[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]
Miles Davis — It Ain't Necessarily So
Album: Porgy & Bess
Avg rating:
8.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1358









Released: 1958
Length: 4:15
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(Instrumental)
Comments (150)add comment
Posted 2 years ago by On_The_Beach:bryanbeatson wrote:

Obviously subjective ... but, damn, greatest US musician ever?


Top ten without question, and a strong argument could be made for number one.


I believe Miles himself once said it was Louis Armstrong.  It takes one to know one. 
Everything about this is 'king gorgeous...
Where is my martini?
 cc_rider wrote:
To much Jazz! {#Wink}
 
I'll drink to Much Jazz!!

And to my ears, BillG doesn't play too much jazz at all.
Cheers and Long Live RP!!
Prince of Darkness
 
I have been working my way through his catalogue for the last several months.  What a daunting task it has been.  Incredible musician. 
Perfect. Thanks Bill!
To much Jazz! {#Wink}
I would attempt to dance to this in a hip fashion, but I would probably hurt myself. 
So love {#Heartkiss} this complete album

Just sweet.
 bryanbeatson wrote:
Obviously subjective ... but, damn, greatest US musician ever?
 
Top ten without question, and a strong argument could be made for number one.
 fredriley wrote:
I prefer the original, raw and raucous song, to this jazzed-up version, though I suppose it appeals to hip dudes, daddy-oh.

 
the 'original' for me was on the album,  Herbie Mann live at the village gate. Still my benchmark.
I prefer the original, raw and raucous song, to this jazzed-up version, though I suppose it appeals to hip dudes, daddy-oh.
 Skydog wrote:
never enough Miles

 
Absolutely! {#Good-vibes}{#Music}{#Cheers}

{#Cheers}

so smooth ..... so chilling ...... one of the reasons I love listening to RP ... they just throw these gems in ....  


 n4ku wrote:
Listening to this is almost a reason to believe in Jesus.

 
Amen
 idiot_wind wrote:
And please note the subtle but provocative album cover for 1950s America.    

 
I was just noticing that. Interesting ...
 bryanbeatson wrote:
Obviously subjective ... but, damn, greatest US musician ever?

 
Yes, subjective! But damn good on the brass!!
Obviously subjective ... but, damn, greatest US musician ever?
Groov'in
 
never enough Miles
Swank!
And please note the subtle but provocative album cover for 1950s America.    

Davis and Evans were such a great combination. Classic fifties daddy-o!


Sei il migliore Miles!!!
yes, I have had it for 15 years still in my rotation.
cohifi wrote:
I guess I should buy this, too.  Thanks RP!

 
Great idea, a part of the vibe in my life!
Listening to this is almost a reason to believe in Jesus.
It's not from blue
 idiot_wind wrote:
Are your sure this tune is from the "Blue" album?  I don't hear Cannonball, Evans, or Coltrane. 

I've listened to that album a hundred times and this song ain't on it. 

This sounds like something from "Birth of Cool"...a bigger band sound. 

 
It's from Porgy and Bess.
 cohifi wrote:
I guess I should buy this, too.  Thanks RP!

 
Great idea, a part of the vibe in my life!
I guess I should buy this, too.  Thanks RP!
Are your sure this tune is from the "Blue" album?  I don't hear Cannonball, Evans, or Coltrane. 

I've listened to that album a hundred times and this song ain't on it. 

This sounds like something from "Birth of Cool"...a bigger band sound. 
Ah, I feel my sonic envelope has expanded just a bit. 
 
he did a lot of Gershwin, and the Porgy and Bess album is fantastic - his version of Sumertime is amazing. And, of course, Miles being Miles, it's not like anyone else's version.


MassivRuss wrote:
Didn't know Davis ever touched Gershwin. {#Devil_pimp}

 


 MassivRuss wrote:
Didn't know Davis ever touched Gershwin. {#Devil_pimp}

 
Just about everyone does at some point.  This track was originally on his album "Porgy and Bess".
Didn't know Davis ever touched Gershwin. {#Devil_pimp}
I was just thinking the same thought !
 

amprich wrote:
hmmm...didn't know I liked Miles Davis...this is nice...

 


hmmm...didn't know I liked Miles Davis...this is nice...
Herbie Mann killed this on "Live at the village Gate" but this is sweet.
PLEASE PLAY THE ENTIRE KIND OF BLUE ALBUM!


You can get a buzz off that album.   
 
It IS necessarily so, just so.

This dates from the era when MD actually faced the audience BTW. 
Ah, Miles Davis. Nice.
 Sasha2001 wrote:


It's hard to argue with a statement like this because it's your opinion and because Miles was so HUGE. However, for all of music, much less jazz in particular, this view is problematic. Miles was never the guy who invented new styles or genres, he really was a genius at observing what was going on around him musically and than trying to bring that to a more main stream audience - as was the case with "Kind of Blue" which didn't invent modal jazz, but it brought it into the living rooms of the Frank Sinatra set. Also remember, without Bill Evans on Piano, there is no KOB.

As far as musicians go, I think even Miles would admit that he stood on the shoulders of giants like Armstrong, Parker, and Gillespie.

But perhaps your central point has more to do with Miles' vast and unique career as a one-of-a-kind collaborator. To that point he arguably stands alone among 20th century musicians - but than all music has an element of collaboration. Can you see why your statements are problematic?
 

Appreciate your comment and taking the time to reply...but... you have totally missed what i was saying .. he Delved into all genre's of music I did not say he created them  He did not stay in the one genre but experimented with all kinds with Jazz being the main theme. this he continued all his life never standing still stuck in one form of music. And as for saying the Bill Evans made the Album 'Kind Of Blue' that is not an appropriate statement Bill played piano, Miles played trumpet and together they created the Album so to take either away there of course would be no Album, and I dont agree that they created the Album to target the Frank Sinatra etc. market now that statement to me is 'Problomatic'  But you are entitled to your opinions ...and thanks to Bill (RP Bill) I have now dug out the 'Porgy & Bess' Album and am  taking it with me on a road trip today. Good listening to all.  °º©©º° KJ
 Toke wrote:
Without doubt Miles was THE  musician of this past century, his expertise knows no bounds. I have been an ardent follower of him since the 60's. he never ever stood still and delved into all forms of music and the last  studio session he cut an Album with a rap star Easy Mo Bee. I first came accross this track on 'Porgy & Bess' and I urge all serious music fans to buy a copy and follow link to AMG to gain some knowledge of this amazing guy.
 



It's hard to argue with a statement like this because it's your opinion and because Miles was so HUGE. However, for all of music, much less jazz in particular, this view is problematic. Miles was never the guy who invented new styles or genres, he really was a genius at observing what was going on around him musically and than trying to bring that to a more main stream audience - as was the case with "Kind of Blue" which didn't invent modal jazz, but it brought it into the living rooms of the Frank Sinatra set. Also remember, without Bill Evans on Piano, there is no KOB.

As far as musicians go, I think even Miles would admit that he stood on the shoulders of giants like Armstrong, Parker, and Gillespie.

But perhaps your central point has more to do with Miles' vast and unique career as a one-of-a-kind collaborator. To that point he arguably stands alone among 20th century musicians - but than all music has an element of collaboration. Can you see why your statements are problematic?
Some people have talked about Miles' "discordant" arrangements.  Actually, I'm pretty sure that Gil Evans was the arranger on this and several other famous cuts.  They collaborated on at least three albums.  Miles did his improvisational thing within structures that were created (and directed) by Evans.  And I agree with several others here...the arrangements are sublime.
 jadewahoo wrote:
Miles Davis, May 26, 1926
 
He looks pretty good there for just being born.  The color is also great for 1926....  {#Lol}
 Toke wrote:
Without doubt Miles was THE  musician of this past century, his expertise knows no bounds. I have been an ardent follower of him since the 60's. he never ever stood still and delved into all forms of music and the last  studio session he cut an Album with a rap star Easy Mo Bee. I first came accross this track on 'Porgy & Bess' and I urge all serious music fans to buy a copy and follow link to AMG to gain some knowledge of this amazing guy.
 
{#Cheers}
Wow a MD track I almost liked!

Oh yes it is.
 
Miles Davis — It Ain't Necessarily So

Oh yes it is.
 Canlistener wrote:
Like others here I'm not a jazz fan, but I really enjoy this.  The big band sound is nice and it's not 'too jazzy' if that even makes sense?
 
Not very much so, if you ask me.

Edit:

Well, yes, it does, etymologically, if you understand jazzy as a synonym of wild; because a Big Band usually sounds rather smooth. Yeah, I can see what you mean.

Like others here I'm not a jazz fan, but I really enjoy this.  The big band sound is nice and it's not 'too jazzy' if that even makes sense?
Wow.
 Axelito wrote:
Just wanted to rate it 1but i already did..god!!..i hate jazz...
 
JOHNNY?!?

Just wanted to rate it 1but i already did..god!!..i hate jazz...
Great, I like also the big band tunes.
Not a big Jazz Fan, but this is nice!
Miles Davis, May 26, 1926

 Xeric wrote:
Okay, jazz people, I gots a question. When this is just Miles on the trumpet, it's pretty cool. Why, then, when the rest of the band comes in, is it necessary that they play chords that are so bloody jarringly gratingly awfully murderously horrendously discordant?

Fun with adjectives, by my question is serious. Anybody know where this part of the tradition came from?
 

OK, here's my take, for what it's worth: Miles' playing is pure and sublime, and when the big band chimes in, it is a loud and complicated sound. So the juxtaposition is jarring. I love it, but I can understand that it might not be to your taste. 
 Xeric wrote:
Okay, jazz people, I gots a question. When this is just Miles on the trumpet, it's pretty cool. Why, then, when the rest of the band comes in, is it necessary that they play chords that are so bloody jarringly gratingly awfully murderously horrendously discordant? Fun with adjectives, by my question is serious. Anybody know where this part of the tradition came from?
 
Sorry, but unless my musician's ear has suddenly gone dead—and both my wife and daughter have asserted this lately when I sing Christmas carols—but, I'm sorry, I just don't hear one discordant chord in this. Yes, Miles charts some minor thirds and fifths in otherwise major chords, but all that does is make another chord. You want discordant, try Stockhausen or some free jazz. This is pretty tame by those standards.

 randerse10 wrote:
*adverbs. Fun with adverbs. :D

 
Xeric wrote:
Okay, jazz people, I gots a question. When this is just Miles on the trumpet, it's pretty cool. Why, then, when the rest of the band comes in, is it necessary that they play chords that are so bloody jarringly gratingly awfully murderously horrendously discordant? Fun with adjectives, by my question is serious. Anybody know where this part of the tradition came from?
 
 
{#Lol}

*adverbs. Fun with adverbs. :D

 
Xeric wrote:
Okay, jazz people, I gots a question. When this is just Miles on the trumpet, it's pretty cool. Why, then, when the rest of the band comes in, is it necessary that they play chords that are so bloody jarringly gratingly awfully murderously horrendously discordant? Fun with adjectives, by my question is serious. Anybody know where this part of the tradition came from?
 


 pdjpirate wrote:
Proof that there is a God!

Bill, you need to add Miles' "So What!" with Coltrane...THE ULTIMATE!! Here is the Video on You Tube.... (click here)
 

Hey Thanx PD for the link am DL'ing now. How Cool is that man . Takes a smoke break whilst Coltrane is doing his piece..lol... that was the days before 'Chewing Gum' lol

Without doubt Miles was THE  musician of this past century, his expertise knows no bounds. I have been an ardent follower of him since the 60's. he never ever stood still and delved into all forms of music and the last  studio session he cut an Album with a rap star Easy Mo Bee. I first came accross this track on 'Porgy & Bess' and I urge all serious music fans to buy a copy and follow link to AMG to gain some knowledge of this amazing guy.
Aegean wrote:
Booooooooooooooooooooooooooooooring! {#Puke}

Instead of blaming the song, why don't you just admit that you don't like jazz?

Very nice follow-up for Moondance, about 5 tunes back.


Miles Davis is so smooth...  great music...


Can we have the original Gershwin number from Porgy and Bess (I think it was), rather than this super-jazzified, positively baroque version? I remember playing Gershwin numbers in our school band back in the day and they were fun, all raucous energy and couldn't-give-a-stuff-ness. This is supercool, daddy-o, but the sort of thing that you sit in some smoky bar clicking your fingers and nodding your head to with all the other cool jazz fans. Us non-sophisto plebs prefer the get up and boogie version :)
Pretty damn faultless all round, Miles lets it all hang out and the band support superbly
*taps toes*
 redeyespy wrote:


Miles was always looking to break with convention, and the only tradition from which this could derive is the very one that tries to subvert the rules, including this popular notion that music has to be euphonious.

If this is "bloody jarringly...." to you, you might also want to avoid the works of Albert Ayler, Brotzman, even later period Coltrane.

 
Man, I just don't hear it — this song is beauty musicified to my ears. Maybe my ears are tuned to discordant. . .? {#Think}

Xeric wrote:
Okay, jazz people, I gots a question. When this is just Miles on the trumpet, it's pretty cool. Why, then, when the rest of the band comes in, is it necessary that they play chords that are so bloody jarringly gratingly awfully murderously horrendously discordant? Fun with adjectives, by my question is serious. Anybody know where this part of the tradition came from?
Miles was always looking to break with convention, and the only tradition from which this could derive is the very one that tries to subvert the rules, including this popular notion that music has to be euphonious. If this is "bloody jarringly...." to you, you might also want to avoid the works of Albert Ayler, Brotzman, even later period Coltrane.
Xeric wrote:
Okay, jazz people, I gots a question. When this is just Miles on the trumpet, it's pretty cool. Why, then, when the rest of the band comes in, is it necessary that they play chords that are so bloody jarringly gratingly awfully murderously horrendously discordant? Fun with adjectives, by my question is serious. Anybody know where this part of the tradition came from?
OK, I will give this one a go. :stop: I think that Miles was magnanimous when it came to music, especially inviting a select few to play with him. There in lies the fallacy, I would propose that no one could play with Miles. Thus, any attempt would be discordant. Now, I do not necessarily believe this shit, I just think it may help you explain yourself, when you bring this topic up over cocktails! :sunny:
Okay, jazz people, I gots a question. When this is just Miles on the trumpet, it's pretty cool. Why, then, when the rest of the band comes in, is it necessary that they play chords that are so bloody jarringly gratingly awfully murderously horrendously discordant? Fun with adjectives, by my question is serious. Anybody know where this part of the tradition came from?
The definition of :cool:.
This song really bugs me! I can't stop my feet from tapping the floor. I can't stop twisting back and forth in my chair. I can't stop playing air drums. I can't stop flipping my head to the right side every time that stick hits the snare. I can't rate it any higher than a 10. Frustrating I tell ya, frustrating! :arghhh:
:notworthy: Proof that there is a God! Bill, you need to add Miles' "So What!" with Coltrane...THE ULTIMATE!! Here is the Video on You Tube.... (click here)
I totally agree with physics genius. Traffic paintings are food and well presented ears are noise.
buddy wrote:
90% of this post is crap.
Well the guy did say "All jazz sucks, without exception." in a post about Dave Brubeck's "Take Five", so what do you expect?
physicsgenius wrote:
This is like judging food not based on taste or nutrition, but on presentation. Why not just put out paintings of food at that point? Likewise, if jazz isn't constrained by rhythm or melody, why not just play 10 minutes of traffic noise and call it music? It's just as easy on the ear and a lot cheaper to produce.
You're obviously eating paintings and noting that passing traffic is melodic. Such a serious insect.
lmic wrote:
Oy. That squishing sound you hear is Julia Child rolling over in her grave. First: Presentation is *crucial* in cuisine. Second only to smell in creating what we know as "taste." Second: Since music is, if you will, "only" presentation - having no "tangible" component, it is the essence of the craft. Sheesh. Don't know whether I'm more frustrated by that silly comment, or by my getting finally drawn into a PG-generated fake controversy. Miles lives.
Don't get frustrated, get even. Didn't you mean Miles lives
pherthyl wrote:
*sigh* I guess I just don't get the appeal. It's like when someone says they don't like tomatoes and I just can't understand why. I mean, what's not to like? Apparently there is a substance in tomatoes that only a few people can taste and it tastes bad. Well it seems there is something about jazz that tastes bad to me but most people apparently can't taste it. Ahwell, I'll leave the tomatoes to you guys to appreciate and munch on my cucumber instead. Well that came out wrong, but you get the idea.
I understand completely. I think it's the horn that just goes straight through to a portion of brain matter that sends it into a frenzy and not a good frenzy.
Some may notice that part of the bassline/rhythm riff here was stolen by Van Morrison for "Moondance"--not that I blame him for stealing from the best.
Miles Davis virgin, and slightly embarassed by that fact *listening intensely*
pherthyl wrote:
*sigh* I guess I just don't get the appeal. It's like when someone says they don't like tomatoes and I just can't understand why. I mean, what's not to like? Apparently there is a substance in tomatoes that only a few people can taste and it tastes bad. Well it seems there is something about jazz that tastes bad to me but most people apparently can't taste it. Ahwell, I'll leave the tomatoes to you guys to appreciate and munch on my cucumber instead. Well that came out wrong, but you get the idea.
Not really, I hear ya. I've got plenty of years of classical music training, but I, for the life of me, can't get into opera or ballet. I know it's probably beautiful, and on a purely performance scale it's fascinating. But I'm quickly bored to tears at a performance and wonder what the heck they're dancin' and wailin' about.
Jacksonstat wrote:
You and Bill must think alike! He followed this up with Moondance today. :biggrin:
One of the things that made Van Morrison a genius is that he only stole from the best.
It ain't necessarily Moondance, listen to the melody he's belting out- the old blues number is almost intact, under layers of cool. Cool. Moondance starts in the same key, but its a totally different progression, and definitely not as cool, cool tho' it art, as cool it ain't. Miles has Van on Cool. Van may have Miles on Mysticality. But there's only a hundred or so other tunes that sound like what Moondance was derived from. But don't ever look at Song for My Father by Horace Silver and Steely Dan's "Rikki Don't Lose That Number" as chicken-or-egg... nope.
*sigh* I guess I just don't get the appeal. It's like when someone says they don't like tomatoes and I just can't understand why. I mean, what's not to like? Apparently there is a substance in tomatoes that only a few people can taste and it tastes bad. Well it seems there is something about jazz that tastes bad to me but most people apparently can't taste it. Ahwell, I'll leave the tomatoes to you guys to appreciate and munch on my cucumber instead. Well that came out wrong, but you get the idea.
newwavegurly wrote:
Okay, so I know Miles Davis was making music first, but does anybody else hear some underlying orchestration that sounds like "Moondance" by Van Morrison? :ask:
You and Bill must think alike! He followed this up with Moondance today. :biggrin:
lmic wrote:
Sheesh. Don't know whether I'm more frustrated by that silly comment, or by my getting finally drawn into a PG-generated fake controversy. Miles lives.
Know exactly what you mean. Reacting to something that exists only to evoke a reaction. There's nothing as sweet as the sound of Miles' horn, despite what Whiner-boy says!
physicsgenius wrote:
This is like judging food not based on taste or nutrition, but on presentation.
Oy. That squishing sound you hear is Julia Child rolling over in her grave. First: Presentation is *crucial* in cuisine. Second only to smell in creating what we know as "taste." Second: Since music is, if you will, "only" presentation - having no "tangible" component, it is the essence of the craft. Sheesh. Don't know whether I'm more frustrated by that silly comment, or by my getting finally drawn into a PG-generated fake controversy. Miles lives.
...wow...
physicsgenius wrote:
This is like judging food not based on taste or nutrition, but on presentation. Why not just put out paintings of food at that point? Likewise, if jazz isn't constrained by rhythm or melody, why not just play 10 minutes of traffic noise and call it music? It's just as easy on the ear and a lot cheaper to produce.
hmmm, now exactly WHICH painting of food do you mean?
drtjdel wrote:
Do you have a sister? :eek:
:redface:
Okay, so I know Miles Davis was making music first, but does anybody else hear some underlying orchestration that sounds like "Moondance" by Van Morrison? :ask:
meower215 wrote:
ok so btn Phillip Glass and Miles, I am so ready to get in bed w/ my guy and spend the afternoon there instead of here at work!!! sex-E thanx!
Do you have a sister? :eek:
ok so btn Phillip Glass and Miles, I am so ready to get in bed w/ my guy and spend the afternoon there instead of here at work!!! sex-E thanx!
physicsgenius wrote:
This is like judging food not based on taste or nutrition, but on presentation. Why not just put out paintings of food at that point? Likewise, if jazz isn't constrained by rhythm or melody, why not just play 10 minutes of traffic noise and call it music? It's just as easy on the ear and a lot cheaper to produce.
This isn't a style v. substance issue, to which you allude with your food analogy. Additionally, "easy on the ear" never was a pre-requisite for music appreciation. For me, anyway. I happen to really like free form styles of any genre of music. If you have a discerning ear, and know a thing or two about music, you can distinguish what people like to call "noodling" (or even traffic noise, for that matter) from solid, valuable work. Even art, sometimes. Melody: not always necessary. Hooks: ditto.
redeyespy wrote:
To appreciate, you have to get over this whole notion that jazz has to be circumscribed into the limits of having a melody. Different animal altogther.
This is like judging food not based on taste or nutrition, but on presentation. Why not just put out paintings of food at that point? Likewise, if jazz isn't constrained by rhythm or melody, why not just play 10 minutes of traffic noise and call it music? It's just as easy on the ear and a lot cheaper to produce.
I would luv to be sippin on a big ol glass of red wine right now... & enjoy the easy listening of a fantastic artist! Bring it on Miles!!!
lester wrote:
Great example here of why Miles Davis is such a listening pleasure.
Embodiment of The Cool.
Xeric wrote:
Not BAD, as jazz goes, but still suffers from an excess of virtuosity at the expense of melody. . . .
To appreciate, you have to get over this whole notion that jazz has to be circumscribed into the limits of having a melody. Different animal altogther.
supergroverx wrote:
10 all the way. For me, any Miles from about '55 to '72 gets a 10. Coltrane or Shorter on alto, just a matter of preference.
That would be tenor, but I agree with your taste
I really should apply some lip~stick ... give me just a few seconds. So sophisticated, Miles.
Zep wrote:
:yell: Attention guys - if'n you wanna score with your lady, this one works nicely. Take it from me. :smile:
I'd do ya just because of what was playin.' Miles is an aphrodisiac.
This guy is a damn musical genius!! Thanks for the music Miles.
pleseq wrote:
Not BAD, as jazz goes, but still suffers from an excess of virtuosity at the expense of melody. . . .
:eh: I don't really understand a criticism of 'excess virtuousity' when it comes to Miles. He was never about technical acrobatics - his strength was emotion and phrasing. There's probably guys playing in Greyhound stations who could string out notes faster and hold them longer - but there are just a handful anywhere in history that matched his interpretation. - Riff
I`m addicted to jazz :bananapiano: :drummer: :boohoo: :guitarist: :bananapiano: :clap: :yes:
:notworthy:
10 all the way. I wouldn't say jazz is strictly about virtuosity, but it's a huge part of it. Jazz w/o virtuosity is just "standards," nothing wrong with music like that, but it's been heard over and over again for maybe 80 years. For me, any Miles from about '55 to '72 gets a 10. Coltrane or Shorter on alto, just a matter of preference.
I played jazz for years, and everytime I hear a great piece like this, all that comes to mind is: "I'm not worthy".
Hey!!! I was just listening to Miles Davis a little while ago! Bill, are you lurking around in my home or in my head? :whisper: (That could be dangerous and scary, Bill. I don't recommend it!)
Xeric wrote:
Not BAD, as jazz goes, but still suffers from an excess of virtuosity at the expense of melody. . . .
It ain't necessarily so.
BruceN wrote:
Wow, that is good.
I concur.
Wow, that is good. (sorry that's as profound as I can get right now)
JohnDolata wrote:
If you like this, off "Porgy & Bess," then get "Miles Ahead," for starters.
Amen to that. :pray: "Miles Ahead" is just excellent.
algrif wrote:
Explaining Jazz is a pointless excercise. Just listen and get in the groove. Anything else would be pearls to swine. :good-vibes: :good-vibes: :good-vibes:
Sorry, I'm a swine! I think I will never understand this kind of "music".
Perfection.
What a wonderful selection on this rainy day! What fine music!
plutodazed wrote:
If I have to explain my perfect 10 rating for this piece, even I wouldn't understand. :eek: :stupid: :ask:
Explaining Jazz is a pointless excercise. Just listen and get in the groove. Anything else would be pearls to swine. :good-vibes: :good-vibes: :good-vibes:
What a great segue, this tune from Aromabar-Velvet Nights, excellent. Beautiful. Thanks.