talking Heads, Ultravox - and bands like The Damned and Husker Du still did 17 minute songs and double albums. Great stuff.

Anyway, that's my take on it...
 

  Best comment ever.


Silly, almost stupid — and smoking hot fun. The Shirelles had sex with The Sex Pistols. Killing it, guys. 
Was Phil waiving his piece (gun, not hair) when they recorded this one?
Duke Ellington to the Ramones.... only here at Radio Paradise !   Thank you Bill & Rebecca !
 Propayne wrote:

Well, I will honestly try to answer this -

I was born in 1960, and there was always a lot of music being played around my house. Early Beatles, the Monkees, The Beach Boys, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Dick Dale, the Astronauts, the Byrds, Bob Dylan.

I grew and things got more mature - Blue Cheer, the MC5, Hendrix, Zeppelin, King Crimson.

I loved, and still love Psychedelic/Art/Progressive Rock and Jazz Fusion.

But a lot of those bands did start to disappear up their own asses and then I heard Iggy and the Stooges, The Ramones, The Sex Pistols and X.

In X I heard the folk and country music roots - Johnny and June Carter Cash.

In the Ramones I immediately heard the surf and garage rock I loved as a kid. They brought the fun and sense of humor back. The feeling of just grab and instrument and jump up on stage and play.

It's often said that Punk killed Prog - but for me a better description would be that bands like The Ramones kind of hit the reset button on Rock and Roll at a time when that was really needed. It was such a breath of fresh air. Unpretentious and stripped back again to it's essentials - back to it's roots and to what made the music so great in the first place. The timing was perfect. Maybe that is a part of appreciating The Ramones.

Psych morphed into Art morphed into Prog morphed into Glam and Glam kinda split off into Punk and New Wave.

Bands like Pink Floyd and King Crimson put out some of their best and most successful music right at the height of Punk - and progressive (maybe Art Rock would be a better description) kind of hid in bands like XTC, Television, The Talking Heads, Ultravox - and bands like The Damned and Husker Du still did 17 minute songs and double albums. Great stuff.

Anyway, that's my take on it...
 

 
ROCK ON DUDE!!!

Super solid viewpoint Propayne  : )
Not de Sunday brunch music I was hoping for {#Tongue-out}
 Nailed it.

Propayne wrote:

Well, I will honestly try to answer this -

I was born in 1960, and there was always a lot of music being played around my house. Early Beatles, the Monkees, The Beach Boys, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Dick Dale, the Astronauts, the Byrds, Bob Dylan.

I grew and things got more mature - Blue Cheer, the MC5, Hendrix, Zeppelin, King Crimson.

I loved, and still love Psychedelic/Art/Progressive Rock and Jazz Fusion.

But a lot of those bands did start to disappear up their own asses and then I heard Iggy and the Stooges, The Ramones, The Sex Pistols and X.

In X I heard the folk and country music roots - Johnny and June Carter Cash.

In the Ramones I immediately heard the surf and garage rock I loved as a kid. They brought the fun and sense of humor back. The feeling of just grab and instrument and jump up on stage and play.

It's often said that Punk killed Prog - but for me a better description would be that bands like The Ramones kind of hit the reset button on Rock and Roll at a time when that was really needed. It was such a breath of fresh air. Unpretentious and stripped back again to it's essentials - back to it's roots and to what made the music so great in the first place. The timing was perfect. Maybe that is a part of appreciating The Ramones.

Psych morphed into Art morphed into Prog morphed into Glam and Glam kinda split off into Punk and New Wave.

Bands like Pink Floyd and King Crimson put out some of their best and most successful music right at the height of Punk - and progressive (maybe Art Rock would be a better description) kind of hid in bands like XTC, Television, The Talking Heads, Ultravox - and bands like The Damned and Husker Du still did 17 minute songs and double albums. Great stuff.

Anyway, that's my take on it...
 

 


{#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} {#Notworthy} 
Propayne wrote:

Well, I will honestly try to answer this -

I was born in 1960, and there was always a lot of music being played around my house. Early Beatles, the Monkees, The Beach Boys, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Dick Dale, the Astronauts, the Byrds, Bob Dylan.

I grew and things got more mature - Blue Cheer, the MC5, Hendrix, Zeppelin, King Crimson.

I loved, and still love Psychedelic/Art/Progressive Rock and Jazz Fusion.

But a lot of those bands did start to disappear up their own asses and then I heard Iggy and the Stooges, The Ramones, The Sex Pistols and X.

In X I heard the folk and country music roots - Johnny and June Carter Cash.

In the Ramones I immediately heard the surf and garage rock I loved as a kid. They brought the fun and sense of humor back. The feeling of just grab and instrument and jump up on stage and play.

It's often said that Punk killed Prog - but for me a better description would be that bands like The Ramones kind of hit the reset button on Rock and Roll at a time when that was really needed. It was such a breath of fresh air. Unpretentious and stripped back again to it's essentials - back to it's roots and to what made the music so great in the first place. The timing was perfect. Maybe that is a part of appreciating The Ramones.

Psych morphed into Art morphed into Prog morphed into Glam and Glam kinda split off into Punk and New Wave.

Bands like Pink Floyd and King Crimson put out some of their best and most successful music right at the height of Punk - and progressive (maybe Art Rock would be a better description) kind of hid in bands like XTC, Television, The Talking Heads, Ultravox - and bands like The Damned and Husker Du still did 17 minute songs and double albums. Great stuff.

Anyway, that's my take on it...
 

 


From Duke Ellington straight into The Forest Hills Four!
Thanks for keeping it fresh, RP...  
 handyrae wrote:
I don't understand the Ramones. They always sound to me like a group playing cheesy, throw-back 1950s songs with a bit of a grungy, hard-edged vibe. What am I missing?

 
Well, I will honestly try to answer this -

I was born in 1960, and there was always a lot of music being played around my house. Early Beatles, the Monkees, The Beach Boys, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Dick Dale, the Astronauts, the Byrds, Bob Dylan.

I grew and things got more mature - Blue Cheer, the MC5, Hendrix, Zeppelin, King Crimson.

I loved, and still love Psychedelic/Art/Progressive Rock and Jazz Fusion.

But a lot of those bands did start to disappear up their own asses and then I heard Iggy and the Stooges, The Ramones, The Sex Pistols and X.

In X I heard the folk and country music roots - Johnny and June Carter Cash.

In the Ramones I immediately heard the surf and garage rock I loved as a kid. They brought the fun and sense of humor back. The feeling of just grab and instrument and jump up on stage and play.

It's often said that Punk killed Prog - but for me a better description would be that bands like The Ramones kind of hit the reset button on Rock and Roll at a time when that was really needed. It was such a breath of fresh air. Unpretentious and stripped back again to it's essentials - back to it's roots and to what made the music so great in the first place. The timing was perfect. Maybe that is a part of appreciating The Ramones.

Psych morphed into Art morphed into Prog morphed into Glam and Glam kinda split off into Punk and New Wave.

Bands like Pink Floyd and King Crimson put out some of their best and most successful music right at the height of Punk - and progressive (maybe Art Rock would be a better description) kind of hid in bands like XTC, Television, The Talking Heads, Ultravox - and bands like The Damned and Husker Du still did 17 minute songs and double albums. Great stuff.

Anyway, that's my take on it...
 
I don't understand the Ramones. They always sound to me like a group playing cheesy, throw-back 1950s songs with a bit of a grungy, hard-edged vibe. What am I missing?
I don't know how the Spotify-Pandora algorithms work but I'd bet anything that no matter what your input preferences you'd never hear this set sequence: Thievery Corporation, Duke Ellington, Ramones, Elvis Costello.  Radio Radio indeed.

I remember...
 
 ziakut wrote:
No where else will you hear Duke Ellington and then followed by The Ramones. Way to "F" with my ears. Loving every minute of the variety.

 
Didn't get that segue this time but you're right. RP should survive and thrive because it offers a better selection and flow of music than listener-adjusted streaming services like Pandora and Spotify. Listening to radio can be a passive experience but you have to want to be rowed down a river of moods, memories and associations, to go along with the DJ's lead. I don't know if algorithms can replace people like Bill and Rebecca when it comes to mastery of tapping into listeners' psyches. 

This reminds me of something Steve Jobs said back in '98, I think when he was talking about computers and operating systems:

But in the end, for something this complicated, it's really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don't know what they want until you show it to them. 

Also (not sure if Steve actually said this): It's not the consumers' job to know what they want.  
 LPCity wrote:

It may have been a very regional occurrence along the East coast, but I definitely know that they had to pay for the rights to use the Hullabaloo name and logo.  I remember that they also sold officially licensed clothes; specifically sweatshirts with the pyramid of big letters spelling the name.  Like you I've never found any reference in the few web searches I've done.  My Dad passed away in 2002 and we never found any keepsakes from the club when we had to clean out the house.  I don't think it was a particularly fond memory for him or my Mom.  My older brother and sister and I still get a laugh out of it occasionally when we get together.

 

Thanks for the response, and for not mentioning that I spelled "franchised" wrong in my original post!
...There was a time, in my country, a great rock'n'roll radio, that was closed... for business reasons... {#Wall} :(
 treatment_bound wrote:

Great story—I did not know Hullabaloo was "franshised", as they surely didn't make it to central Minnesota!  There's no mention of the spin-off dance clubs on the Wikipedia page either.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hullabaloo_(TV_series)

 That picture in the link of Petula Clark appears to be the inspiration for the "Laugh-In' opening!

 
It may have been a very regional occurrence along the East coast, but I definitely know that they had to pay for the rights to use the Hullabaloo name and logo.  I remember that they also sold officially licensed clothes; specifically sweatshirts with the pyramid of big letters spelling the name.  Like you I've never found any reference in the few web searches I've done.  My Dad passed away in 2002 and we never found any keepsakes from the club when we had to clean out the house.  I don't think it was a particularly fond memory for him or my Mom.  My older brother and sister and I still get a laugh out of it occasionally when we get together.
 LPCity wrote:

I always crack up when I hear this song just for the opening line "Do you remember Hullabaloo"

Well I remember it because in addition to being a TV dance/music show of it's time (late 60's), it was also franchised out as a live music club in different parts of the country.  My Dad, along with several of his business friends, invested in the franchise and opened a Hullabaloo club in our little town.  It did OK for a while and introduced me to a bunch of good bands from the DC/Baltimore area.  I helped run the lights and concessions even though I was only 11 at the time.

Unfortunately, for my Dad and his partners, it was a teen dance club that did not serve what most older teens are always looking for; beer.  Eventually it went under due to smaller and smaller crowds of kids that wanted to just dance to live music.  It did however instill a life long love of live music in me and for that I am always grateful.  Thanks Dad 



 
Great story—I did not know Hullabaloo was "franchised", as they surely didn't make it to central Minnesota!  There's no mention of the spin-off dance clubs on the Wikipedia page either.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hullabaloo_(TV_series)

 That picture in the link of Petula Clark appears to be the inspiration for the "Laugh-In' opening!



WonderLizard wrote:
This is why the Ramones mattered and still do.

 
So true.

I always crack up when I hear this song just for the opening line "Do you remember Hullabaloo"

Well I remember it because in addition to being a TV dance/music show of it's time (late 60's), it was also franchised out as a live music club in different parts of the country.  My Dad, along with several of his business friends, invested in the franchise and opened a Hullabaloo club in our little town.  It did OK for a while and introduced me to a bunch of good bands from the DC/Baltimore area.  I helped run the lights and concessions even though I was only 11 at the time.

Unfortunately, for my Dad and his partners, it was a teen dance club that did not serve what most older teens are always looking for; beer.  Eventually it went under due to smaller and smaller crowds of kids that wanted to just dance to live music.  It did however instill a life long love of live music in me and for that I am always grateful.  Thanks Dad 


{#Dancingbanana_2}
best segue ever...
 bronorb wrote:
Never got into these guys in the 70's, even less now.

 

I agree. They had tremendous PR.
Oh, my goodness, yes.  Just what I needed.  And the segue to Johnny B. Goode?  Nice, on so many levels.
 
 ShloEmi wrote:
Released: 1980

 

Yep—It gets trashed by many of their long time fans, but I'm still digging it 34 years later.  I really wish there were more songs off it being played here.

Here's a review of End of the Century which I pulled off some blog, and I gotta say it's right on:

>>T
his album makes little sense within the narrative of "The Ramones are the godfathers of punk rock." It would be hard to come up with a producer whose trademark style had less to do with punk rock than Phil Spector. Heck, Phil was the very embodiment of the question I mentioned in the overall introduction ("how much can we add ..."), and thus the philosophical opposite of what the band had done on its first three albums. Teaming up with Phil Spector, it seems, would have transcended any possible accusations of "selling out" and would have entered the realm of "absolutely out of their minds."

On the other hand, though, the album makes a good deal more sense within the narrative of "The Ramones were an interesting modernized update of 50's/60's lightweight pop." Spector was, after all, one of the most sought-after producers of the 1960's, helping to generate hit single after hit single, and in the early 70's he produced albums for George Harrison and John Lennon that are often considered among the best albums of their time. If the band was looking for a new direction for its next album, why wouldn't they consider turning to a man who had helped so many of spiritual musical kin years before?

What made this episode in the band's history so interesting and so volatile was that both narratives had a significant amount of merit and truth to them. These two sides of the band had managed to co-exist just fine up to this point, with both feeding off each other and creating the sound and approach we all know and love, but this album really pitted the two against one another. The "punk" elements are cannibalized and reused in a pretty grotesque way, all in the name of strongly serving the "neo-retro" nature of the songs. The stories from the recording sessions, especially Phil pulling a gun on Dee Dee and Phil making Johnny play a single chord for 8 hours straight, are fairly well-known, and show that this arrangement was a combination that pretty much doomed itself to the stuff of legend from the moment it was suggested. The end result was an album that's one of the strangest I've ever heard, yet strange in a fairly predictable way: endless layers of instrumentation, most individually playing in a punkish manner, but thrown on top of each other until the punk elements disappear, while various other supporting instruments (e.g. saxophone) buoy up Joey's echo-laden vocals.

Truth be told, I really like the overall sound. The main problem I have with the album is the slightly inconsistent songwriting. Songs like "Let's Go," "All the Way" and "High Risk Insurance," as cool as they sound production-wise, and as much as they ostensibly rock, just aren't going to cut it with me when they feel this undercooked in the chord sequences. Plus, I'm still not sure how I feel about "I'm Affected," which is kinda catchy and intense but also sounds kinda ugly to me. I do kinda like the lead slidey parts in the guitars, but I'm not at all convinced Johnny had anything to do with those parts.

Still, there's a lot of great material on this album. The opening "Do You Remember Rock 'N' Roll Radio?" must have thrown everybody for a loop upon first listen, from the opening radio broadcast sounds to the endless layering of instruments to the main sax-driven groove that screams out "50's" loudly with every repetition. The song is incredible, arrangements aside, from a great vocal melody that doesn't sound like anything the band had done before, to the fun looking-back-and-looking-forward lyrics, to just about anything else that Phil buried in the mix just to have. And man, does Joey ever sound great in this context. Another major classic comes later in "Rock 'N' Roll High School," aka the song with the first chord that was played hundreds of times to get it just right. It's largely a rewrite of "Rockaway Beach," but it's definitely a rewrite that I'm glad exists, as the guitar parts and Joey's singing are just oodles of fun. And, well, I dig the opening schoolbell sound, and the totally random explosion sound at the end.

The ballads are represented by "Danny Says" and "Baby I Love You," two songs that are incredibly unlike anything the band had done previously but which I find myself liking quite a lot. "Danny Says" just feels like it should have gone down as more of a classic than it did; it just has a really nice timeless feel to it that I like a lot, and the juxtaposition of the lovely melody with more of the usual Ramones lyrical themes (like sitting around watching "Get Smart" on TV) just fascinates me. "Baby I Love You" is the album's sole cover, of a Ronettes' song produced by Spector in 1964, and while it's more of a solo Joey song than a proper Ramones song (and thus not really a great choice for a lead single), it's pretty nice. I wouldn't have wanted any more songs like this on the album, but it's a neat little novelty.

The remaining songs are pretty nice, overall. "Chinese Rock" is a solid hard stomper that could have fit in well on Road to Ruin, and while "The Return of Jackie and Judy" seems a little too reminiscient of "Judy is a Punk" (and others) for comfort at first, it does have a couple of melody twists here and there that definitely sound like they haven't been used yet. "I Can't Make it on Time" is another bit of mid-tempo rock, and not exactly rousing, but I definitely enjoy the vocal melody. And finally, there's just something incredibly appealing about the "ba ba banana, this ain't Havana" hook in "This Ain't Havana," enough anyway to make me want to give it a second listen once in a while.

Still, for all of the praises that can be thrown out to many of the songs, and for the interesting sound, I just can't give this album quite as high a rating as the last few. There are just a few too many instances where it feels like the cool sound is covering up a clear decline in the songwriting. Still, when everything is put together, I like the album way more than I dislike it, and I happily give it an A. It's definitely the last Ramones album I'd call very good.


 number7 wrote:
I guess I kinda missed the Ramones.
Thought they were unsubstantial.
I was wrong.
They did have something different.
They were and are real.

 
You are forgiven.
 melzabutch wrote:


 
Johnny had great hair.  I remember standing about 10 feet from him at a show in 1980, and the way it moved when he rocked out was MESMERIZING!
Released: 1980
Both the Ramones and Elvis Costello's use of the "rockin" organ remind me of Freddy "Boom-Boom" Cannon's music, real early 60s style.
This is why the Ramones mattered and still do.
No where else will you hear Duke Ellington and then followed by The Ramones. Way to "F" with my ears. Loving every minute of the variety.
I guess I kinda missed the Ramones.
Thought they were unsubstantial.
I was wrong.
They did have something different.
They were and are real.
 jpfueler wrote:
Duke Ellington into the Ramones...There is the reason I so love this place

 
bump.
 SmackDaddy wrote:


Please let me know that your tongue was firmly planted in your cheek.

 
Pretty sure they were actually influenced by the BCR.  
I don't know why the Ramones made this. They had something in mind that I don't get.
this is part of the reason I spent the 70s on , on KFAT-KPIG.....DID NOT HAVE TO PUT UP WITH ANOYING WANNA BES.....{#Dance}
{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}{#Dancingbanana}
YAYYYYYYY!!!!!! Ramones on RP!!!!! Right on!!!!!!!


The genius of Radio !!!      Screw  Televison.


 
WHAT'S HAPPENING!!! {#Roflol}
Yeah, boys, nowadays it all sounds the same to me, too.
 SmackDaddy wrote:


Please let me know that your tongue was firmly planted in your cheek.

 

Why not, they sound similar just dress different.
 apd wrote:
rdo wrote:
I've always thought this was more of a chant than a song.  Just sayin'.
 
The Ramones did list, as one of their influences, the Bay City Rollers, so...
 

Please let me know that your tongue was firmly planted in your cheek.
 bronorb wrote:
Never got into these guys in the 70's, even less now.
 

Too bad for you
 Cynaera wrote:
I think The Ramones are/were an acquired taste. If you leaned towards that three-minute blast of mind-shattering music, you loved the Ramones. If you were more inclined to be analytical and cosmic, you probably liked Yes, ELP, and the Moodies.  Personally, I loved them all, for various reasons. I'd danced under a mirrorball with gay men (and women) until I'd had my fill of the danger and ambiguousness of disco, and right about the time I faded from that whole scene, The Ramones (well, and MC5, who'd been around forever) slammed me upside the head, and I was like a pinball, bouncing from rock to rock. I honestly don't know how I survived from 1974 to today, with all the twists and spins I experienced while I was trying to find my musical focus.

I think I've found it, and The Ramones are still very close to my heart, though they don't exist anymore and at least one of the members is dead.  They left a legacy, similar to the Sex Pistols (which I could do without, but who nevertheless contributed a huge amount of valid material to the music-pool.)  So - music is flux, not anchor (read your Jack Chalker for this one.)  It moves, though its roots are firm. We all love different types of music for different reasons, but it's all music.

And I love it all, even if sometimes I can't bear to listen to it.{#Mrgreen}

 
Not to be all school marmy, but in reality the Sex Pistols only put out one proper album - Nevermind the Bollocks (in their original form i.e., excluding Filthy Lucre). Some additional material on The Great Rock n Roll Swindle, but that's about it. Everything else was rehashed and repackaged with maybe an added outtake, demo or live recording thrown in. They did indeed have a HUGE influence.
 Cynaera wrote:
I hear the Ramones and I just want to dance. It gets embarrassing when I'm watering plants at the nursery/greenhouse, but I just can't help it. So - my co-workers think I'm a little bit "teched in the head," but that's okay - it relieves me of having to make conversation.
 

Miss you so much, Cynaera...
Never got into these guys in the 70's, even less now.
 jpfueler wrote:
Duke Ellington into the Ramones...There is the reason I so love this place
 
  {#Dancingbanana_2}
I certainly do !

 
rdo wrote:
I've always thought this was more of a chant than a song.  Just sayin'.
 
The Ramones did list, as one of their influences, the Bay City Rollers, so...
Duke Ellington into the Ramones...There is the reason I so love this place
I've always thought this was more of a chant than a song.  Just sayin'.
 Propayne wrote:
… I'm sooo glad I got to see them perform live.…
 
Lucky! I think they'd be/have been a great act live! (BTW, this song has a *great* hook! IMHO)
Just can't seem to appreciate this. I get their significance but just seems like that time has passed.....

 yuel wrote:
R.I.P.

Joey, Johnny & DeeDee-

i miss the ramones....
 

Lordy, me too. I'm sooo glad I got to see them perform live.

The rock-n-roll cliche is that it's usually the drummers that go first - except with the Ramones it would seem. 
R.I.P.

Joey, Johnny & DeeDee-

i miss the ramones....
 LongGoneDaddy wrote:
i do remember 1979 becoming 1980, lying in bed with the covers pulled over my head, radio so low that no one can hear.   but they didn't play the Ramones on the radio back then....
 

Yeah, this song would have been perfect radio material, but we got "Supertramppled" to death back then.
i do remember 1979 becoming 1980, lying in bed with the covers pulled over my head, radio so low that no one can hear.   but they didn't play the Ramones on the radio back then....
 Art_Carnage wrote:
Awesome what you can do, with just 4 chords.
 

copy that...
 Cynaera wrote:
I think The Ramones are/were an acquired taste. If you leaned towards that three-minute blast of mind-shattering music, you loved the Ramones. If you were more inclined to be analytical and cosmic, you probably liked Yes, ELP, and the Moodies.  Personally, I loved them all, for various reasons. I'd danced under a mirrorball with gay men (and women) until I'd had my fill of the danger and ambiguousness of disco, and right about the time I faded from that whole scene, The Ramones (well, and MC5, who'd been around forever) slammed me upside the head, and I was like a pinball, bouncing from rock to rock. I honestly don't know how I survived from 1974 to today, with all the twists and spins I experienced while I was trying to find my musical focus.

I think I've found it, and The Ramones are still very close to my heart, though they don't exist anymore and at least one of the members is dead.  They left a legacy, similar to the Sex Pistols (which I could do without, but who nevertheless contributed a huge amount of valid material to the music-pool.)  So - music is flux, not anchor (read your Jack Chalker for this one.)  It moves, though its roots are firm. We all love different types of music for different reasons, but it's all music.

And I love it all, even if sometimes I can't bear to listen to it.{#Mrgreen}

 
 You say the darnedest things, Marina.
 hencini wrote:
Not what I'd consider "classic" Ramones but I love it.  Wall of Sound > *
 

8—>9  This really is brilliant... As is the current RP lineup: I Heard Ramona Sing —> Do You Remember Rock 'n' Roll Radio —> Radio, Radio.  Three of my favorite artists in a row there... Nicely done, Bill... 
Phil Spector and the Ramones..kind of makes sense somehow
Not what I'd consider "classic" Ramones but I love it.  Wall of Sound > *
What I loved—absolute, unquestioning love—about punk was its elasticity. The Ramones, arguably one of the prototypical punk bands, were nothing more than a throwback to the AM rock'n'pop that I grew up with. Even something as subversive as "I Wanna Be Sedated" was set to elemental chords and a trad/rad song structure. RIP Joey Ramone.
I hear the Ramones and I just want to dance. It gets embarrassing when I'm watering plants at the nursery/greenhouse, but I just can't help it. So - my co-workers think I'm a little bit "teched in the head," but that's okay - it relieves me of having to make conversation.
 sbegf wrote:
I like the Ramones, but this song sounds like it should be part of a Scooby Doo movie....just not enjoyable to listen too...
 

And this is different than other Ramones songs in which way?
I like the Ramones, but this song sounds like it should be part of a Scooby Doo movie....just not enjoyable to listen too...
Awesome what you can do, with just 4 chords.
Good tune, but I prefer the shorter, punchier songs from their first 4 albums.
I wonder if the voice of Otto from the Simpsons was based on the Ramones? ;)

Viva punk! 7 from the rock 'n' rollin' Nottingham jury.
IMO Ramones tunes all sound too similar.  I like them all, they just need to be one at a time {#Drummer}
Nah, I don't remember R&R radio like the way they just sang it{#Puke}
I think The Ramones are/were an acquired taste. If you leaned towards that three-minute blast of mind-shattering music, you loved the Ramones. If you were more inclined to be analytical and cosmic, you probably liked Yes, ELP, and the Moodies.  Personally, I loved them all, for various reasons. I'd danced under a mirrorball with gay men (and women) until I'd had my fill of the danger and ambiguousness of disco, and right about the time I faded from that whole scene, The Ramones (well, and MC5, who'd been around forever) slammed me upside the head, and I was like a pinball, bouncing from rock to rock. I honestly don't know how I survived from 1974 to today, with all the twists and spins I experienced while I was trying to find my musical focus.

I think I've found it, and The Ramones are still very close to my heart, though they don't exist anymore and at least one of the members is dead.  They left a legacy, similar to the Sex Pistols (which I could do without, but who nevertheless contributed a huge amount of valid material to the music-pool.)  So - music is flux, not anchor (read your Jack Chalker for this one.)  It moves, though its roots are firm. We all love different types of music for different reasons, but it's all music.

And I love it all, even if sometimes I can't bear to listen to it.{#Mrgreen}

 Foot wrote:
Great band, marginal song - the 'marriage' with Phil Spector a complete disaster.
 
Old Phil was just starting his glorious decline into the abyss at that time.  He's done now.  Well Done.

Great band, marginal song - the 'marriage' with Phil Spector a complete disaster.
God I love the Ramones!

I love Yes too. 

Variety is the spice of life, or so I've heard. 
 Hannio wrote:


Why?  Because at the time the Ramones burst on the scene, we had endured the horrible miasma of 70's disco and prog-rock.  If you were around at the time you know what an incredible breath of fresh air they were after years of being tortured with the pretentious and gaudy feculence of Yes on album-rock FM radio. 
 

{#Yes}
RIP Joey!  {#Dancingbanana_2}
Oddly, when I'm listening to this now I think the tempo needs to be upped just a bit.  Certainly not the norm for the Ramones.
HEY HO LET'S GO!!!

Ramones are always welcome in my world.
I think this has to be one of the longest songs they've ever done.  I bet they collapsed in exhaustion after they finished it.  I still love "Rockaway Beach" best, but this one's fun, too.  I love the Ramones. {#Dancingbanana_2}
This isn't my favorite from The Ramones, but I would gladly welcome more from them on the RP.
And those bananas are almost in sync!

coffeeadikt wrote:
{#Dancingbanana}Always a classic.{#Dancingbanana}

More Ramones!



drile
The Ramones are to rock...



what the Hanson Brothers are to hockey


they've got a great DVD out ~ a gazillion little live performances on it
 diazo wrote:
Isn't that kind of like saying you love Cubism, but can't stand Picasso?
 
What's wrong with that? I hate Picasso. Come to think of it, I hate cubism, too.

I heard RAMONa sing.
The RAMONs

Now how about something by RAy LaMONtagne?

 
This song is pretty cool, along with Blitzkrieg Bop, but yes, the Ramones have always sucked ass and I think deep down they even knew that, but to their credit I don't think they cared!{#Lol}
 

 crockydile wrote:
The Ramones always sucked. Always.{#Cool}
 
shred

 keller1 wrote:
<...>
Even if you don't like these guys (and I do), some of the comments here are pretty darned funny.
 
I love to read these comments! Puts me just in the best mood to go to sleep and have funny dreams, happy!
And a great guts Frisbee team, too!

rockola wrote:
Hey - where'd ya get the cool WABX AirAce image, I remember those days, "the radio station of your wildest dreams" Excellent!

jagdriver wrote:


Hells yeah!




{#Dancingbanana}Always a classic.{#Dancingbanana}

More Ramones!

Hey - where'd ya get the cool WABX AirAce image, I remember those days, "the radio station of your wildest dreams" Excellent!

 
jagdriver wrote:


Hells yeah!
 


 bam23 wrote:

Still true. There are some bands that one is apparently obligated to like, despite their inadequacies and, in this case, near incompetence. The Ramones are at the top of the sludge heap.
 
Yes. I publicly admit that I have actually played in the mosh pit at a Ramones show. Fun. Pain. Ah, those were the days.

 ick wrote:
Gabba-gabba-hey!  Is that Squiggy Ramone on sax?
 

I had forgotten about Squiggy —- the least well known Ramone.

Even if you don't like these guys (and I do), some of the comments here are pretty darned funny.
 crockydile wrote:
The Ramones always sucked. Always.{#Cool}
 
Still true. There are some bands that one is apparently obligated to like, despite their inadequacies and, in this case, near incompetence. The Ramones are at the top of the sludge heap.
 segueman wrote:

I once called out "Gabba, Gabba" to a kid wearing a Ramones t-shirt and he just stared at me.
 

Maybe it was the Celine Dion shirt you were wearing?  :)
 ick wrote:
Gabba-gabba-hey!  Is that Squiggy Ramone on sax?
 
I once called out "Gabba, Gabba" to a kid wearing a Ramones t-shirt and he just stared at me.
Gabba-gabba-hey!  Is that Squiggy Ramone on sax?
something VERY likeable about this.....!
 daveesh wrote:
now i'm gonna sniff some glue
  now you got something to do
now i'm gonna sniff some glue
The Ramones always sucked. Always.{#Cool}


Hells yeah!
Hyyy-yeaaaaa!! woohoooooooo!!!