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Album: Emerson, Lake & Palmer
Avg rating:
7.7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1692









Released: 1970
Length: 4:33
Plays (last 30 days): 2
He had white horses
And ladies by the score
All dressed in satin
And waiting by the door

Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Ooooh, what a lucky man he was

White lace and feathers
They made up his bed
A gold covered mattress
On which he was led

Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Ooooh, what a lucky man he was

He went to fight wars
For his country and his king
Of his honor and his glory
The people would sing

Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Ooooh, what a lucky man he was

A bullet had found him
His blood ran as he cried
No money could save him
So he laid down and he died

Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Ooooh, what a lucky man he was
Comments (265)add comment
 Steely_D wrote:

Here's how big they were...Headlining over Black Sabbath, EWF, and the fuckin' Eagles, man.

 
Wow!  I'd love to hear Earth, Wind & Fire at 10 o'clock in the morning!

 Steely_D wrote:

Here's how big they were...Headlining over Black Sabbath, EWF, and the fuckin' Eagles, man.

 
Wow, what a line up. My 14 year old self would have come up with the ten bucks for that, if I was in the area. Which I assuredly was not.
 tkosh wrote:
So, when I was in high school you couldn't just go to the store and buy a plug-in timer (or maybe I just didn't have the cash), but I fashioned one from something I found somewhere.  I hooked it up to my parents' console stereo player in the living room with the needle on the end of this song and the volume all the way up.  It was my alarm clock.  As soon as I heard it click on I knew I had just milliseconds to get out there and turn it down or I was in big trouble.  It was very effective.  After a while I got my own record player and moved the contraption into my bedroom with a 300 watt light bulb I got somewhere also plugged into it.  I used other songs too (there was a Blood Sweat and Tears Al Kooper guitar solo, but I can't remember which), but this was one, and it's always fun to hear it again and think of my homemade alarm clock.
 
Great story and memory, tkosh!  I love the ingenuity of us music loving high schoolers!!  And just another example of what the "cell phone" has denied the new generation of....no more separate alarm clocks...let alone analog hands.  Long Live RP!!
 Proclivities wrote:

[The analog moog is] just not mixed loud enough; you can barely hear it at the end.
 
Hilarious!  Not a big fan of ELP but do enjoy this song including the bombastic moog synth bit. 
 Piranga wrote:
Almost impossible to convey how huge this song was at the time.

 
Here's how big they were...Headlining over Black Sabbath, EWF, and the fuckin' Eagles, man.

This.is.bad.
So, when I was in high school you couldn't just go to the store and buy a plug-in timer (or maybe I just didn't have the cash), but I fashioned one from something I found somewhere.  I hooked it up to my parents' console stereo player in the living room with the needle on the end of this song and the volume all the way up.  It was my alarm clock.  As soon as I heard it click on I knew I had just milliseconds to get out there and turn it down or I was in big trouble.  It was very effective.  After a while I got my own record player and moved the contraption into my bedroom with a 300 watt light bulb I got somewhere also plugged into it.  I used other songs too (there was a Blood Sweat and Tears Al Kooper guitar solo, but I can't remember which), but this was one, and it's always fun to hear it again and think of my homemade alarm clock.
enough is enough..... there is a much deeper source of music to dig into with ELP
https://i.ytimg.com/vi/od5zgneJii0/hqdefault.jpg
Love this pic.
RIP Keith and Greg.
 Laptopdog wrote:
I remember buying this song on a 45 single when it came out (yes, I am that old). I had only heard it a couple of times on the radio and loved the sound of that synthesizer. The first time I listened to the single, the 45 started skipping in the middle of the synth part. I might have been a little high at the time and probably sat there listening to the part skipping and playing over and over for several minutes before I realized what was happening. Good times.

 
THAT is HI-Larious!!  The closest thing one gets to that nowadays is accidently turning 'repeat track' on and being too stoned (if that exists :-~ ) to care and listen to a song over-n-over. 

I remember buying this song on a 45 single when it came out (yes, I am that old). I had only heard it a couple of times on the radio and loved the sound of that synthesizer. The first time I listened to the single, the 45 started skipping in the middle of the synth part. I might have been a little high at the time and probably sat there listening to the part skipping and playing over and over for several minutes before I realized what was happening. Good times.
1971 and this song playing at a record store through the largest speakers I'd ever heard.
The smell of popcorn wafting onto the sidewalk.
Zap comix for sale, including the infamous #4.
Approximately this location: Coventry Road, Cleveland Heights

Who says that your brain doesn't get programmed permanently at age 17?

//Of course this record is permanently on my list of tippy-top-rated songs!
 Stefen wrote:
In case you didn't know, that's an analog Moog synthesizer.
 
Yeah, it's just not mixed loud enough; you can barely hear it at the end.  ;s
 sunflowerbee wrote:
{#Notworthy}     {#Notworthy}    {#Notworthy}

  This album was my foray beyond top 40 as a teen. Hugely influential going forward into greater realms of audio, and time spent alone with albums on repeat. Add a little gangha and new worlds were discovered within and without!


This might be my least favorite song off this album. Maybe because it was played so much on the Radio. But I like most of the other songs much better than this one.
 treatment_bound wrote:
Image result for crawdaddy magazine covers

Did ELP spend an afternoon with the Ramones at some point?

 
They wore it first!

Thanks for playing the song, Bill. Every time.


Image result for crawdaddy magazine covers

Did ELP spend an afternoon with the Ramones at some point?
Always happy to hear these guys. Say what you will about prog, you have to be a real musician to play it well — even the "simpler" songs like this one.
Monster in it's day. Still quite enjoyable.
Greg and Ian Anderson performing his Father Christmas (youtube) is awesome.
Have always enjoyed Greg's work.
As noted by the Fred of the Nottingham Jury below, in 1970 synths were new and extremely big & heavy and unbelievably expensive. This was cutting-edge stuff in its day and still sounds great! 

Angry_Old_Man wrote:
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce. 

 


 Angry_Old_Man wrote:
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce. 

 
Yup, it does date the song somewhat. -hehe-

Interestingly enough in later years, bands would imitate an electronic kazoo sound with electric guitars.
Classic song with a bit too much synth sauce. 
Oh what a lucky man I am.
 1wolfy wrote:
I was just a young teen when this song came to be.  I could see the lyrics come to life in my minds eye.  I'm a lucky man to have experienced this song in such a profound way !

 

The song has a strong if incomplete story; it feels like a ballad. It had the same impact on me when I was a teen. Interestingly, Greg Lake wrote it when he was only 12. 
From the height of the Vietnam War........
I have no reverence for this, but I like it regardless.
 On_The_Beach wrote:
2016, what a brutal year.
I echo greenbuilding's thoughts below.
R.I.P. Greg Lake.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/music/2016/12/08/GregLake-large_trans++KQ5Yvlf_tS7m85BSV1LmKmJnyL1UUg_iqbqpa-6GlE4.jpg

 
Omg! I didn't know {#Sad}
Nice, but old, tired, worn out. Time to lay this song to rest and move on.
Interesting that Bill has never played a single track from any of Greg Lake's solo albums. I clicked on the Music/Artists tab above and entered Greg Lake's name and nothing comes up. I Believe in Father Christmas would have been one to hear this time of year or at anytime really but nope.
Perfect, a masterpiece, right up until the very end when curiously it just runs out of steam. Should have faded it out just a wee bit earlier, just before that lil Scottish thing on the Moogy
Indeed it was a sad year for all ELP fans.
Thanks for the song, farewell Mister Lake
{#Notworthy}     {#Notworthy}    {#Notworthy}
2016, what a brutal year.
I echo greenbuilding's thoughts below.
R.I.P. Greg Lake.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/music/2016/12/08/GregLake-large_trans++KQ5Yvlf_tS7m85BSV1LmKmJnyL1UUg_iqbqpa-6GlE4.jpg
I'm just beside myself. How bad can 2016 be?
Greg we will miss you. I will miss you.
I was fortunate to see ELP twice, front row. The Spectrum in Philly. I remember vividly feeling my internal organs vibrating inside my body from the power of Greg's bass. (Procol Harum opened).
Where ever Keith and Greg are, I hope they're jamming.
Greg and Keith were both lucky men.


BIG 10.  Always has been.
{#Notworthy}
Thanks Bill.

We'll miss Greg Lake.
Nice job Bill.  Couple of great tunes to honor Greg and Keith.

Can't tell you how much I loved this tune back in the day... 
In case you didn't know, that's an analog Moog synthesizer.


So sad about Keith.
Good read here,,, interview with Greg Lake.
 https://hiresaudiocentral.com/greg-lake-on-emerson-lake-palmer-in-surround-sound-king-crimson-and-his-earliest-influences/
 
It sounds like it was made in the '70s, as it should - because it was.
Image result for lucky man emerson lake and palmer
 fredriley wrote:

Quite. The keyboards player was Keith Emerson, who was a classically-trained pianist and knew his stuff. The sounds sound pretty dated these days when you get synthesisers for peanuts, but back in the 70s synths were very new, very expensive and very, very big (ELP at one point needed three articulated lorries to cart their stuff around), so this was pioneering stuff.

It's nice that Greg Lake's songs remain in circulation. The ELP stuff (and I write as a die-hard fan at the time) has dated terribly and makes me wince to listen to it, but Lake's songs and singing were simple and still haven't reached their 'play by' date.

 
Interesting.  I agree to the extent that I find most of ELP's stuff 'dated'.  Tremendously influential no doubt.
Almost impossible to convey how huge this song was at the time.
 Zeekei wrote:
S#@$!*t ... I am getting old. Teenage memories {#Dancingbanana}

 
Indeed!  :-)
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Plus I had an amplifier the size of a Buick back in the day.

 
A lot of Buick-sized amps still sound good though. Well they're the size of SUVs now. {#Smile}
 I still have an old McIntosh amp from the early 1980s. Sounds wonderful.  weighs nearly 80lbs On_The_Beach wrote:

Plus I had an amplifier the size of a Buick back in the day.

 

 Paralistener wrote:
Forever one of my favorites!  
 
Always felt that Emerson hammered the moog a bit too heavily at the end of the song though.   
 


 
What? You suggest that Keith Emerson overdid anything?! It is indeed possible. 
Forever one of my favorites!  
 
Always felt that Emerson hammered the moog a bit too heavily at the end of the song though.   
 

S#@$!*t ... I am getting old. Teenage memories {#Dancingbanana}
I remember seeing them in Winterland and Keith Emerson with his Hammond B, sat up on a large pedestal that spun around. It was most excellent.{#Clap}
 LowPhreak wrote:
Maybe you guys have different speakers and rooms now, that can't do the 40Hz and lower range as well? Acoustics are a funny thing, sometimes where the speakers are placed is in a null or node area that boosts or cuts some frequencies in the bass range.
 
Plus I had an amplifier the size of a Buick back in the day.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Agreed!
Used to be able to make the house shake with the vinyl; not so with the ones and zeros.

 
Maybe you guys have different speakers and rooms now, that can't do the 40Hz and lower range as well? Acoustics are a funny thing, sometimes where the speakers are placed is in a null or node area that boosts or cuts some frequencies in the bass range.
I was just a young teen when this song came to be.  I could see the lyrics come to life in my minds eye.  I'm a lucky man to have experienced this song in such a profound way !
 Jelani wrote:
The digital versions, to my disappointment, fail on those deep down low tones. they just don't get to the bottom.
 
Agreed!
Used to be able to make the house shake with the vinyl; not so with the ones and zeros.
RIP Keith Emerson..I was listening to their first 4 albums this weekend in his honor (FLAC files cranked up to 11), but this is the obvious radio-friendly single off their debut :-)
 number7 wrote:
This song has been my "test" song for every time I got a new piece of audio equipment.

I do however prefer to listen to at least the last half of Tank. (the track just before)

Loud, Loud loud!!!!

Wonderful in concert.

The lyrics are somewhat lame but powerful never the less.

Sold many pairs of L100's & 4311's. Great speakers.
Using an old pair of Klipsch Heresy's now.

 
The digital versions ,to my disappointment, fail on those deep down low tones. they just don't get to the bottom.
This song has been my "test" song for every time I got a new piece of audio equipment.

I do however prefer to listen to at least the last half of Tank. (the track just before)

Loud, Loud loud!!!!

Wonderful in concert.

The lyrics are somewhat lame but powerful never the less.

Sold many pairs of L100's & 4311's. Great speakers.
Using an old pair of Klipsch Heresy's now.
That is one awkwardly sung chorus.
cool story Axor!  awesome music played loud brings joy!!!
This needs to be listened to loud!!!! 
Always blown me away since heard it when was about 8.
Something really powerful about song and as for  ending WOW!!  Just amazing keyboard!!
my dad used to try shake the house apart running this through some his pa equipment testing it out and bass bins practically shaking windows out frames
 jagdriver wrote:
I had a pair of those, and then moved on to L200s on a lark. THOSE were speakers! (excerpt)
 
The amazing thing is, I still have those L100s and use them daily!
40 years and counting!
I imagine JBLs are being churned out in factories in China and Mexico these days, like everything else; alas.
Great song of course, but I also get a kick out of the selected imagery for the songs, that flow by on my Android RP app, when the display is tilted the long way. However it's done, it's pretty cool.
 justin4kick wrote:
The Moog solo at the end inspired me to buy my own synthesizer. A bit smaller than the one Mr. Emerson used.

 

Thanks for sharing a photo of that colossal "instrument".  It looks like it required its own truck to get to a gig.
 Further proof why the punks of the late-70's slagged off the pomposity of the prog-rockers from the first half of that decade.


I wonder if the lucky man is Barry Lyndon?
Thanks, Bill, for a blast from my childhood. 
I dig how folks talks of the super low note at the end of the song.  This song will rattle the windows, crack the tile and could jump start your heart like a defibrillator. Great track to check out your turntable cartridge tracking. 
-John
 On_The_Beach wrote:

I know just the note(s) you're talking about, towards the end. I too used to crank this up to test (read show off) my JBL L100s.

 
I had a pair of those, and then moved on to L200s on a lark. THOSE were speakers!

As for ELP, Robert Moog actually traveled with the band to keep Keith's delicate rig running.

And before ELP, Keith was in The Nice, London contemporaries of both Pink Floyd and Soft Machine. Having been a fan since their debut LP, I caught their act when they came to the little ballroom in my hometown of Birmingham, MI (USA). Although diminutive in stature, Keith would pick up his B3 and rock it on one corner to get some incredible sounds!
 Pitjes wrote:
on older HiFi sets it was reference to play the real 20hz bass at the end of the track!

  Yes! And on 'Tank' as well - that coil crushing rumble... Both seem to be clipped in the digital versions.


The Moog solo at the end inspired me to buy my own synthesizer. A bit smaller than the one Mr. Emerson used.

 
on older HiFi sets it was reference to play the real 20hz bass at the end of the track!
Sorry, but ELP to me represents everything that went wrong with rock music in the early 70s.  Supposed to be heady stuff, but it was pretentious and self-indulgent. One man's opinion of course... 
lol @ the chorus
 bb_matt wrote:
Terrible use of a Moog - someone shoot that Moog player! - random noise. 

 
Well, he was extemporizing with a brand new tool, and they just left it on the recording.

And, better or worse, that one solo is what began my entire interest in playing keyboards. Including a MiniMoog with a 15 foot cable separating the keyboard from the rest so that I can wander the stage and imagine I'm Gary Wright.

My solos? Now THAT'S random noise. 
 ojibwe wrote:
Emerson, Lake and Palmer

Can we get an Oxford comma here, please?
 

 
Unless you're Emerson, who contends that this indicates that he gets 1/2 the money, and "Lake and Palmer" get half the money.
I saw EL&P in 1972, Ft Worth.  It was by far the loudest concert I have ever been to.  Stupid loud.  My ears rang for hours afterwards, but man, what a show.  I have tinnitus now, I'm sure EL&P are partly to blame.  That, and a lifetime of loud cars, loud motorcycles and loud women.
Memories ahhhh
Emerson, Lake and Palmer

Can we get an Oxford comma here, please?
 
 ccjemmett wrote:

Pioneer use of Moog actually.
someone  had to try that stuff...
 
Quite. The keyboards player was Keith Emerson, who was a classically-trained pianist and knew his stuff. The sounds sound pretty dated these days when you get synthesisers for peanuts, but back in the 70s synths were very new, very expensive and very, very big (ELP at one point needed three articulated lorries to cart their stuff around), so this was pioneering stuff.

It's nice that Greg Lake's songs remain in circulation. The ELP stuff (and I write as a die-hard fan at the time) has dated terribly and makes me wince to listen to it, but Lake's songs and singing were simple and still haven't reached their 'play by' date.
 ccjemmett wrote:

Pioneer use of Moog actually.
someone  had to try that stuff...
 
I like mine mixed with Bacardi 151.
Unplug the keyboard. Period.
 Orodrigues wrote:
Just 10, no more.

 
...... 10 x2
 to_the_eleven wrote:
"When danger reared its ugly head,
He bravely turned his tail and fled."

 
"He was not afraid to die, oh brave Sir Robin,
He was not at all afraid to be killed in nasty ways
Brave brave brave brave Sir Robin.

He was not in the least bit scared to be mashed into a pulp
And to have his eyes gouged out and his elbows broken
To have his kneecaps split and his body burned away
And his limbs all hacked and mangled, brave Sir Robin.

His head smashed in, and his heart cut out,
And his liver removed, and his bowels unplugged,
And his nostrils raped, and his bottom burned off,
And his penis..."
Just 10, no more.
 bb_matt wrote:
Terrible use of a Moog - someone shoot that Moog player! - random noise. 

 
Pioneer use of Moog actually.
someone  had to try that stuff...
Very nice 

but can we dare to hope for something Yes from this era? Even earlier... 
Terrible use of a Moog - someone shoot that Moog player! - random noise. 
Some of the best use of a Moog, ever ...
hey, i liked your story alot....reminds me of my dad and how he used to play train sound effects records REAL LOUD on Saturday mornings....

bseib wrote:
This song has a special spot in my memory as a kid. My dad was an electrical engineer with a passion for music and HiFi. Somewhere around 1970 he built a pair of Altec "Voice of the Theater" speakers, which were impressive in performance, as well as in physical stature. Anyhow, I believe Mr. Lake intended Lucky Man to have the "lowest recorded note" (a really low "D"). For my Dad, this made Lucky Man a favorite song to demonstrate his Altec's. He loved to turn it up. Really Loud. It was actually quite impressive feeling that note in your chest. :-)

 
 I miss you Dad.
 
 


 bseib wrote:
This song has a special spot in my memory as a kid. My dad was an electrical engineer with a passion for music and HiFi. Somewhere around 1970 he built a pair of Altec "Voice of the Theater" speakers, which were impressive in performance, as well as in physical stature. Anyhow, I believe Mr. Lake intended Lucky Man to have the "lowest recorded note" (a really low "D"). For my Dad, this made Lucky Man a favorite song to demonstrate his Altec's. He loved to turn it up. Really Loud. It was actually quite impressive feeling that note in your chest. :-)
I miss you Dad.
 
I know just the note(s) you're talking about, towards the end. I too used to crank this up to test (read show off) my JBL L100s.
 this sounds so great after that Ween song. wow, just perfect—-and very Ween-like! (My mom had this album.)
Fantastic ending. Wish it had gone on for about 4 or 5 minutes.
This song has a special spot in my memory as a kid. My dad was an electrical engineer with a passion for music and HiFi. Somewhere around 1970 he built a pair of Altec "Voice of the Theater" speakers, which were impressive in performance, as well as in physical stature. Anyhow, I believe Mr. Lake intended Lucky Man to have the "lowest recorded note" (a really low "D"). For my Dad, this made Lucky Man a favorite song to demonstrate his Altec's. He loved to turn it up. Really Loud. It was actually quite impressive feeling that note in your chest. :-)

Altec Voice of the Theater 
 I miss you Dad.
 
 (former member) wrote:

You smell bad...

everybody in my hotel room thinks you should bathe...

we love this song...

 
 

Touche, or should I say Douche.  Miss ya, nonetheless.  O' banished bro of mine.

sublime...  love it...
 
 ziakut wrote:
Ok, ok...I know this is a classic and all. I do like ELP very much...BUT those keyboard swells are just plain annoying. I've always loved everything else about this great song and this amazing band...but it really sounds to me like someone without much thought tinkering with some 'cool new sound' throughout the song. It doesn't really help convey the atmosphere they started in the beginning. Just really annoying and wish it wasn't in there at all. Just my humble opinion...bring it on folks....{#Rolleyes}
 

So you think its a great song (I think its a very good song and Lake is a very good singer) by an amazing band (holding my judgement) that is ruined by the crazy ass synthesizer whooshes introduced late in the song.

Well to me those whooshes are emblematic of what this band was and is, besides being inexplicably my wife's favorites, as led by the biggest show off of all Mr. Emerson, they are a bunch of talented and creative musicians who show off their skills for the very sake of showing off, and hardly, if ever in service of a song.
it sounded good after Ween's the Argus as someone already pointed out.
It's a seven until the whooshing noises in the last minute or so.... so very 70's, not aged well but still good to have heard the rest.
 (former member) wrote:

 
I agree...  love this song...

 
Ok, ok...I know this is a classic and all. I do like ELP very much...BUT those keyboard swells are just plain annoying. I've always loved everything else about this great song and this amazing band...but it really sounds to me like someone without much thought tinkering with some 'cool new sound' throughout the song. It doesn't really help convey the atmosphere they started in the beginning. Just really annoying and wish it wasn't in there at all. Just my humble opinion...bring it on folks....{#Rolleyes}
 DaveInVA wrote:

I've seen them live twice. The first time was the Works tour and Heart played ahead of them at Soldiers Field in Chicago. What a great concert with a revolving drum stage, light show etc. They did about a 20 minute version of this song.
 
My idea of hell!!
 Kokoloco53 wrote:
What a lucky man I am to have grown up in the era when music was in a renaissance of discovering new styles of music, crossovers of classical, jazz sitting on the shelves with hard rock like Led Zeppelin. Though new music today is great, it's still move vanilla in general compared to the mid 60's to mid 70's, before disco reigned. But it's stilla beautiful world for all to enjoy. Thanks RP for keeping the fires alive.
 
The bass line in this is great. I love the cynical lyrics. "No money could save him"....when I was 16 that was cool, not so sure now having read more and written some.... mind you, those ideals still resonate a little....
 romeotuma wrote:

You smell bad...

everybody in my hotel room thinks you should bathe...

we love this song...

 
 

Touché
 rdo wrote:
I gotta hand it to you.  You stick to your guns.  Still, I gotta ask you to spare my carpal tunnel syndrome.
 


You smell bad...

everybody in my hotel room thinks you should bathe...

we love this song...

 
 romeotuma wrote:

Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...

 
  I gotta hand it to you.  You stick to your guns.  Still, I gotta ask you to spare my carpal tunnel syndrome.



Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...

 
"When danger reared its ugly head,
He bravely turned his tail and fled."
What a lucky man I am to have grown up in the era when music was in a renaissance of discovering new styles of music, crossovers of classical, jazz sitting on the shelves with hard rock like Led Zeppelin. Though new music today is great, it's still move vanilla in general compared to the mid 60's to mid 70's, before disco reigned. But it's stilla beautiful world for all to enjoy. Thanks RP for keeping the fires alive.
Very nice indeed!
 dmax wrote:

Written way before 1970.
 
Yes, we should have just said it was released in 1970...

Greg Lake supposedly wrote it when he was 12...  what a lucky lad he was...

love this song...


 
 agkagk wrote:

Absolutely right, dmax. I just looked it up on Wiki. Incredibly, this song was written by Greg Lake when he was 12 ! (1959)
Very impressive!

One of my all-time favorite songs. It blew me away when I was about 13 and started my lifelong love of house-shaking bass (thank you, Mr. Moog).
 
+1

 dmax wrote:

Written way before 1970.
 
Absolutely right, dmax. I just looked it up on Wiki. Incredibly, this song was written by Greg Lake when he was 12 ! (1959)
Very impressive!

One of my all-time favorite songs. It blew me away when I was about 13 and started my lifelong love of house-shaking bass (thank you, Mr. Moog).
 sirdroseph wrote:
When I hear this song, a part of me is firm in the knowledge that I am not supposed to like this, but then I find myself just singing along without a care of who hears me. Vatta u gonna do? Love this song, there I said it.
 
I don't care if I'm "not supposed to like it" - I think this is a great tune.  I've been listening to music since '63 or so and "Lucky Man" is one of my all-time faves.  I still remember the first time I heard it - driving home from junior college classes and listening to it.  Then toward the end, this  "sound" came out of the speaker in the van.  I had never heard the Moog before and it totally amazed me.
It's great to hear in surround sound if you can find the DVD-Audio disc of ELP's Brain Salad Surgery - it's included as a bonus track.
OK, I'll shut up now.

 jagdriver wrote:

This LP was quite a revelation when it was first released. I couldn't get enough of their collective sound.
 
I've seen them live twice. The first time was the Works tour and Heart played ahead of them at Soldiers Field in Chicago. What a great concert with a revolving drum stage, light show etc. They did about a 20 minute version of this song.
 romeotuma wrote:


This song was written and released in 1970 during the Vietnam War, but it is impressive how this song transcends one example and applies to war in general...  this really is a great song...  love it...
 
Written way before 1970.
 sirdroseph wrote:
When I hear this song, a part of me is firm in the knowledge that I am not supposed to like this, but then I find myself just singing along without a care of who hears me. Vatta u gonna do? Love this song, there I said it.
 
I think I have a similar sentiment about this song.  Once I actually started dating girls, bands like this were meaningless to me - The Stones, Lou Reed, or the burgeoning punk movement carried much more weight to me.  I left this flavor of prog-rock with my friends who were still hanging around in their parents' basements, talking about comic books, Star Trek, and Tolkien.  Still, it's a good song.

When I hear this song, a part of me is firm in the knowledge that I am not supposed to like this, but then I find myself just singing along without a care of who hears me. Vatta u gonna do? Love this song, there I said it.
This takes me back to the 70s, when I worshipped ELP. I passed out of that 'phase' soon enough after the refreshing purge of Punk, and now look back on most of ELP's work as highly pretentious baroque noodling, very much of its time. The few songs that Greg Lake was allowed to publish do, though, stand the test of time, and this is one of them. It helps that there's not very much egocentric keyboard wibbling from Keith Emerson to distract from the song. 8 from the Nottingham jury.
 smackiepipe wrote:

Wasn't even a MiniMoog, but the ultra large Modular Moog that stood about 7 ft high. (takes off nerd-cap).