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The Kinks — Celluloid Heroes
Album: Everybody's in Show-Biz
Avg rating:
7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2071









Released: 1972
Length: 6:16
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Everybody's a dreamer
And everybody's a star
And everybody's in movies
It doesn't matter who you are
There are stars in every city
In every house and on every street
And if you walk down Hollywood Boulevard
Their names are written in concrete

Don't step on Greta Garbo
As you walk down the boulevard
She looks so weak and fragile
That's why she tried to be so hard
But they turned her into a princess
And they sat her on a throne
But she turned her back on stardom
Because she wanted to be alone

You can see all the stars as you walk down Hollywood Boulevard
Some that you recognise, some that you've hardly even heard of
People who worked and suffered and struggled for fame
Some who succeeded and some who suffered in vain

Rudolph Valentino
Looks very much alive
And he looks up ladies' dresses
As they sadly pass him by
Avoid stepping on Bela Lugosi
'Cause he's liable to turn and bite
But stand close by Bette Davis
Because hers was such a lonely life

If you covered him with garbage
George Sanders would still have style
And if you stamped on Mickey Rooney
He would still turn 'round and smile
But please don't tread on dearest Marilyn
'Cause she's not very tough
She should have been made of iron or steel
But she was only made of flesh and blood

You can see all the stars as you walk down Hollywood Boulevard
Some that you recognise, some that you've hardly even heard of
People who worked and suffered and struggled for fame
Some who succeeded and some who suffered in vain

Everybody's a dreamer
And everybody's a star
And everybody's in show-biz
It doesn't matter who you are
And those who are successful
Be always on your guard
Success walks hand in hand with failure
Along Hollywood Boulevard

I wish my life was a non-stop Hollywood movie show
A fantasy world of celluloid villains and heroes
'Cause celluloid heroes never feel any pain
And celluloid heroes never really die

You can see all the stars as you walk along Hollywood Boulevard
Some that you recognise, some that you've hardly even heard of
People who worked and suffered and struggled for fame
Some who succeeded and some who suffered in vain

La la la la, la la la la la la la la la
La la la la, la la la la la la la la la

Oh, celluloid heroes never feel any pain
Oh, celluloid heroes never really die

I wish my life was a non-stop Hollywood movie show
A fantasy world of celluloid villains and heroes
Because celluloid heroes never feel any pain
And celluloid heroes never really die
Comments (322)add comment
https://www.google.com/url?sa=...

George Sanders
I'm sure this piece had it's time and place, but it just does nothing for me. Not even years ago when I first heard it. Good thing there's a "skip" button.
 grahamdillabough wrote:
I much prefer the live version on 'One For The Road'
 
Yes, by far the best version of this song, imho.  The studio version is ho hum compared to this particular live version.

Just played both of these albums in the past week.  
 On_The_Beach wrote:
What, Joe Piscopo didn't make the cut?
 
Brutal, OTB. Brutal.
c.
I think that The Divine Comedy love this song 
 Pjesnik wrote:


Please use either English or Germam words. Your uneven mix of both might have strange smell. 

  
 
If you're going to criticise others' use of language, first you must make sure that your own is spotless.  You seem to be in want of an indefinite article in your second sentence.
Great song, but unfortunately it has a flaw in the lyrics:
"You can see all the stars as you walk down Hollywood Boulevard
Some that you recognize, some that you've hardly even heard of
People who worked and suffered and struggled for fame
Some who succeeded and some who suffered in vain"

Sadly, if they suffered in vain they wouldn't have a star on the Hollywood Blvd.  Beyond that it's great.
Nothing lasts forever. Im now 63 and the song is still as relevant as ever. Pure genius these guys. Peace everyone. ( I hope that’s still relevant also). -John
 Wardleader wrote:


The stars of my parents youth, when America went from a 3rd world poverty train wreck to a young, muscled industrial superpower that waged war across the 2 great oceans of the planet and went home to live with the hope of never having to go to war again in a land of prosperity, of income distribution so wide and deep that poverty was ground down and plans were made to wipe it out like it was polio. We obviously have left that world and the celluloid heroes Hollywood of that by gone era in the dust bin of history. But this song is a bit of scattered light in the darkness of the 21st Century descent into a fascist corporate world order.

 

Unless you were brown, or a woman, or gay ....
Always like to hear this song
 treatment_bound wrote:

Come Dancing (as it was called) was their last MAJOR hit in the U.S., and had a pretty cool video to go with it.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gs2kFrGluKs


My guess is it takes Ray back to his "pre-fame days' as a teenager just trying to raise some hell and pick up chicks on a Saturday night.
   
 
Absolutely.  Fond memories of them playing this Come Dancing in the UR Robins Center, under a giant disco ball, on tour in March '85. 
 Art_Carnage wrote:
I like The Kinks, but this is just dreck. The lyrics are incredibly awful - like something an untalented 15 year-old might come up with for a school writing class.
 

Please use either English or Germam words. Your uneven mix of both might have strange smell. 

  
 Wardleader wrote:


Celluloid:  had to be reminded that . . .The main use was in movie and photography film industries, which used only celluloid film stock prior to the adoption of acetate safety film in the 1950s. Celluloid is highly flammable

 

 Wardleader wrote:
 

This song came out during the Nixon Era and the Vietnam debacle.  If anything it's a paean to a simpler (albeit just as fraught) time... for white people.  The same bent nostalgia for something that was never real is what gave us "MAGA."
I feel like the Kinks are underappreciated. They are an exceptional band. 
 Art_Carnage wrote:
I like The Kinks, but this is just dreck. The lyrics are incredibly awful - like something an untalented 15 year-old might come up with for a school writing class.

 
I agree.  "American Pie" decoded.
 mikeyrad wrote:
I din't care if it's the Kinks or God who wrote this song. It sucks!
 
Incredibly insightful. Perhaps your opinion is adorned with knowledge and culture. OR perhaps you are the type that uses simple one syllable words only. Here are three one syllable words you might understand.

1. Shut  2. Up  3. You

Here are three more...

1. Learn  2. to  3. spell
More Kinks Please!
One of the best. 
"Everybody's a dreamer
And everybody's a star
And everybody's in show-biz
It doesn't matter who you are
And those who are successful
Be always on your guard
Success walks hand in hand with failure"

Sage advice from The  Kinks
Excellent.
What, Joe Piscopo didn't make the cut?
love the song great for the kinks
 ziggytrix wrote:

I can relate.  First 15 times I heard this song I despised it for the lyrics, but I have to admit, the tune itself is damn catchy if you tune the words out.

2->5 

 
6 years later and I catch myself singing along.... sheesh
 zerosomething wrote:
This song should somehow be included in a set that would play Alt-J, Deadcrush 
 
The ref to hero never dying seams apropos 
This song should somehow be included in a set that would play Alt-J, Deadcrush 
 TerryS wrote:
The Queen liked this track, that's why he is now Sir Ray.
This is what I hear LOTS OF PEOPLE telling me, anyway. 

 
The Queen has good taste.  

Once again, RP causes me to pause and listen.

Some insightful comments (Sasha2001 in particular) helped place this song in context too.


 Sasha2001 wrote:

If this song were written about the movie stars of today I would totally agree with your statement. But mr. Davies is referencing an era when the cinema inhabited a space far more influential and mythic. Movie stars of the 30s and 40s literally were heroes in the way they lifted the spirits of Americans and Europeans suffering through the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II. Many of them actually donated their talents to produce war fims for the U.S. government. Later, many of these same icons would be called before the House Comittee on UnAmerican Activities where their patriotism would be called into question by the demagogic senator from Wisconsin, Joseph McCarthy. In the 1950s and 60s European and then American intellectuals wrote about American cinema as a great art form worthy of it's own kind of criticism. Their writings no doubt influenced war babies like Mr. Davies to think about popular entertainment in a new and exciting way. It's from this context that mr. Davies offers his ballad to the cinema icons of his recent past. For many English war babies, American culture was a great respite from the often abusive treatment they received from an older generation that fought during the war and most likely suffered from post traumatic stress disorder. Pete Townsend has talked and written about this, and I think if you look closely at the work of most of the great British songwriters of this time, you'll find similar themes of longing and escape. But In my humble opinion Ray Davies was one of the best at encapsulating a spirit of British repression, escape, and release. For a young boy looking to drown out the sad realities of post war England where are you going to go? To the movie theater or the dance hall. And once you get there the performers take on a mythic, almost heroic status.
 
When this song came out, the entire afterglow of WWII victory and the great economic expansion was just about to be shut down.   The working class was being educated enough to liberate themselves from the power elite, and this was a true as true could be emotional statement about Hollywood.   The stars referenced here had come and gone and but were at least familiar to me as a teenager.   The stars of my parents youth, when America went from a 3rd world poverty train wreck to a young, muscled industrial superpower that waged war across the 2 great oceans  of the planet and went home to live with the hope of never having to go to war again in a land of prosperity, of income distribution so wide and deep that poverty was ground down and plans were made to wipe it out like it was polio.   We obviously have left that world and the celluloid heroes Hollywood of that by gone era in the dust bin of history.  But this song is a bit of scattered light in the darkness of the 21st Century descent into a fascist corporate world order.
 cc_rider wrote:

Outstanding analysis. You mentioned the dance halls too, and 'Come Dancing' is a great paean to those institutions as well.

The funny thing is how many people dislike these two songs.

 
Thank you! Yea, there's such a warmth and nostalgia for the palais dance hall where "the big bands used to play." I love the imagery and the storytelling - it really teleports me to the time and place of Davie's childhood and the obvious affection, however innocent and voyeuristic, he felt towards his sister. In some ways the story he tells might be better suited to a Broadway show (copy-write pending) or movie.

I don't get the hate either, perhaps it has to do with the crowd-pleasing popular elements to the arrangement. 
This is the same band that garage rocked out on "Destroyer??"
Sounds like Puff the Magic Dragon, to me.  I love the Kinks, but this has always been their weakest, to my ears only of course.
I've loved this song from the first time I heard it back in the 70s.   The Kinks will always be rockers, poets, and a guide to Kulchur for all of us commoners.   Everybody is a dreamer.... it doesn't matter who you are.   All the world a stage.
The Queen liked this track, that's why he is now Sir Ray.
This is what I hear LOTS OF PEOPLE telling me, anyway. 
 pankman wrote:
uuuuughh, that's cheesy

 
Yes, but it's a fine English Stilton.  Savor it.  Enjoy it.  Love it.
 Dosequis wrote:

I've seen about 5 movies my entire life and never owned a TV. Couldn't name an actor. Never felt I was missing out on anything.

 
congratulations.
 
3 weeks ago I went to Hollywood & walked down Hollywood Blvd and then drove down it playing this song. My brother and nephew had never  the song before.
uuuuughh, that's cheesy
I much prefer the live version on 'One For The Road'
 thewiseking wrote:

The  "movie star", the celluloid hero, is essentially dead. The talentless narcissist in his ironic t shirt and ripped jeans is not a movie star. Noone will lament his passing in the way Davies does the "movie stars" of old.

 
Why would Peter Noone, of Herman's Hermits, lament his passing?
Not their worst song. Just their worst song that gets airplay.
 Krispian wrote:

Your writing completely changed my perception of the song. Thanks for this edifying piece.

 
I say excellent job, I've been a loyal fan forever, live in Portland, Seattle & saw Ray on his Storyteller tour also Seattle!  Wouldn't have missed a single minute!
I'm NO doubt getting old, but I was exposed to the 60's British Invasion, Beatles, Stones, Who, Animals, & yes The Kinks! It does bother me to read some of those comments, but they weren't like everybody else.  Maybe you had to be there, whatever, so here's to you a ten from me!

 
that intro piano with reverb is misleading. downhill from there.
altho might be a decent soundtrack. of a movie.- i wouldnt pay to see it.
but you do tend to excuse the weird stuff in an ultimate collection. 
Yuck!
I din't care if it's the Kinks or God who wrote this song. It sucks!
 rubenbeagle wrote:
Oh Pul-eeeeze.  I enjoy a good movie as well as the next guy, but our culture's obsession with the actors and actresses is a bit much....

 
I've seen about 5 movies my entire life and never owned a TV. Couldn't name an actor. Never felt I was missing out on anything.
 Ag3nt0rang3 wrote:

Agreed. These guys have written better.

 
What is wrong with some people?

After 40 years this still gets to me just a little more with every listen.
 Art_Carnage wrote:
I like The Kinks, but this is just dreck. The lyrics are incredibly awful - like something an untalented 15 year-old might come up with for a school writing class.

 
Agreed. These guys have written better.
 Boy_Wonder wrote:

Interestingly, he reckons 'Coming Dancing' is his favourite Kinks track.... strange choice, it's good but not great... discuss?

 
Come Dancing (as it was called) was their last MAJOR hit in the U.S., and had a pretty cool video to go with it.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gs2kFrGluKs


My guess is it takes Ray back to his "pre-fame days' as a teenager just trying to raise some hell and pick up chicks on a Saturday night.
   
Saw Ray Davies being interviewed by Julian  (Great Rock'Roll Swindle, Oil City Confidential) Temple at the Laugharne weekend... interesting, but he comes over as a bit of a curmudgeon.... but he wasn't ruling out working with Dave Davies again.

Interestingly, he reckons 'Coming Dancing' is his favourite Kinks track.... strange choice, it's good but not great... discuss?
There is something quite poignant about the aging and declining movie star.  A great companion piece to this song is Billy Wilder's great film Sunset Boulevard.  I am really touched and deeply moved by this song.  Could it be we all identify on some level with those screen idols?  Our celluloid heroes?
1st time I've heard this since Mickey checked out...
 Art_Carnage wrote:
I like The Kinks, but this is just dreck. The lyrics are incredibly awful - like something an untalented 15 year-old might come up with for a school writing class.

 
This post is something a clueless 15 year-old might come up with to troll on a classic track from the library of the mighty Kinks. 

Get back under the bridge.
 
This guy is still alive?

 




Have to love the meaning behind this song.. Sasha you have this one perfectly correct, for those of us who are old enough to remember those times..

The  "movie star", the celluloid hero, is essentially dead. The talentless narcissist in his ironic t shirt and ripped jeans is not a movie star. Noone will lament his passing in the way Davies does the "movie stars" of old.
 Art_Carnage wrote:
I like The Kinks, but this is just dreck. The lyrics are incredibly awful - like something an untalented 15 year-old might come up with for a school writing class.

 
Really? I think it captures an era nicely.
I like The Kinks, but this is just dreck. The lyrics are incredibly awful - like something an untalented 15 year-old might come up with for a school writing class.
 hencini wrote:
Great song. 

 

...and band!

Ray is a HERO in rock-music!


Great song. 
 Sasha2001 wrote:

If this song were written about the movie stars of today I would totally agree with your statement. But mr. Davies is referencing an era when the cinema inhabited a space far more influential and mythic. Movie stars of the 30s and 40s literally were heroes in the way they lifted the spirits of Americans and Europeans suffering through the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II. Many of them actually donated their talents to produce war fims for the U.S. government. Later, many of these same icons would be called before the House Comittee on UnAmerican Activities where their patriotism would be called into question by the demagogic senator from Wisconsin, Joseph McCarthy.

In the 1950s and 60s European and then American intellectuals wrote about American cinema as a great art form worthy of it's own kind of criticism. Their writings no doubt influenced war babies like Mr. Davies to think about popular entertainment in a new and exciting way.

It's from this context that mr. Davies offers his ballad to the cinema icons of his recent past. For many English war babies, American culture was a great respite from the often abusive treatment they received from an older generation that fought during the war and most likely suffered from post traumatic stress disorder. Pete Townsend has talked and written about this, and I think if you look closely at the work of most of the great British songwriters of this time, you'll find similar themes of longing and escape.

But In my humble opinion Ray Davies was one of the best at encapsulating a spirit of British repression, escape, and release. For a young boy looking to drown out the sad realities of post war England where are you going to go? To the movie theater or the dance hall. And once you get there the performers take on a mythic, almost heroic status.
 
Your writing completely changed my perception of the song. Thanks for this edifying piece.
 Sloggydog wrote:
It's pretty cool but I prefer my Kinks faster and wilder {#Wink}
 Yeah.The Kinks can make me rock or yak. This one sorta leans me toward the latter.

note: okay then. can't argue with that (above)
 stevendejong wrote:
Only a 6.8? This is a classic I love to hear every time!

 
No kidding!  This is a great tune!  Timeless musically and lyrically.  Certainly not everyone's cup o tea but a 6.8 seems a bit low....


 Sasha2001 wrote:
 
 
Outstanding analysis. You mentioned the dance halls too, and 'Come Dancing' is a great paean to those institutions as well.

The funny thing is how many people dislike these two songs.
Only a 6.8? This is a classic I love to hear every time!
 rdo wrote:
Everybody's in showbiz, doesn't matter who you are......................
 
That line was funny 40 years ago, but I'm astonished at how it has come to be more real in this era.
 rubenbeagle wrote:
Oh Pul-eeeeze.  I enjoy a good movie as well as the next guy, but our culture's obsession with the actors and actresses is a bit much....

 
Everybody's in showbiz, doesn't matter who you are......................
 Sasha2001 wrote:





If this song were written about the movie stars of today I would totally agree with your statement. But mr. Davies is referencing an era when the cinema inhabited a space far more influential and mythic. Movie stars of the 30s and 40s literally were heroes in the way they lifted the spirits of Americans and Europeans suffering through the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II. Many of them actually donated their talents to produce war fims for the U.S. government. Later, many of these same icons would be called before the House Comittee on UnAmerican Activities where their patriotism would be called into question by the demagogic senator from Wisconsin, Joseph McCarthy.

In the 1950s and 60s European and then American intellectuals wrote about American cinema as a great art form worthy of it's own kind of criticism. Their writings no doubt influenced war babies like Mr. Davies to think about popular entertainment in a new and exciting way.

It's from this context that mr. Davies offers his ballad to the cinema icons of his recent past. For many English war babies, American culture was a great respite from the often abusive treatment they received from an older generation that fought during the war and most likely suffered from post traumatic stress disorder. Pete Townsend has talked and written about this, and I think if you look closely at the work of most of the great British songwriters of this time, you'll find similar themes of longing and escape.

But In my humble opinion Ray Davies was one of the best at encapsulating a spirit of British repression, escape, and release. For a young boy looking to drown out the sad realities of post war England where are you going to go? To the movie theater or the dance hall. And once you get there the performers take on a mythic, almost heroic status.
 
This is a fitting tribute to the song but I'd like to add two more words to support the point made "The Wall"
It's pretty cool but I prefer my Kinks faster and wilder {#Wink}
 Sasha2001 wrote:





If this song were written about the movie stars of today I would totally agree with your statement. But mr. Davies is referencing an era when the cinema inhabited a space far more influential and mythic. Movie stars of the 30s and 40s literally were heroes in the way they lifted the spirits of Americans and Europeans suffering through the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II. Many of them actually donated their talents to produce war fims for the U.S. government. Later, many of these same icons would be called before the House Comittee on UnAmerican Activities where their patriotism would be called into question by the demagogic senator from Wisconsin, Joseph McCarthy.

In the 1950s and 60s European and then American intellectuals wrote about American cinema as a great art form worthy of it's own kind of criticism. Their writings no doubt influenced war babies like Mr. Davies to think about popular entertainment in a new and exciting way.

It's from this context that mr. Davies offers his ballad to the cinema icons of his recent past. For many English war babies, American culture was a great respite from the often abusive treatment they received from an older generation that fought during the war and most likely suffered from post traumatic stress disorder. Pete Townsend has talked and written about this, and I think if you look closely at the work of most of the great British songwriters of this time, you'll find similar themes of longing and escape.

But In my humble opinion Ray Davies was one of the best at encapsulating a spirit of British repression, escape, and release. For a young boy looking to drown out the sad realities of post war England where are you going to go? To the movie theater or the dance hall. And once you get there the performers take on a mythic, almost heroic status.
 

Yes, this is spot on. I couldn't have said it better myself, and doubt anyone else could as well.

To me, this song, and the album it originally came from, is The Kinks crowning achievement.
 Sasha2001 wrote:





If this song were written about the movie stars of today I would totally agree with your statement. But mr. Davies is referencing an era when the cinema inhabited a space far more influential and mythic. Movie stars of the 30s and 40s literally were heroes in the way they lifted the spirits of Americans and Europeans suffering through the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II. Many of them actually donated their talents to produce war fims for the U.S. government. Later, many of these same icons would be called before the House Comittee on UnAmerican Activities where their patriotism would be called into question by the demagogic senator from Wisconsin, Joseph McCarthy.

In the 1950s and 60s European and then American intellectuals wrote about American cinema as a great art form worthy of it's own kind of criticism. Their writings no doubt influenced war babies like Mr. Davies to think about popular entertainment in a new and exciting way.

It's from this context that mr. Davies offers his ballad to the cinema icons of his recent past. For many English war babies, American culture was a great respite from the often abusive treatment they received from an older generation that fought during the war and most likely suffered from post traumatic stress disorder. Pete Townsend has talked and written about this, and I think if you look closely at the work of most of the great British songwriters of this time, you'll find similar themes of longing and escape.

But In my humble opinion Ray Davies was one of the best at encapsulating a spirit of British repression, escape, and release. For a young boy looking to drown out the sad realities of post war England where are you going to go? To the movie theater or the dance hall. And once you get there the performers take on a mythic, almost heroic status.
 
This is a fabulous, insightful response. One of the reasons I love this station (as well as the great music).
thx for this great song.
 Sasha2001 wrote:



If this song were written about the movie stars of today I would totally agree with your statement. But mr. Davies is referencing an era when the cinema inhabited a space far more influential and mythic. Movie stars of the 30s and 40s literally were heroes in the way they lifted the spirits of Americans and Europeans suffering through the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II. Many of them actually donated their talents to produce war fims for the U.S. government. Later, many of these same icons would be called before the House Comittee on UnAmerican Activities where their patriotism would be called into question by the demagogic senator from Wisconsin, Joseph McCarthy. (...)
 
Thank you for your insight, nicely written. Couldn't agree more.


 rubenbeagle wrote:
Oh Pul-eeeeze.  I enjoy a good movie as well as the next guy, but our culture's obsession with the actors and actresses is a bit much....
 




If this song were written about the movie stars of today I would totally agree with your statement. But mr. Davies is referencing an era when the cinema inhabited a space far more influential and mythic. Movie stars of the 30s and 40s literally were heroes in the way they lifted the spirits of Americans and Europeans suffering through the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II. Many of them actually donated their talents to produce war fims for the U.S. government. Later, many of these same icons would be called before the House Comittee on UnAmerican Activities where their patriotism would be called into question by the demagogic senator from Wisconsin, Joseph McCarthy.

In the 1950s and 60s European and then American intellectuals wrote about American cinema as a great art form worthy of it's own kind of criticism. Their writings no doubt influenced war babies like Mr. Davies to think about popular entertainment in a new and exciting way.

It's from this context that mr. Davies offers his ballad to the cinema icons of his recent past. For many English war babies, American culture was a great respite from the often abusive treatment they received from an older generation that fought during the war and most likely suffered from post traumatic stress disorder. Pete Townsend has talked and written about this, and I think if you look closely at the work of most of the great British songwriters of this time, you'll find similar themes of longing and escape.

But In my humble opinion Ray Davies was one of the best at encapsulating a spirit of British repression, escape, and release. For a young boy looking to drown out the sad realities of post war England where are you going to go? To the movie theater or the dance hall. And once you get there the performers take on a mythic, almost heroic status.
The Kinks can make me feel wistful.
 rubenbeagle wrote:
Oh Pul-eeeeze.  I enjoy a good movie as well as the next guy, but our culture's obsession with the actors and actresses is a bit much....
 
I don't disagree, but movies have also been agents of change. 'I was a Fugitive from a Chain Gang' exposed the abuses of the chain gang prisons and led to reforms (several scenes in 'Cool Hand Luke' are practically shot-for-shot remakes). 'The Snake Pit', among others, led to reforms in mental institutions.

Hedy Lamar (sp?) made breakthroughs in communication technology that are still used today. Many stars served in WW II, and not just in promo pieces either. Jimmy Stewart flew a B-24, for example.

Movies have the opportunity to reveal the best, and the worst, of human behavior. For every 'Inherit the Wind' there are a dozen 'Booty Call's.
 Cynaera wrote:
When I first heard this song, I took it very literally.  Now, hearing it again with a lot more sense and cynicism, it's even more pertinent.  It's good - like settling into a well-worn chair with an old friend and feeling comfortable enough to say anything without fear of repercussion.

Love this song. Always.
 
Old friends will be missed.
 smartn1 wrote:
Blah tune and worse lyrics
 
at least one can recognize these rock lyrics.
Priceless. Not talking about them talking about yourself.  In a class with Cortez the Killer and The Rain Song.
Blah tune and worse lyrics
Thank you for adding this smile to my work day. Perhaps my favorite Kinks song of all time.
Oh Pul-eeeeze.  I enjoy a good movie as well as the next guy, but our culture's obsession with the actors and actresses is a bit much....
Simply ... beautiful ... Happy B-Day, my friend!! {#Cheers}
It's a good song but I don't like this version that much. The live version on the "Come Dancing" compilation is much better.
Love it, always have. One of the best live bands ever to take the stage, back when. {#Cheers}
 sirdroseph wrote:


No, I change my mind, this one sucks too.
 
{#Cheers}{#Clap}
This song, in this set, is like the rug that really ties the room together.  
 sajitjacob wrote:
I never really got the Kinks and this song is nauseatingly reverential. Sorry. {#Confused}
 
wah
 sajitjacob wrote:
I never really got the Kinks and this song is nauseatingly reverential. Sorry. {#Confused}
 
I can relate.  First 15 times I heard this song I despised it for the lyrics, but I have to admit, the tune itself is damn catchy if you tune the words out.

2->5 
Ray Davies is a storyteller of the nth degree:  it's a shame that he couldn't reconcile with his brother.  He played Pittsburgh last year with a bunch of young-uns and more than one reviewer called it the concert of the year
I never really got the Kinks and this song is nauseatingly reverential. Sorry. {#Confused}
 lemmoth wrote:


Welcome to RP newbie.  Went to check out what your highest and lowest rated songs and realized you were brand new with only a comment on this classic, brilliant, pop rock masterpiece by the underappreciated and brilliant Kinks.

Please listen more and share your views on other tunes played here.
 

{#Clap}
 milleronic wrote:
Please stop playing this godawful song!
 

Welcome to RP newbie.  Went to check out what your highest and lowest rated songs and realized you were brand new with only a comment on this classic, brilliant, pop rock masterpiece by the underappreciated and brilliant Kinks.

Please listen more and share your views on other tunes played here.

 milleronic wrote:
Please stop playing this godawful song!
  Some of us really like this song. Note the average ranking.

Just sayin'.

Please stop playing this godawful song!
 daveesh wrote:
is mickey rooney the only one mentioned that's still alive?
 

yup
Never a huge Kinks fan, but this one I've always liked-a solid 8
is mickey rooney the only one mentioned that's still alive?
Just have to reiterate my Sucko-Barfo rating for this one. Sorry...I just can't find anything to like about this song.

Great song, although I prefer the live version on 'One For The Road'. 
 Ahnyer_Keester wrote:
Never really cared for The Kinks. Not my cuppa.
 
Thank you for not using that puke icon.  And I think The Kinks are an acquired taste, like oysters or jalapenos.  Not your cuppa?  That's okay, because your cuppa probably has some wonderful stuff in it.

How cool that RP provides for anyone's cuppa, if they'll listen long enough... ;-)  (And I still think you need to find a poster that's named KnockU and post immediately after it...)  I guess I'm an acquired taste, too...

Amen.
When I first heard this song, I took it very literally.  Now, hearing it again with a lot more sense and cynicism, it's even more pertinent.  It's good - like settling into a well-worn chair with an old friend and feeling comfortable enough to say anything without fear of repercussion.

Love this song. Always.
 Baby_M wrote:
Very poignant:

...and those who are successful, be always on your guard
You see, success walks hand in hand with failure down the Hollywood Boulevard....

 


No, almost got it, but ended up cliched.
I love this song.
 sirdroseph wrote:


No, I change my mind, this one sucks too.
 
Another in a long line of examples of your complete lack of taste.
 Ahnyer_Keester wrote:
Never really cared for The Kinks. Not my cuppa.
 
Rather your loss.

Never really cared for The Kinks. Not my cuppa.
Very poignant:

...and those who are successful, be always on your guard
You see, success walks hand in hand with failure down the Hollywood Boulevard....

 sirdroseph wrote:
The Kinks in general suck ass IMO, but this one is alright.
 

No, I change my mind, this one sucks too.
Always sounds like Mother Of Pearl by Roxy Music to me.
I like it.
 westslope wrote:

This song is still fresh because since it was penned, the cult of celebrity in the USA has grown.

 

Though some may argue that the cult of celebrity peaked with the two-time election of Ronald Reagan to the presidency of the USA.


  

Opinion of someone who does not live in the USA {#Arrowu}   

FACT {#Arrow} Canada is a federation that is governed as a parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy with Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state.

(My point: I'd rather have Reagan than a monarch.)


Mawkish and nearly as bad as Candle in The wind. Bleah!
The Kinks in general suck ass IMO, but this one is alright.
Not their best, by a long shot. Each rhyme lands with the thud of dropped sandbag.
more narrative genius for Ray, great tune Paradise :)
God bless the Kinks for this one...and a few others as well.

Wait, it's skipping over dearest Marilyn!
tfodden wrote:

       
how come I'm still listening to Sufjan?

 Hannio wrote:


I always ask myself that very question five seconds into s Sufjan song.
 

That is hilarious!  I like Sufjan, but come on.  That's really funny.