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Philip Glass — Escape!
Album: The Hours Soundtrack
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 739









Released: 2003
Length: 3:46
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(Instrumental)
Comments (110)add comment
Doesn't float my boat but I'm sure many love it and I'll keep on trying to get it. I never hit PSD,apart from Coldplay and Oasis,but I think that's allowed.
Anything by Mr Glass will get an automati 10 from the Portland, UK jury.  His soundtrack to the recent Amazon series 'Tales from the Loop' was as beautiful and profound as the series itself.

I was introduced to his music via my love of Mike Oldfield when I was a teenager in the late 70s.
Long Live Radio Paradise  ?

My rating stays at 8  and sadly  sinking  to 7 - Most Excellent
If I hear it again I will  change to 3 plus  Skip
 
dull noodling....hardly 2
This sounds like the intro to a TV soap opera program
ctdfalconer wrote:

John Cage wrote a piece in 1952 called "4,33".
Excerpt from an essay by Peter Gutmann:
"Most music is trivialized by attempts to describe it. ("The melody is announced by the flutes...") That's not a problem with 4'33". Here's how one performance went: A tuxedoed performer came on stage, sat at a grand piano, opened the lid, occasionally turned some music pages but otherwise sat as quietly as possible for 4 minutes and 33 seconds, then rose, bowed and left. And that was it."

Um, okay, this is a cut'n'paste, because Bill's disabled the "Reply" function for comments beyond/below the first page. But my story is sorta cool, so I cut'n'pasted ctdfalconer's post. Capiche?

My freshman year at university there's a talent show by us just for us. Some of the acts are pretty good, and some are lame. We had a Bob Newhart aficionado, who brought the house down, and a Jonathan Winters aficionado, who didn't fare as well. Then this guy gets up and announces he's going to play Glass's "4:33." Of course he sits down at the piano and does nothing. About a minute into this, we get it—really get it. Folks start booing, throwing stuff, and screaming for this poor slob to get off the stage. He remains calm for another minute, dodges a couple of textbooks, and runs for his life. He wasn't the worst. A lovely young lady got up and in a superb contralto hummed the theme to "Un Homme et Une Femme." She lasted about as long as the Glass guy. Tough crowd.
AAAAARRRRGGGGggggg......! Kill me....Kill me ... killllllll.......meeeeee.....................
But one (#12) of 14 tracks, best experienced in their 58-minute entirety—as is typical of Mo. Glass's works—preferably with a glass of good brandy/cognac/whatever, low lighting, comfy chair, and superb stereo. Cares will vanish for a while.
I am suprised this is rated so good.
Lot of paralel notes and a very elementary use of harmonics.

Edit: He seems to do it on purpose. According to Wikipedia he knows better.
 Zep wrote:

There is something in the composition that is in common with that soundtrack. I had forgotten this was Glass and thought it was a D.A. ST. 

 
I had the same thought!  I was like "Bill, dropping a little Downton into my morning!  Sweet!" 
 agreed!

marcedeleon wrote:
Beautiful music.  Amazing film.{#Clap}
 


Beautiful music.  Amazing film.{#Clap}
 jhorton wrote:
Damn! thought it was time for a new episode of, " Downton Abbey!"

 
{#Clap}
That's Glass?  Not boring, not over & over again dull. Not a replay of Metropolis.  Not bad.
 sunybuny wrote:
It's a gray rainy day in FLA... perfect music.

 
Hey, it's a grey and rainy day in HI!  
Great music from a boring movie.
And I - the only Glass I instantly like. Soft, stirring.  Not the robotic Glass.
 Einstein on the Beach? Hmm... Nice

Art_Carnage wrote:

The only album of Glass's that I don't care for, and I have an extensive collection. Had it just been the music, that would have been one thing. But someone decided it was a good idea to interlace dialog from the movie throughout the work. I really ruins the music. I don't think I've listened to it since I first got it. Too many other good ones to listen to. Einstein On The Beach, anyone?

 

Absolutely love Philip Glass. Thanks for playing this track guys!
 jhorton wrote:
Damn! thought it was time for a new episode of, " Downton Abbey!"
 
There is something in the composition that is in common with that soundtrack. I had forgotten this was Glass and thought it was a D.A. ST. 
Most of Streeps films are quite affecting (imo), but the most powerful moment of this film is her speaking with Ed Harris, him sitting on that window ledge, and jesus you know just what is about to happen, and these 2 actors are so quietly powerful ...  the whole film is beautifully photographed melancholia         -   
 Zep wrote:

Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Philip Glass.

 
Well, to be fair it's more like:

Knock knock who's there Knock knock Knock knock who's Knock there Knock knock knock there there who's knock Knock who's who there Knock where who's there Knock knock Knock who's there Knock there Knock who's knock there there who's knock Knock who's who there - - here

;-)
I thought it was that Einaudi bloke , more audio wallpaper. Poor.
 Baum74 wrote:
The thin blue line ...
Really a good movie, we analyzed it in our English Course at University.
Of course, not the classical hollwood movie.
The score from Phillip Glass is as great as it is depressing. Gives the film a lot of its
emotional deepness.


 
The only album of Glass's that I don't care for, and I have an extensive collection. Had it just been the music, that would have been one thing. But someone decided it was a good idea to interlace dialog from the movie throughout the work. I really ruins the music. I don't think I've listened to it since I first got it. Too many other good ones to listen to. Einstein On The Beach, anyone?
This is one of his better move scores. Though I would put Dracula and Powaqqatsi ahead of The Hours. I was lucky enough to see Powaqqatsi screened with Glass conducting his orchestra live. Possibly my all time favorite movie-going experience.
It's a gray rainy day in FLA... perfect music.
Can't believe it's been ten years since this came out! I got the soundtrack album right after seeing the movie and still like it.
“So long as you write what you wish to write, that is all that matters; and whether it matters for ages or only for hours, nobody can say. ”
Virginia Woolf
Not particularly impressed with much of Philip Glass. Maybe his name should be spelled...Phiiillliiippp Glllasssssss!
I have this in a book of Philip Glass solo piano pieces but it's called Metamorphosis Two. I wish I could play it as well as Branka Parlic.

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x7asvw_philip-glass-metamorphosis-2_music
 ferwoman wrote:
Like the music! (Not the movie, but that's another story.)
 
aww. i liked the movie a lot. this...i'm not sure.
{#Heartkiss}Loving the interesting musical line up this evening OR should I say AS ALWAYS. Thank you R.P!
Like the music! (Not the movie, but that's another story.)
Much ominosity in this one.  (Very ominous.)  Bleak with tones of imminent disastrous occurrences.

Damn! thought it was time for a new episode of, " Downton Abbey!"
 yofitofu wrote:
The only thing more depressing and redundant that Philip Glass music is the movie it's from!
 
I believe you mean "repetitive" - the two words are not synonymous (yet).  There are a great many things more depressing than Philip Glass and The Hours. 

I love nearly everything he does...{#Daisy}..


Escape!?
Shouldn't it be called "Nap"? 

 Zep wrote:

Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Philip Glass.
 
lol - I posted that joke about Philip Glass a few years back and got taken to task for it.

 Deadwing wrote:
The noses.
 
schnazola's.
The noses.
 Candela wrote:
I like this, hope to hear it again soon. Very nice background music.
  very nice background comment

yeah sounds like movie music all right.  Puh-leez
This doesn't do anything for me, but maybe I shouldn't comment on Philip Glass because none of it does anything for me.

 lemmoth wrote:
This music is as repetitive as .....as...... as.......as rock and roll dammit.
 
Finally! I was waiting for it. Cheers.
 Bocephus wrote:
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz...no idea what people see in PG's music. It all sounds the same.
 
Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Knock knock who's there knock knock who's there Philip Glass.
The only thing more depressing and redundant that Philip Glass music is the movie it's from!
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz...no idea what people see in PG's music. It all sounds the same.
cannot go wrong with 'Glass' music

"Death was an attempt to communicate; people feeling the impossibility of reaching the centre which, mystically, evaded them; closeness drew apart; rapture faded, one was alone. There was an embrace in death."  from Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf.



The movie, "Glass in 12 parts"  is fantastic.  A MUST see.

Even if you're not a huge fan, you can't deny that the man is a genius.  Amazing.
Every time Glass scores a new movie, it's fantastic. The score was Koyaanisqatsi was groundbreaking and that was 1982! Sure, a lot of his stuff is repetitive but it's damn unique and impressive nonetheless.

I loved this movie, and I remember the piece from it... touching
 Baum74 wrote:
The thin blue line ...
Really a good movie, we analyzed it in our English Course at University.
Of course, not the classical hollwood movie.
The score from Phillip Glass is as great as it is depressing. Gives the film a lot of its
emotional deepness.
 I agree — the score really added to the intensity of the film, and both stayed with me for quite some time.


 lovemydog wrote:


Can anyone read this? Who would use yellow?

I love this song....
 
I cannot imagine.


Anyone see the PBS documentary on Glass on American Masters?  Interesting piece about a really one-of-a-kind guy. There's a part where his young wife is talking about the obviously difficult marriage (Glass is obsessed with work).  I can't remember right now what was playing but this piece would definitely  be appropriate.  A good bit of TV if you get a chance.  In more than a few ways Glass' life kinda parallels Frank Lloyd Wright.
This music is as repetitive as .....as...... as.......as rock and roll dammit.
if anyone else in southern indiana listens to WFIU, this is the music used as filler a few times a night, between hours of programming
If I may recommend another movie that pivots beautifully around a Glass soundtrack ... the film Mishima.
 lovemydog wrote:


Can anyone read this? Who would use yellow?

I love this song....
 
It is like the music...runs in the background

 WonderLizard wrote:
It is cold, gray, and breezy this morning, and somehow this music is neatly appropriate. 

Yup.
 Candela wrote:
I like this, hope to hear it again soon. Very nice background music.

 

Can anyone read this? Who would use yellow?

I love this song....
I like this, hope to hear it again soon. Very nice background music.

 grbn wrote:
I am a fairly new listener to this station, and yesterday night I found myself wondering whether you would play Glass too - and you do! Wonderful, And I really like this total set: from Arcade Fire to Björk to Glass. An amazing flow! The only bad thing is that it keeps me from working because you forced me into posting an appreciating comment this way {#Biggrin}
 
Isn't this place GREAT?!?  I love the diversity!

It is cold, gray, and breezy this morning, and somehow this music is neatly appropriate. The Hours was a lovely, bittersweet film. (I know: two utterly disconnected thoughts. It's early...work with me here.)
The thin blue line ...
Really a good movie, we analyzed it in our English Course at University.
Of course, not the classical hollwood movie.
The score from Phillip Glass is as great as it is depressing. Gives the film a lot of its
emotional deepness.

I am a fairly new listener to this station, and yesterday night I found myself wondering whether you would play Glass too - and you do! Wonderful, And I really like this total set: from Arcade Fire to Björk to Glass. An amazing flow! The only bad thing is that it keeps me from working because you forced me into posting an appreciating comment this way {#Biggrin}
joanbcn wrote:
boring movie. outstanding soundtrack
I assume you are talking about the movie The Hours. This song was originally from Errol Morris' The Thin Blue Line. If you haven't seen it, I highly recommend it. Watching it now, 20 years later, it's amazing how the "Hard Copy" style news programs that came after it have changed the way North American "news" organizations work. When the movie came out, the re-enactments, music etc seemed revolutionary. Now, it is standard fair. I'm not sure if we should thank Errol Morris or curse him. He definitely had a major influence.
jdorn1 wrote:
When In Rome - The Promise Philip Glass - Escape! Seamless segue!!!!
It was a good one!
music to do something important to.
boring movie. outstanding soundtrack
As the stomach turns....
It was a dark and stormy night ...
I will always remember listening to the ominous sounds of "Koyaanisquatsi" over and over again as Hurricane Frances was bearing down on the Florida coast and I was making the preperations to secure and evacuate from a house that I though I might not see again. A perfect emotional fit somehow.....
jdorn1 wrote:
When In Rome - The Promise Philip Glass - Escape! Seamless segue!!!!
And again. Very nice, Bill! :clap:
Reminds me of music they play while you are getting a massage...ooooooommmmmm
cc_rider wrote:
Overall I really like Philip Glass' music, but it seems like he needs to delve into a new 'system' of creating music. We studied his technique in a 'Music Appreciation' class in the 80's. He takes several independent phrases/themes of varying tempos and lengths, and overlays them, so the music sort of 'evolves' as the phrases overlap. It's an interesting concept and makes interesting music, but it's just ONE technique. Like I said, I DO like it, but as Mr. Glass seems to fancy himself an 'experimental' composer, I would think he would try some other methods of writing. Just my opinion, and worth every penny you paid for it... c.
His score for The Truman Show does expand upon this somewhat. While he uses this basic technique, there is a greater range of subtlety and more variety to the music. No matter what, though, I love everything Glass composes. "Metamorphasis One" is probably my favourite overall, though this track is great as well.
slugore wrote:
I wish that Bill could program the music in my head.
:lol: Me too!
Overall I really like Philip Glass' music, but it seems like he needs to delve into a new 'system' of creating music. We studied his technique in a 'Music Appreciation' class in the 80's. He takes several independent phrases/themes of varying tempos and lengths, and overlays them, so the music sort of 'evolves' as the phrases overlap. It's an interesting concept and makes interesting music, but it's just ONE technique. Like I said, I DO like it, but as Mr. Glass seems to fancy himself an 'experimental' composer, I would think he would try some other methods of writing. Just my opinion, and worth every penny you paid for it... c.
When In Rome - The Promise Philip Glass - Escape! Seamless segue!!!!
I wish that Bill could program the music in my head.
Had to see who this is......... WOW.... I feel an emotional tug.........
I'm pretty sure this one was in the Thin Blue Line, wasn't it?
I'm a sucker for this stuff. My college roommate used to play it a lot.
This is nice....See through Glass
The exclamation point in the song title seems inappropriate.
Bill, you are incredible...this has been a great set. Philip Glass - Escape! Frou Frou - Flicks Loreena McKennitt - Marco Polo Solas - Darkness, Darkness And now, CLASSIC Elton John. This is THE best radio ever.
Phil Glass music totally soothes and interests me like nothing else on the planet. That in itself is fascinating...
tony620d wrote:
seriously.. this is horrible. whats with this glass guy? i could do this on my casio. there's no point to this meandering noise. F!
As a standalone piece, it's pretty okay and average, but Glass's stuff works best when listened in context, such as within the confines of the "Hours" film. Then, and pretty much only then, does it all kinda make sense. :yes:
Probably the second best of his recent movie scores, only surpassed by his score for the silent version of Dracula.
daveesh wrote:
yeah, yeah, i get the whole koyaaniskatsi thing. how about trying something different, mr. genius?
Because what his "thing" is is minimalist and you can get much more simple that minimalist.........
Fabulous, simply fabulous !!!
yeah, yeah, i get the whole koyaaniskatsi thing. how about trying something different, mr. genius?
Please make it go away. . . please.
Daveinbawlmer wrote:
Now this guy records a track of silence. I am pretty sure another artist tried to record a track of silence but then this guy Glass tries to sue the other guy for copyright infringement. Some things I just do not understand.
John Cage wrote a piece in 1952 called "4,33". Excerpt from an essay by Peter Gutmann: "Most music is trivialized by attempts to describe it. ("The melody is announced by the flutes...") That's not a problem with 4'33". Here's how one performance went: A tuxedoed performer came on stage, sat at a grand piano, opened the lid, occasionally turned some music pages but otherwise sat as quietly as possible for 4 minutes and 33 seconds, then rose, bowed and left. And that was it."
tony620d wrote:
seriously.. this is horrible. whats with this glass guy? i could do this on my casio. there's no point to this meandering noise. F!
Geez, Tony...You're not even trying. It's about sensation, not melody. Were you trying to dance to it or what? :doh:
The soundtrack he did for Kundun is better.
seriously.. this is horrible. whats with this glass guy? i could do this on my casio. there's no point to this meandering noise. F!
This gets a 10, but the original version (from Glassworks) gets an 11.
Someone suggested this movie to me and I asked why do I want to see a movie about all women? (I'm a GWM.) I was so mesmerized with what was going on in the story then I realized how much the soundtrack added to the film. If you never seen The Hours, go rent it and watch it twice...once for the incredible story (yes, they compress three intertwined lives into less than two hours!) and once for the soundtrack. I wouldn't call Philip Glass "God," but in the right place and right time...he's right! :sunny.gif:
Wanted to see the film anyway . . . . This music is totally relaxing. I can understand now why this composer is so highly regarded by periodicals such as Newsweek.
Daveinbawlmer wrote:
Now this guy records a track of silence. I am pretty sure another artist tried to record a track of silence but then this guy Glass tries to sue the other guy for copyright infringement. Some things I just do not understand.
That's funny! I believe it was Thelonious Monk (sp?) who said that the notes, and the music are not as important as the space (the silence) between....... it may have been Miles Davis who said that as well, but I think it is an important thing to consider when considering any musical piece. This is beautiful! I gave it a 7...
Daveinbawlmer wrote:
Now this guy records a track of silence. I am pretty sure another artist tried to record a track of silence but then this guy Glass tries to sue the other guy for copyright infringement. Some things I just do not understand.
you're thinking of Steve Reich.
This is haunting and romantic. Another reason to rent "The Hours"!
Now this guy records a track of silence. I am pretty sure another artist tried to record a track of silence but then this guy Glass tries to sue the other guy for copyright infringement. Some things I just do not understand.
I think this piece was also in The Truman Show. I just bought tickets to Koyaanisqatsi Live! and Naqoyqatsi Live! on June 34, 2005 at Lincoln Center in NYC. There's also a discussion with Glass and Director Goddfrey Reggio prior to the premiere of Naqoyqatsi. I can't wait. Hearing this music performed live is ana amzing experience.
Philip Glass is truly one of those outstanding composers who is making great contributions to music today, especially in his soundtrack work, from "Powaqqatsi" to "The Hours."
This piece really impressed me tonight. Thanks for playing it.
I utterly enjoyed it! :clap:
Glass's contributions to this soundtrack were, to me, really integral to an amazing film. :cool: