[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]
Liam Frost & The Slowdown Family — The Mourners of St Paul's
Album: Show Me How the Spectres Dance
Avg rating:
6.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 572









Released: 2006
Length: 4:18
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Let the sky grow dark. With a heavy heart, let the funeral start. Let the funeral start. Suddenly it seemed love was just a dream, on a TV screen, in a magazine.

Mother please hold on, Brother please be strong. Yeah, they played a song, we all sang along...'I see trees of green, red roses too...' scattered out for you, on a gravestone new.

I'm 12 years older. I can't stay sober.

There's a bluebird in my heart thats caged and it can't sing. So fill your bloodlines up with bourbon kid and this won't sting. It's like the slowing of your senses just might solve something. Let the mourners of St. Pauls lead the parade.

Suddenly it seems I'm settled in my old routines. Another year has gone, I'll still sing the same, sad songs. So when this snow has finally cleared, I'm gonna swim away from here. Wake my Father's bones, drag his ghost into the road.

'This house could hold nothing but melody, so sombre. Such miserable memory...' Three cheers for love of the simplest kind, lets drink to all that we left behind.

Suddenly it seems I'm settled in my old routines. Another year has gone, I still sing the same, sad song. Let the sky grow dark. With a heavy heart, let the funeral start. Let the funeral start.
Comments (65)add comment
Beautifully moving and sad. 
Cant find this version to buy.
 Dr_Taco wrote:
I wonder if wuss-rock bands like this and Mumford & Sons have ever gotten into a brawl while playing the same venue.  

 
{#Wink}
Funny. 

But I still like the song.  It's an 8 for me, in measured doses.
 Geecheeboy wrote:
I keep expecting to hear "red roses too...."

 
Liam Frost - The Mourners Of St. Paul's Lyrics
 
Let the sky grow dark
With a heavy heart
Let the funeral start
Let the funeral start

Suddenly it seemed, love was just a dream
On a TV screen, In a magazine

Mother please hold on, brother please, be strong
Yeah they played this song, we all sang along

I see trees of green, red roses too
Scattered out for you, on gravestone, new

I'm twelve years older, I can't stay sober
And there's a bluebird in my heart that's caged and it can't sing
So fill your bloodlines up with bourbon kid and this won't sting
It's like the slowing of your senses just might solve something
Let the mourners of St. Paul's lead the parade

Suddenly it seems, I'm settled in my old routines
Another year has gone, I still sing the same sad song
So when the snow is finally clear, I'm gonna swim away from here
And wake my father's bones, drag his ghost into the road

This house could hold nothing but melodies
So sombre, such miserable memory
Three cheers for love of the simplest kind
Let's drink to all that we've left behind

Let the funeral start
Let the funeral start

Let the funeral start
Let the funeral start

Suddenly it seems, I'm settled in my old routines
Another year has gone, I still sing the same sad song

Let the sky grow dark, with a heavy heart
Let the funeral start (Let the funeral start)
Let the funeral start (Let the funeral start) 

Ike{#Guitarist}
Never heard of this one.  Quite likable.  :-)
I wonder if wuss-rock bands like this and Mumford & Sons have ever gotten into a brawl while playing the same venue.  
I psd'd from Arcade Fire "Rebellion" and came to this. Like many AF offerings, it's about sorrow and the disillusion(ment) of our time, but I find it much lovelier and more evocative. It's artful music, as opposed to the bland synthetics of the AF brand.  
What a beautiful but sorrowful song. The poetry of agony. 
 
 kaleb wrote:
Gweniviere wrote:
I sure wish you could buy this in the states.

{#Cry}
 
Agreed! Can't find it on Amazon, iTunes, etc... anyone have a link for us to purchase this great one?


 
any updates on how one can purchase this song in the U.S.?
I keep expecting to hear "red roses too...."
Lovely song. It grows on me. 
Gweniviere wrote:
I sure wish you could buy this in the states.

{#Cry}
 
Agreed! Can't find it on Amazon, iTunes, etc... anyone have a link for us to purchase this great one?

Are they still camping outside St Paul's?

Okay..for some reason this song is giving me chills.  WOW
I sure wish you could buy this in the states.

{#Cry}
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Reminded me of Airborne Toxic Event (the band, that is).
  I think one of my dogs just had a Toxic Airborne Event.
Ouch.
Reminded me of Airborne Toxic Event (the band, that is).

I absolutely love this song. I've had a lot of family/close people pass on in a fairly short amount of time and it just strikes a chord with me.
 Papernapkin wrote:
The problems with ranking a song: You might hear something that moves you, but you're unsure if the song will hold up. So you give it a high ranking. Other songs are old that you've heard a million times. You like them, but why bother giving it a high score, especially if you're giving only high scores to music you'd like to buy. It's nice being able to find your 'want-to-buy' songs all in one place. Other songs are pure drivel (Paul Simon comes to mind). You give Paul and his ilk a low score because you really want Bill to stop playing this crap. So in the end, the rankings are meaningless, except to me, and other people who think Mr. Simon is this wonderful man who wrote the most meaningful music from, what, 30 years ago, and you're stuck in the seventies and there's no room for new artists because, you know, you really like Led Zeppelin and the Talking Heads and Yes and yours was the greatest generation and all with the best music. But isn't it nice that Bill plays William Tell Overture. We're so awesomely eclectic.
  
If you're one of the many who don't use the rating option, you still rate.  By not buying all the CDs you don't buy, or by not listening to the music that does not appeal to you, you are consigning the vast majority of performers to oblivion (in your mind anyway). 

Programmers, like the one who runs this station, are the biggest raters of all. They are special raters in that they are gatekeepers to much of what we are exposed to.   By not playing GreenDay or Pavement, highly respected bands who get no airtime on RP, the RP Programmer is effectively giving them a rating worse than sucko-barfo.  That is no small thing.

Fans rate by attending concerts and buying CDs. Which would you rather have, a high rating by some pompous know-it-all, or a fan base? I don't recognize expert opinion in subjective matters like music.  This does not mean that I respect equally those who know nothing about music and those who know a lot (like RP's programmer).  The point is that anyone savvy enough to tune in to RP has a lot to contribute by utilizing the ratings option.  I think RP should pay attention to them and they are definitely not meaningless.

This is positively brilliant songwriting from a guy in his early twenties.
7>8
Contrary to the bevy of tepid comments, I very much enjoy this song and have from the first time I heard it... overproduced? Listen to the content and message of the song and it works quite well...

carp, during a slow part of this, I heard a melody that I mistook for a Mr. Softee driving by outside my building, and almost took off to run him down for a twist cone.


Dunno what the fuss is about.  It's pleasing to these ears.
Regarding ratings, always amazed by the spread in opinions on less well known songs and bands. Also amazed how virulently some folks dislike some of the bands that I regard as wonders of our time (whatever decade(s) that may comprise—God knows when I first hit this world it was Fats Domino). Talking heads comes to mind in the "shocked at how virulently, etc."

So, I'm shocked that others find this song an overproduced 4. I thought combined with the previous two tracks it was one of the more epic triads RP has laid on my head in a while, i.e., great stuff—thought provoking songs that were given enough room to roam and grow a bit.

 
ziggytrix wrote:

Unless you put a typo in your birthdate on your profile, Talking Heads was a bookend of our generation.  Their first album came out in 77 and their last in 1991.

Zeppelin and Yes are from the previous decade.

Just sayin.

As far as the meanings of the ratings?  They're utterly devoid of any objective meaning.  It's just a fun little way to keep notes on what you like.  Other uses, like using them as a shopping list?  Great!  Using them as a method of communication with the station programmer?  Misguided, but sure, fine!  Using them as a method to criticize other listeners?  I guess, whatever, who cares!

 

 RadioDoc wrote:
Sufjan Stevens-class overproduction.  5
 

I totally agree!  4
 Papernapkin wrote:
The problems with ranking a song: You might hear something that moves you, but you're unsure if the song will hold up. So you give it a high ranking. Other songs are old that you've heard a million times. You like them, but why bother giving it a high score, especially if you're giving only high scores to music you'd like to buy. It's nice being able to find your 'want-to-buy' songs all in one place. Other songs are pure drivel (Paul Simon comes to mind). You give Paul and his ilk a low score because you really want Bill to stop playing this crap. So in the end, the rankings are meaningless, except to me, and other people who think Mr. Simon is this wonderful man who wrote the most meaningful music from, what, 30 years ago, and you're stuck in the seventies and there's no room for new artists because, you know, you really like Led Zeppelin and the Talking Heads and Yes and yours was the greatest generation and all with the best music. But isn't it nice that Bill plays William Tell Overture. We're so awesomely eclectic.
 
Unless you put a typo in your birthdate on your profile, Talking Heads was a bookend of our generation.  Their first album came out in 77 and their last in 1991.

Zeppelin and Yes are from the previous decade.

Just sayin.

As far as the meanings of the ratings?  They're utterly devoid of any objective meaning.  It's just a fun little way to keep notes on what you like.  Other uses, like using them as a shopping list?  Great!  Using them as a method of communication with the station programmer?  Misguided, but sure, fine!  Using them as a method to criticize other listeners?  I guess, whatever, who cares!

 lemmoth wrote:

Another older (51) listener who liked what you had to say at first and then realized that you are not talking to RP listeners like me because folks I know who believe that "you know, you really like Led Zeppelin and the Talking Heads and Yes and yours was the greatest generation and all with the best music" are not listening to RP - they are listening to terrestial radio or their own classic rock collections to avoid the commercials.  And that's OK.  Shame they can't have a broader palate of aural pleasure but, whatever.....

Now, what about somebody (hopefully not you Papernapkin) who universally rips most anything created before 2000, or 1990, or 1980 for that matter.  IMHO, they would be just as silly and closed minded.

Oh... and Paul simon wrote some great stuff and if Bill plays him periodically - especially his more interesting explorations, than great.  That's why I love RP.

 
I can't tell by your wording in the 1st paragraph if you were stereotyping me or not...regardless, I'm over 50 and love the full spectrum (Hell, they play Cab Calloway on here - my MOM's favorite from the 40's, and I love that) from Beethoven to whatever came out yesterday.  I even like some Rap for crying out loud.    If it's truly good, it's always good.  True, many old people are SO set in their Classic Rock ways (I call it classic crock....songs you hated then AND now)....but I've sure met a lot of young people that are VERY narrow in their musical tastes also.  All I can do is try to pry all age groups out of their ruts. 
Thanks for listening to an old hipster.
 Papernapkin wrote:
The problems with ranking a song: You might hear something that moves you, but you're unsure if the song will hold up. So you give it a high ranking. Other songs are old that you've heard a million times. You like them, but why bother giving it a high score, especially if you're giving only high scores to music you'd like to buy. It's nice being able to find your 'want-to-buy' songs all in one place. Other songs are pure drivel (Paul Simon comes to mind). You give Paul and his ilk a low score because you really want Bill to stop playing this crap. So in the end, the rankings are meaningless, except to me, and other people who think Mr. Simon is this wonderful man who wrote the most meaningful music from, what, 30 years ago, and you're stuck in the seventies and there's no room for new artists because, you know, you really like Led Zeppelin and the Talking Heads and Yes and yours was the greatest generation and all with the best music. But isn't it nice that Bill plays William Tell Overture. We're so awesomely eclectic.
 
Another older (51) listener who liked what you had to say at first and then realized that you are not talking to RP listeners like me because folks I know who believe that "you know, you really like Led Zeppelin and the Talking Heads and Yes and yours was the greatest generation and all with the best music" are not listening to RP - they are listening to terrestial radio or their own classic rock collections to avoid the commercials.  And that's OK.  Shame they can't have a broader palate of aural pleasure but, whatever.....

Now, what about somebody (hopefully not you Papernapkin) who universally rips most anything created before 2000, or 1990, or 1980 for that matter.  IMHO, they would be just as silly and closed minded.

Oh... and Paul simon wrote some great stuff and if Bill plays him periodically - especially his more interesting explorations, than great.  That's why I love RP.

Sufjan Stevens-class overproduction.  5
2 <== 3
 Papernapkin wrote:
The problems with ranking a song: You might hear something that moves you, but you're unsure if the song will hold up. So you give it a high ranking. Other songs are old that you've heard a million times. You like them, but why bother giving it a high score, especially if you're giving only high scores to music you'd like to buy. It's nice being able to find your 'want-to-buy' songs all in one place. Other songs are pure drivel (Paul Simon comes to mind). You give Paul and his ilk a low score because you really want Bill to stop playing this crap. So in the end, the rankings are meaningless, except to me, and other people who think Mr. Simon is this wonderful man who wrote the most meaningful music from, what, 30 years ago, and you're stuck in the seventies and there's no room for new artists because, you know, you really like Led Zeppelin and the Talking Heads and Yes and yours was the greatest generation and all with the best music. But isn't it nice that Bill plays William Tell Overture. We're so awesomely eclectic.
 

Hey don't characterize all older listeners. I'm 63 and listen to lots of newer stuff...Arcade Fire, Andrew Bird, M. Ward, Nick Cave, The National, Kathleen Edwards, Belle and Sebastian etc etc. That's why I like this staion so much. I agree with your point that it's hard to rate songs. You really shouldn't even if you despise them at first listen.You really can't generalize. That doen't mean the "The Boxer" wasn't one of the best songs ever written either
The problems with ranking a song: You might hear something that moves you, but you're unsure if the song will hold up. So you give it a high ranking. Other songs are old that you've heard a million times. You like them, but why bother giving it a high score, especially if you're giving only high scores to music you'd like to buy. It's nice being able to find your 'want-to-buy' songs all in one place. Other songs are pure drivel (Paul Simon comes to mind). You give Paul and his ilk a low score because you really want Bill to stop playing this crap. So in the end, the rankings are meaningless, except to me, and other people who think Mr. Simon is this wonderful man who wrote the most meaningful music from, what, 30 years ago, and you're stuck in the seventies and there's no room for new artists because, you know, you really like Led Zeppelin and the Talking Heads and Yes and yours was the greatest generation and all with the best music. But isn't it nice that Bill plays William Tell Overture. We're so awesomely eclectic.


sad song, but what a wonderful world it is!!!!!
Ho-hum from the first sung note. Sometimes you get songs like that. The instrumentals redeem it a bit, and the lyrics are interesting, so a 4 from the Nottingham jury.
where can i buy music from this artist?
So today is Make Xeno Cry Day. That's okay. I can take it. I'm tough. {#Cry}
Something about this song reminds me of that one that hit it big in the mid-90s — the one about runaways, and I think Winona Ryder might have been dating the singer or something.  Meh.
I think this song is very cool.  Thanks Bill and Rebecca!
philbertr wrote:
Definitely
That Wonderful World reference got me to sit up and take notice . . . . . . so far, so good . . .
bokey wrote:
Wonderful World lyric quote?
Definitely
soundside wrote:
i like it...
I don't! :puke:
i like it...
Photo-John wrote:
The line about being 12 years old and "can't stay sober," got me.
sounds more like "12 years older" to me. i guess time doesn't heal all wounds. edit: (click here) for a working songmeanings.net link
More up beat items - now what's that number to suicides r us Now Playing: Liam Frost & The Slowdown Family - The Mour... The Shins - A Comet Appears The Smiths - There Is A Light That Never Goes Out need to follow with Bright eyes
I like very much!
Quite nice!
this built up, definitely. groovin' on it now. love what sounds like a choir behind him.
Just bumped it from seven to eight. The line about being 12 years old and "can't stay sober," got me. And yeah, it does build well. Gives me chills. I want to know the story behind the song.
There are a couple of great songs out there that start slow and build up, and I think this might end up being one of them. Have to see how it wears after I've heard it a billion times before I can say for sure, but it's looking good right now.
sandpebble wrote:
His voice is similar to like Billy Idols
Sounds like Lucinda Williams to me.
K, like this more every time I hear it. 8
Very cool. I get the "Josh Ritter - Thin Blue Flame" feeling. Which was REJECTED.
Cool. I like the way the song builds to a finalé.
His voice is similar to like Billy Idols
bokey wrote:
After 3 listens I think this keeps getting better.
I agree - very catchy
After 3 listens I think this keeps getting better.
This might be one of those that sounds better every time I hear it. Right now - for the first time - it's sounding pretty good. Reminds me a bit of the Pogues. And yeah - the Wonderful World reference is nice - very nice.
Not bad. The piano makes it. His voice aint quite my style, though.
bokey wrote:
Wonderful World lyric quote?
I thought I heard that too... :ask:
The piano is neat. For a minute there I thought he was going to start into " i think to myself, what a wonderful world..." and then it picked up, it got better.
bokey wrote:
Wonderful World lyric quote?
Yeah, I thought it was a weird version of it for a second there.
Wonderful World lyric quote?