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Yes — Heart Of The Sunrise
Album: Fragile
Avg rating:
6.9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 746









Released: 1971
Length: 10:33
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Loves comes to you and you follow
Lose one on to the Heart of the Sunrise
Sharp distance
How can the wind with its arms all around me

Lost on a wave and then after
Dream on on to the Heart of the Sunrise
Sharp distance
How can the wind with so many around me
Lost in the city

Lost in their eyes as you hurry by
Counting the broken ties they decide
Love comes to you and then after
Dream on on to the heart of the sunrise
Lost on a wave that you're dreaming
Dream on on to the Heart of the Sunrise
Sharp distance
How can the wind with its arms all around me
Sharp distance
How can the wind with so many around me
I feel lost in the city

Lost in their eyes as you hurry by
Counting the broken ties they decided

Straight light moving and removing
Sharpness of the colour sun shine
Straight light searching all the meanings of the song
Long last treatment of the telling that relates to all the words sung
Dreamer easy in the chair that really fits you

Love comes to you and then after
Dream on on to the Heart of the Sunrise
Sharp distance
How can the sun with its arms all around me
Sharp distance
How can the wind with so many around me
I feel lost in the city
Comments (281)add comment
Ah, the thundering bass of the great Chris Squire.
Such a treat.
 kurtster wrote:
Just got the opportunity to listen again for the first time in ages because of the PSD !



 
A real PSD gift!! I mean these were real compositions. Just like the good old Genesis, Pink Floyd and some of that time...{#Clap}{#Notworthy}
 tonypf wrote:

Me too. This time in 2017.  Must be in the PSD drawer. Came here avoiding PFloyd and got this overwrought piece. 

 
Hahahah 


I got this on PSD - June 2018 trying to avoid the Beatles.

More enjoyable this tune...
 CHuLoYo wrote:

Once again, PSD gift 

 
Me too. This time in 2017.  Must be in the PSD drawer. Came here avoiding PFloyd and got this overwrought piece. 
 CHuLoYo wrote:
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Me2.  : )
Last play June 2010. (?)

 



And me. Here a yes fan giving a godlike punctuation. Perfect song for going to work on a spring day

 
Once again, PSD gift 
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Me2.  : )
Last play June 2010. (?)

 



And me. Here a yes fan giving a godlike punctuation. Perfect song for going to work on a spring day
 kurtster wrote:
Just got the opportunity to listen again for the first time in ages because of the PSD !
 
Me2.  : )
Last play June 2010. (?)
Although this may have been pointed out elswhere, I cannot claim to be a YES devotee but always appreciated their music the most when I had reasonable expectations of what they'd deliver. Given the appropriate mindset and time, they usually delivered an exciting musical journey that, even when predictable, was a pretty good (non-commercial) adventure.
Just got the opportunity to listen again for the first time in ages because of the PSD !


I'm 46 years old and have never gotten myself around to enjoy Yes from the early years. I loved the album with Owner of a lonely heart' on it.

This song here is actually the first time I don't stop listening, am intrigued, want to know how it evolves. Have listened to the whole thing although it's quite a lengthy tune.

So... it can take that long - 30 years in my case - to finally feel a connection with a certain band/music.

Thanks RP fo making that possible for me {#Biggrin}     


love this song, and this whole album...



 
 westslope wrote:
What happened to Jon Anderson?
 

A few years ago I went to see the Trans-Siberian Orchestra. After they finished their usual show, the front man gave a little speach praising Yes and thanked them for the influence they had on his musical preference. Then he introduced a special guest...Jon Anderson. Then they performed a kickass Roundabout!
I can understand why RP doesn't play Yes often - they are not an easy listen, the meaning of the lyrics is either undecipherable or at the least very obscure, and Jon Anderson's vocal style is pretty unusual.  But man/dude, their musical talent - both the composition and execution - is unmistakable!
 bindi wrote:
1971. . .it was just a few years earlier that "she loves you, yeah, yeah, yeah" was kind of cutting edge - and while the fab four proved themselves later, there were  those other bands that turned us onto little snippets of Jazz, Classical music and other worlds and mindsets  like Yes, Genesis and ELP.  I can understand people not getting them, but all the puking emoticons??  Maybe you are in the wrong place. As a kid, I was blown away the first time I heard Fragile - and I am still amazed how great an album it still is. 
 
You are so right! (and just ignore the crybabies who post that moronic puking emoticon)

Thanks Bill!!  Haven't heard this in a while.  Saw them in concert way back, and they were fabulous.

 bindi wrote:
1971. . .it was just a few years earlier that "she loves you, yeah, yeah, yeah" was kind of cutting edge - and while the fab four proved themselves later, there were  those other bands that turned us onto little snippets of Jazz, Classical music and other worlds and mindsets  like Yes, Genesis and ELP.  I can understand people not getting them, but all the puking emoticons??  Maybe you are in the wrong place. As a kid, I was blown away the first time I heard Fragile - and I am still amazed how great an album it still is. 
 
Tell the Moon-dog, tell the March-hare
We...have...heaven...

I guess you just had to be there. Glad I was!

1971. . .it was just a few years earlier that "she loves you, yeah, yeah, yeah" was kind of cutting edge - and while the fab four proved themselves later, there were  those other bands that turned us onto little snippets of Jazz, Classical music and other worlds and mindsets  like Yes, Genesis and ELP.  I can understand people not getting them, but all the puking emoticons??  Maybe you are in the wrong place. As a kid, I was blown away the first time I heard Fragile - and I am still amazed how great an album it still is. 
Um...Yes? No.
 posworld wrote:


They were about to go on tour when Anderson had a respiratory problem and they had to postpone the tour. Then the rest of the band decided to get the tour going again without him (don't know why) and hired a tribute band singer. I find it very lame that they would tour without the heart and soul of the band. They are all very talented musicians yet Anderson is largely responsible for their success and over-all sound. Anderson is recovered and doing mini solo tours at this time.
 
In the early-80s they toured for a while with a replacement singer - Trevor Horn - one of the members of The Buggles (the other member - Downes - also played keyboards on that tour). I saw them on that tour. It wasn't bad but it wasn't Anderson.

I recently saw a broadcast on satellite TV of one of their concerts from just a couple years ago. I was surprised at how well Anderson sounded on it but I think they were careful which selections they used. 

Given their many lineup changes over the years it is amazing how consistent they sound. Maybe not to quite the point of King Crimson, but getting there. 
 
Although I generally found the high-pitched singing style to be irritating and the frenzied instrumentals to be grating, I did see Yes in concert (New Haven, 1979). What was really annoying was that the singers really could not even remotely approach the notes they sing on the albums. Maybe time and age had intervened, but without the vocals being at least reasonable approximations of the upper ranges they were intending, the overall effect was not pleasing. How they might manage in 2010, I can only shudder to think.
And then! Oh, the noise! Oh, the noise! Noise! Noise! Noise!
That's one thing he hated! The NOISE! NOISE! NOISE! NOISE!
... 
all the Whos down in Who-ville cry BOO-HOO-HOO !!!....

-Dr. Seuss


One of the worst pieces of music on RP. Pointless.
Truly one of the best bands in Progressive Rock!


This guy (R.I.P.) loved this song...


 Propayne wrote:
Bruford!!!
 
Squire! Howe!

 westslope wrote:
What happened to Jon Anderson?
 

They were about to go on tour when Anderson had a respiratory problem and they had to postpone the tour. Then the rest of the band decided to get the tour going again without him (don't know why) and hired a tribute band singer. I find it very lame that they would tour without the heart and soul of the band. They are all very talented musicians yet Anderson is largely responsible for their success and over-all sound. Anderson is recovered and doing mini solo tours at this time.
What happened to Jon Anderson?
What a shame they cheesed out and are currently touring with a sound-alike replacement for the brilliant Jon Anderson.
No more Yes - I just can't take it! Awful!
 Saliby_Br wrote:
{#Puke}
 

In outer space, no one can hear you ralph...
{#Puke}
More Yes Please
It's a nice world when it's filled with Yes songs you don't (or can't) remember...

I'm a happy camper now {#Bananajam}
Bruford!!!
 SmileOnADog wrote:

I'll Amen that.
 
I double dog amen that!


Yessss, this song kicks assss...

 
Best bass and melotron intro anywhere....lol
 westslope wrote:

Could call. Yes might even be possibly a tad tighter than Zappa's band.  (Ducking....)
 
This is from 1971 after all, before Zappa really got his stride and was handing the Black Page to auditioning drummers.  Yes never really got any better than this.  Zappa, though, just kept getting better and better
 rtrudeau wrote:
No. This is what happens when prog gets excessive.
 
Kind of like a calculus lesson given by a screeching eunuch.  Not that there's anything wrong with that.


 yclept wrote:
yesyesyes   throw out the vocals, and you almost could mistake this for an arrangement by Frank Zappa
 
Good call. Yes might even be possibly a tad tighter than Zappa's band.  (Ducking....)


yesyesyes   throw out the vocals, and you almost could mistake this for an arrangement by Frank Zappa

Agreed.  This is the best cut of the LP.  

A tad bombastic and self-important?  Yes, perhaps.  Jon Anderson's voice actually seems to work in this song.  The writing is incredibly original.  And I hum along through the whole song!

 

Yes!


 grungepuppy wrote:


Calling this excessive is a bit like saying "Lebron James scored 50 points last night, which is excessive." If you've got it, flaunt it. These guys can jam and the music is incredible.{#Bananajam}

 
I'll Amen that.

Sooooooooo Sooo So nice!
 rtrudeau wrote:
No. This is what happens when prog gets excessive.
 

Calling this excessive is a bit like saying "Lebron James scored 50 points last night, which is excessive." If you've got it, flaunt it. These guys can jam and the music is incredible.{#Bananajam}

 rtrudeau wrote:
No. This is what happens when prog gets excessive.
 

amen!
 Propayne wrote:

Roger Dean is the cover artist. Check him out and you'll see where James Cameron got a lot of his ideas for the imagery in the "Avatar" movie.
 

Absolutely.  Avatarland felt like familiar territory thanks to the Yes cover art.

 

Enjoyed Avatar but wish it was not so misleading.  Corporations do not cleanse folks; governments cleanse folks.


OK, so I finally had to give someone a 10.  Oh well it had to happen sometime.

 ScottishWillie wrote:

Is it just me or dose anyone else see Avatar as an animated Yes album sleeve. I hope Roger Dean is getting royalties

 
No question about it.
https://io9.com/5426120/did-prog-rocks-greatest-artist-inspire-avatar-all-signs-point-to-yes/gallery/

Oh, okay, I still kinda like it.

Is it just me or dose anyone else see Avatar as an animated Yes album sleeve. I hope Roger Dean is getting royalties.


 dkwalika wrote:
I always thought it was the crack running through the earth on the cover. That earth is fragile.

Eveland wrote:

Why did they name this album Fragile?


 
Roger Dean is the cover artist. Check him out and you'll see where James Cameron got a lot of his ideas for the imagery in the "Avatar" movie.
I always thought it was the crack running through the earth on the cover. That earth is fragile.

Eveland wrote:

Why did they name this album Fragile?





how many crappy commercial stations would have listeners taking the time to write in with their diverse memories, opinions and perspectives (based on age as much as culture) about the music being played. This what RP is all about. Confronting us with stuff we forgot or never knew. Yes to the album cover. Never mad about the band though. More technique and heart.
 romeotuma wrote:


It feels so good to hear this song...  this is as good as it gets...  Yes— I love it...
 
Yes it is....... as good as it gets.

Love this album and I too am glad I still have this album which is in pristine condition.  {#Meditate}

Why did they name this album Fragile?


It's always refreshing to hear classical music....
Excellent!


It feels so good to hear this song...  this is as good as it gets...  Yes— I love it...
I've been to three incredible Yes concerts in my life, and to this day am as impressed as I was in the 70's and 80's!
No. This is what happens when prog gets excessive.
Now this is music!!!

this is one of the few albums that i kept when i made the change to CD

great album cover too

the first time i ever saw them was in either '72 or '73, they were an opening act for Peter Frampton and then later on Mountain in a soccer stadium in the Bronx, NY.  they played for 3 hours, did 3 encores, and basically kept Frampton and Mountain cooling their heels for a while.  they were easily the best of the 3 bands that played that concert.
I made a mixed cassette, back in the day: "Genesis? Yes, Floyd." Two hours focused on this and the Yes Album for them, Lamb and Trick of the Tail for Genesis, and Dark Side, Wish You Were Here, and Animals for Floyd. I gotta dig that up!
 martinc wrote:
Yes, King Crimson, McDonald Giles, ELP all great bands back then and I like hearing some of these in the RP mix. I blew the my Dads Grundig speakers that he brought from Germany on this song. It was not a happy day when he came home.
 
But it worth it wasn't it?
I love this song.  I always thought Mathematical music described Yes better than Progressive music, and this song and Perpetual Change are as mathematical as they come.  Mathematical music implies no - or limited - emotion, and I think that the perceived lack of emotional involvement in their music is why many people detest them and use excessive, bombastic, self-indulgent, etc. to describe their music.  But to me, this song and other Yes songs are very emotional - they frequently give me goose bumps because of their compositional and executional brilliance.

Yes, King Crimson, McDonald Giles, ELP all great bands back then and I like hearing some of these in the RP mix. I blew the my Dads Grundig speakers that he brought from Germany on this song. It was not a happy day when he came home.
 fredriley wrote:

Yep, agree with the last sentence. PT is much better than Yes in the same way that a back rub by a bevy of beauties (pick your sex) is better than being dangled by your nuts with cheesewire over a scorpion pit. Say No! to Yes!

 

Hey! Yes is still good value. I must beg to disagree.  Came to me at a time when I needed to run marathons with my brain.

 

This one is a tad bombastic but I like the build.  One of my favourites.  (Well, actually Relayer is the favourite CD.)


 h9xh9xh9x wrote:
Excellent choice! This song reminds me of what Paradise is all about.
 

Yes, this song is fantastic...


Like it or not, 70s prog rock played a critical part in opening doors to what a "rock group" could present to their audience, and contributed greatly to the sonic landscape of 21st century music.  All these debates about whether Yes or Porcupine Tree is better just amuse me.  Do you really think Porcupine Tree would be who they are, musically speaking, without Yes as forerunners?  Even if a later band improves upon a genre, you still gotta give props to the folks who were the original pioneers!
But I guess telling everyong how you really really really hate this band keeps you in your warm, fuzzy comfort zone.


I was in London can't remember the exact year and a friend took me to some club to see
some new group,,,Yes , it was mind blowin,,not that my mind needed more blowin those days.Some one help me here,,name of the Club?  M,,something? One # 1 spot 69 or 70
or later.
Long!
Distance!
To the end of this looooooooooooooooooong song

 h9xh9xh9x wrote:
Excellent choice! This song reminds me of what Paradise is all about.
 
I loved it as an impressionable youth and I still love it as a curious old lady. However, I no longer feel lost in the city unless I want to.  {#Sunny}

Thank God Kansas and Rush came along and saved me from this. Yes was something on the radio occasionally that always seemed to go on too long.
 F1 wrote:
Christ, make it stop.  This totally epitomizes the excesses and self-indulgences of that era.
 
What?!
excessive? Self indulgent? That is what all art is! pushing the envelope and/by indulging ones' creative impulses.
And you think F1 ISN'T self indulgent?

Go back to school. 
One of the few bands to be all of inspirational, cerebral, spiritual/emotional, and technically brilliant.
I got tired of Yes back in the day but its great to hear this again...
Yeesh, that Yorkshire tyke's still warbling away. Yes sure did write some prodigiously long tracks, some a whole side long. Paradise or purgatory depening on your viewpoint.

If Yes is the answer, IMO you're asking the wrong question.


This song is soooo awesome...  love it...


This always reminded me of Uncle Frank (zappa)....must be an influence.
{#Music}
 h9xh9xh9x wrote:
Excellent choice! This song reminds me of what Paradise is all about.
 

Agreed!
Love Yes!

 westslope wrote:

Absolutely.  Love Yes.   Believe Porcupine Tree is much better.

 
While the debate to which is better: PT or Yes, will undoubtably continue here, I'd rather be lost in a Roger Dean Fantasy than one of Lasse Hoile's. One is full of wonder and beauty. The other, death and destruction, introspection.

I love Yes and did as a young man. But PT is my mainstay. So I like PT more.

Much better? That's a stretch. Jon Anderson certainly sings better than Steven. But I think that PT weaves music more cohesively. At least currently.

Great Segue, Bill. But you already knew that, oh Mr. Goldsmith.

 bwanab wrote:
I wonder if any other song has such a pronounced barbell rating graph?
 
Most of The Smiths and Neil Young's work.
Now i remember that Rick Wakeman is the guy on synth. who does meditational music after Yes, and he went for that to India. .He is really good.

Nice segue from Porcupine Tree to this.  Amazing how much Steven Wilson sounds like Jon Anderson.
 fredriley wrote:

Yep, agree with the last sentence. PT is much better than Yes in the same way that a back rub by a bevy of beauties (pick your sex) is better than being dangled by your nuts with cheesewire over a scorpion pit. Say No! to Yes!

 

I envy your way with words, Fred.  Totally agree with ya, though.
That's easy for you to say!
inspirational song to hear cycling on a sun poisoning day to when just about to give up on hill in the middle of nowhere...least for me.
 fatcatjb wrote:
all the smart kidz grooved on this in high school
me and the gritty boyz stuck to the Stones 
 
in my high school some of us grooved to this and the Stones, sometimes even in the same day{#Guitarist}
{#Mrgreen}

Brings me back . . .
 Hairfarmer wrote:
11

No make that 12.
 

I concur...  this song is soooo good for the ears...


11

No make that 12.
This song ranged from being rather dull to progressively more and more hilarious until it finally started to annoy me. 

Reminds me of reading Omni magazine and cheap polyester clothes.
all the smart kidz grooved on this in high school
me and the gritty boyz stuck to the Stones 
 bwanab wrote:
I wonder if any other song has such a pronounced barbell rating graph?
 
guess not, to me its 10 points always been groovy to the max{#Clap} YES that isYES
I wonder if any other song has such a pronounced barbell rating graph?

Great album, great song. 10.


 fredriley wrote:

Yep, agree with the last sentence. PT is much better than Yes in the same way that a back rub by a bevy of beauties (pick your sex) is better than being dangled by your nuts with cheesewire over a scorpion pit. Say No! to Yes!

 
Now, this might have been a Yes album cover.

Saw Yes last year at the House of Blues. I was skeptical; they are old. But, they blew me away (well they had a little help!). Rick Wakeman's son subbed for him, and David Benoit from a Montreal Yes cover band replaced an ailing Anderson. Closed my eyes, and let the music take me back 35 years. Amazing. Yes, they played the entire album side!

Is this who 'Spinal Tap' wanted to be?
this may be the best there id
Aww common! This easily ranks up there with Spinal Tap's free-form jazz exploration phase!
 
 
 
F1 wrote:
Christ, make it stop.  This totally epitomizes the excesses and self-indulgences of that era.
 

 F1 wrote:
Christ, make it stop.  This totally epitomizes the excesses and self-indulgences of that era.
 
F1, your problem is trying to listen to this while sober!   {#Smile}
Bring on the excess. Say Yes to Yes!
 F1 wrote:
Christ, make it stop.  This totally epitomizes the excesses and self-indulgences of that era.
 
You make it sound like that's a bad thing!   {#Music}
Anyone see the animated show, "Stroker & Hoop" - the base line from this reminds me of the music during the opening credits. Rockin and hillarious.


 F1 wrote:
Christ, make it stop.  This totally epitomizes the excesses and self-indulgences of that era.
 
exactly.

 westslope wrote:

Absolutely.  Love Yes.   Believe Porcupine Tree is much better.

 
Yep, agree with the last sentence. PT is much better than Yes in the same way that a back rub by a bevy of beauties (pick your sex) is better than being dangled by your nuts with cheesewire over a scorpion pit. Say No! to Yes!

 Proclivities wrote:
Surprising that there's no commentary on how derivative this is from "21st Century Schizoid Man".
 
They were contemporaries - I could see how they might lift ideas from each other (and probably did).

 F1 wrote:
Christ, make it stop.  This totally epitomizes the excesses and self-indulgences of that era.
 
Wrong.
This is great.
You must be thinking of Styx' Mr. Roboto.

 F1 wrote:
Christ, make it stop.  This totally epitomizes the excesses and self-indulgences of that era.
 
Don't like it? Mute your audio. {#Tongue-out}
One of the best prog rock tunes ever! 
Surprising that there's no commentary on how derivative this is from "21st Century Schizoid Man".
 UltraNurd wrote:
Love this intro. Great transition from Porcupine Tree, clearly some influence there from Yes.
 
Absolutely.  Love Yes.   Believe Porcupine Tree is much better.

 F1 wrote:
Christ, make it stop.  This totally epitomizes the excesses and self-indulgences of that era.
 
True.  But I still love it. One of the best off the Fragile album.

I was hoping I would like this but it just meanders around too much. I do like Roundabout from this album.

Christ, make it stop.  This totally epitomizes the excesses and self-indulgences of that era.
 jlind wrote:
It's amazing how modern this song seems even 38 years later.
 
And I was just thinking how dated (synthgasm!) it sounds. The wonder of music and how it appeals differently to all! Glad you like this - I'm looking forward to the next song

Awesome.
Perhaps I would have appreciated Yes had that enlisted someone else as their singer. I find Jon Anderson to be too much to take—kind of like the Frankie Valli of his decade. A quick fade-out edit after the intro would suit me just fine, appealing to Rick Wakeman fans (me) without making us endure the remaining portion of this lengthy track.