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Bruce Springsteen — Rosalita (Come Out Tonight)
Album: The Wild, the Innocent, & the E Street Shuffle
Avg rating:
7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 944









Released: 1973
Length: 6:57
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Spread out now Rosie; Doctor come cut loose her mama's reins
You know playin' blind man's bluff is a little baby's game
You pick up Little Dynamite I'm gonna pick up Little Gun
And together we're gonna go out tonight and make that highway run
You don't have to call me lieutenant Rosie and I don't want to be your son
The only lover I'm ever gonna need's your soft sweet little girl's tongue
And Rosie you're the one

Dynamite's in the belfry playin' with the bats
Little Gun's downtown in front of Woolworth's tryin' out his attitude on all the cats
Papa's on the corner waitin' for the bus
Mama she's home in the window waitin' up for us
She'll be there in that chair when they wrestle her upstairs 'cause you know we ain't gonna come
I ain't here for business baby, I'm only here for fun
And Rosie you're the one

Rosalita jump a little lighter,
Senorita come sit by my fire
I just want to be your lover ain't no liar,
Rosalita you're my stone desire

Jack the Rabbit and Weak Knees Willie you know they're gonna be there
Ah Sloppy Sue and Big Bones Billie they'll be comin' up for air
We're gonna play some pool, skip some school, act real cool,
Stay out all night, it's gonna feel alright
So Rosie come out tonight, Oh baby come out tonight
Windows are for cheaters, chimneys for the poor
Closets are for hangers, winners use the door
So use it Rosie, that's what it's there for

Rosalita jump a little lighter,
Senorita come sit by my fire
I just want to be your lover ain't no liar,
Rosalita you're my stone desire

Now I know your mama she don't like me 'cause I play in a rock and roll band
And I know your daddy he don't dig me but he never did understand
Your papa lowered the boom he locked you in your room
I'm comin' to lend a hand
I'm comin' to liberate you, confiscate you, I want to be your man
Someday we'll look back on this and it will all seem funny
But now you're sad, your mama's mad
And your papa says he knows that I don't...
(...have any money)
Oh, your papa says he knows...
(...that I don't have any money)
Oh, so your daddy says he knows that I don't have...
(...any money)
Well, tell him this is last chance
To get his daughter in a fine romance
Because a record company Rosie just gave me a big advance

And my tires were slashed and I almost crashed but the Lord had mercy
And my machine she's a dud out stuck in the mud somewhere in the swamps of Jersey
Well, hold on tight, stay up all night 'cause Rosie I'm comin' on strong
By the time we meet the morning light I will hold you in my arms
I know a pretty little place in Southern California down San Diego way
There's a little cafe where they play guitars all night and all day
You can hear them in the back room strummin'
So hold tight baby 'cause don't you know daddy's comin'

Rosalita jump a little lighter,
Senorita come sit by my fire
I just want to be your lover ain't no liar,
Rosalita you're my stone desire
Comments (296)add comment
 wtango wrote:

Me too!  That would totally  be on my "time machine" bucket list!
He's The Best!
 
He came to the Decade in Oakland, near the PITT campus, after playing a concert at the Civic Arena in 1986.  Played three songs with Joe Grushecky .  Wasn't really into him, but that was one of those "glad I was there moments".
 MattRudely wrote:
Who the hell produced this? And what were they on? What a mess.


The Boss of what anyway. He who is in charge of going on and on interminably in one key, yelling a bit flat. Vastly overrated.
 
What planet are you from?
 nickferrante10 wrote:
I always imagine how great it would have been to see this song live in a small hot, sweaty club with the stage shaking to the beat and the whole place dancing.
 
Me too!  That would totally  be on my "time machine" bucket list!
He's The Best!
Hard to beat this! Remember haters, you were looking at another decade of fucking disco if not for Bruce and a few others. Bruce is the Boss because he brought rock & roll back from the dead.
Cranked up high on my new Computer speakers working from home.

Bruce is a much needed diversion from 2020. Reminds me of days from my past - 2019!!

A mess but a genious mess! "I know your mama dont like me cause i play in a R'nRoll band", i enjoy this so much.!
It'd be great if it was 2.5 minutes shorter.
 MattRudely wrote:
Who the hell produced this? And what were they on? What a mess.


The Boss of what anyway. He who is in charge of going on and on interminably in one key, yelling a bit flat. Vastly overrated.
 
It's what rock-n-roll sounds like to me. I prefer emotion to production value.
I always imagine how great it would have been to see this song live in a small hot, sweaty club with the stage shaking to the beat and the whole place dancing.
Who the hell produced this? And what were they on? What a mess.


The Boss of what anyway. He who is in charge of going on and on interminably in one key, yelling a bit flat. Vastly overrated.
Godlike!  Can't believe this is the only song from The Wild, the Innocent and the E-street Shuffle on RP.
I know this guy is talented and has written some beautiful songs, but this one makes me hit the mute button every time it is played.  I really can't stand it.
I'm paralyzed. I have no feeling from the hair down. Make the bad man stop!
I listened to a recent interview with Clarence Clemons on CBC. He said that his first impression of Bruce was that he saw greatness...he saw greatness in his eyes. In his words, "It was like following Jesus. Quit everything you are doing and come with me because this is important for both of us."

He also spoke about first meeting Bruce. Bruce was playing in a bar, when Clarence went to see him there was a major storm happening; thunder, lightning and wind. He opened the door and it blew off the hinges and down the street...there he stood in the doorway framed by lightning and thunder. One hell of an entrance! {#Roflol}

 WayUpNorth wrote:
You must be from the ritzy burbs of jersey otherwise you would identify with this at some level.  It doesn't have much snob appeal.

 

Had to tell this story after I read WayUpNorth's comment.  I worked as an au pair (read: criminally underpaid live-in babysitter) in the ritzy northern NJ suburbs in the late 1980's.  The father was an uber-snob; he was haughty and superior to those he felt were beneath him (read: me, the criminally underpaid live-in babysitter, and most everyone else too).  One day at dinner, he told the story of how he was driving around "South Jersey" and saw all of these bumper stickers that said "Springsteen".  He thought it was a lumber company or some such "working class" thing.  Then he found out it was Bruuuuce.  To repeat: he lived in New Jersey.  In 1987.  How snobby and living under a rock can you be?  He related this like it was a badge of honor that he did not recognize a purveyor of such an inferior music style that the underclass listened to.  His attitude (and the criminal underpayment) made me last only a few months in that job.  And it made me like Springsteen that much more!
 Neil66 wrote:
please stop it... on & on & on & on, relentless droning,....

 

I don't get it either!!!! Drivel, shouting & moaning
 raga wrote:
MUTE
 
Agreed ....
This site usually steers clear of over-hyped media created icons.

 raga wrote:
MUTE
 
Stop the shouting & screaming!! Mute & mute.

Not a big Bruce fan, but he has a handful of excellent bootie shakin tunes and this be one of em!{#Dancingbanana}
 pdjpirate wrote:

I here you with your call of the wild. Not crazy about Bruce's politics, but his songs/lyrics represent a slice of Americana, and his live shows rock with the best of them!
 
I generally ignore the politics of entertainers . . . but I'd have to say that his lyrics _used_ to be a nice slice of Americana. For the past ten years or so, they just seem like the sort of things that would be handed in for a comp lit class. I've had to grade way too many of those papers and would welcome the sort of nimble and vigorous lyrics that Bruce put out for his first couple albums.

 WayUpNorth wrote:
You must be from the ritzy burbs of jersey otherwise you would identify with this at some level.  It doesn't have much snob appeal.

 


I here you with your call of the wild. Not crazy about Bruce's politics, but his songs/lyrics represent a slice of Americana, and his live shows rock with the best of them!
Chair dancin'!
 bobringer wrote:
Well... It doesn't get much worse than this, does it now?
 You must be from the ritzy burbs of jersey otherwise you would identify with this at some level.  It doesn't have much snob appeal.

MUTE
You know, Bruce isn't one of my favorite performers, and I've heard this song about 8 million times, and there's nothing profound in the lyrics, but it just hits all the right buttons anyway.  WOOHOO!

PARTY PARTY PARTY!{#Dancingbanana}
 dedawson wrote:
I don't know.  Heard lots of Springsteen over the years but, for me at least, its just so much warm beer; not really satisfying and makes me want to take a nap{#Yawn}.
 
And this from a person who chooses to live in the land of a thousand jokes!   Go back to sleep, we'll enjoy!!

 bobringer wrote:
Well... It doesn't get much worse than this, does it now?
 
Are you referring to your comment, or the song?

 bobringer wrote:
Well... It doesn't get much worse than this, does it now?
 

Sure it does, you've heard "Born in the U.S.A." haven't you?
 rah wrote:
made of 100% awesome.
 
With wholesome ingredients like talent, musicianship, blood, sweat and tears. {#Chef}
 bobringer wrote:
Well... It doesn't get much worse than this, does it now?
 
or much better, depending on who's doing the listening. Back to college for me, with this one {#Dancingbanana}
Desk Dancing!!{#Dancingbanana}
Well... It doesn't get much worse than this, does it now?
They closed out one of last month's shows in LA with Rosalita!

 ArbiterOfGoodTaste wrote:

 
bpkengor wrote:
I only went to 4 or 5 Springsteen shows, hoping for Rosalita at each one.   He never came through.  he seemed to have a period where he had lost interest in that song.    but i still get it...
 
Hopefully this can suffice for a little while: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WL25NcSIgM

 

made of 100% awesome.
what a boor
please stop it... on & on & on & on, relentless droning,....

Bruce is a one-of-a-kind legend.
He is a force of nature.
He's no geniuis, just a Genius.
Wah-hooo!!!!!!!
 greyfin10 wrote:

I know I wasn't specifically addressed in this, but as I a) hear what you are describing and b) have never been a big Springsteen fan, it hit home anyway ;).  I hear the fun.  Strange thing is that I AM old... I almost wonder if I hear some sorts of youthful joy more clearly now that I'm just realizing I'm not young anymore...  hmm.

 djengs wrote:

You know, this just embodies teenage fun. If you didn't get it at the time (or still don't), I am really sorry. You are just too old, no matter your age. Picking at technical elements or style is useless, because it transcends that. It is just fun, and that is all it was ever meant to be. If you saw the guy play live back then, you would understand. He just loved playing rock and roll, and had a band that backed him 100%. I think he would win over an arena of hip-hop ganstas if you time-tripped him to now, just because it was so infectious, and so few are able to communicate fun as well live, much less record it. So, don't compare this to the tired guy doing the Today show- same guy but a fabulous performer in his time and a truly gifted songwriter well beyond those early days.
 
 
Well put! {#Clap}


 
bpkengor wrote:
I only went to 4 or 5 Springsteen shows, hoping for Rosalita at each one.   He never came through.  he seemed to have a period where he had lost interest in that song.    but i still get it...
 
Hopefully this can suffice for a little while: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WL25NcSIgM

Did I mention that this sucks?
Hell yeah! Thanks Bill, you're helping with my hangover. {#Curtain} Great stuff from back when Bruce still had to try.

 nagsheadlocal wrote:

Actually, I find that his later lyrics all sound like the sort of essays you'd find in a bad comp-lit class (and I've had to grade way more than my share of those).

But his first three, maybe four, albums were pretty much the pinnacle of American rock in the early 70s.


 
And I'm glad he was there to save rock in those early seventies.
The radio scene was truly horrible back then.

The evocative lyrics, joviality and sheer momentum of this song propelled Bruce straight thru Born To Run. Unfortunately, he crashed landed after that. But momentum is hard to stop, content or not.

I don't know.  Heard lots of Springsteen over the years but, for me at least, its just so much warm beer; not really satisfying and makes me want to take a nap{#Yawn}.
 linden wrote:
Ten pounds of song in a four-pound sack!
 

If by song you meant something else, then yes, indeed.
Positively frenentic.{#Crashcomp}
 Quixmundi wrote:
Earlier albums were ok, but his later efforts sound alike to me. Lots of common man angst anthems from a guy who lives very well in California these days.
 
Actually, I find that his later lyrics all sound like the sort of essays you'd find in a bad comp-lit class (and I've had to grade way more than my share of those).

But his first three, maybe four, albums were pretty much the pinnacle of American rock in the early 70s.


One of my all-time faves.
 Quixmundi wrote:
He was asked why he chose to play the Super Bowl this year, answering "Man, I gotta new CD to plug." Ah yes, Mr. Everyman.
  Hey, I admire him for still workin' so hard, at his age.
I've tried to listen but still don't get how Bruce commands such adoration. Earlier albums were ok, but his later efforts sound alike to me. Lots of common man angst anthems from a guy who lives very well in California these days. He was asked why he chose to play the Super Bowl this year, answering "Man, I gotta new CD to plug." Ah yes, Mr. Everyman.
 bpkengor wrote:

I only went to 4 or 5 Springsteen shows, hoping for Rosalita at each one.   He never came through.  he seemed to have a period where he had lost interest in that song.    but i still get it...

 

I saw Bruce on the Born In The USA tour and his encore was Rosalita. It was one of the most exciting, andrenaline filled, driving, climactic song performances I have ever seen. I had a huge amount of respect for Bruce as a live performer after that.

loved Bruce when he was in his drinkin' , smokin' , groovin' days.
glory days, long time gone....


My favorite Bruce song.  Unfortunately it does not include my favorite Bruce lyric, which comes from Jungleland:

"Barefoot girl sittin' on the hood of a Dodge drinkin' warm beer in the soft summer rain."
 

I know I wasn't specifically addressed in this, but as I a) hear what you are describing and b) have never been a big Springsteen fan, it hit home anyway ;).  I hear the fun.  Strange thing is that I AM old... I almost wonder if I hear some sorts of youthful joy more clearly now that I'm just realizing I'm not young anymore...  hmm.

 djengs wrote:

You know, this just embodies teenage fun. If you didn't get it at the time (or still don't), I am really sorry. You are just too old, no matter your age. Picking at technical elements or style is useless, because it transcends that. It is just fun, and that is all it was ever meant to be. If you saw the guy play live back then, you would understand. He just loved playing rock and roll, and had a band that backed him 100%. I think he would win over an arena of hip-hop ganstas if you time-tripped him to now, just because it was so infectious, and so few are able to communicate fun as well live, much less record it. So, don't compare this to the tired guy doing the Today show- same guy but a fabulous performer in his time and a truly gifted songwriter well beyond those early days.
 
You know, this just embodies teenage fun. If you didn't get it at the time (or still don't), I am really sorry. You are just too old, no matter your age. Picking at technical elements or style is useless, because it transcends that. It is just fun, and that is all it was ever meant to be. If you saw the guy play live back then, you would understand. He just loved playing rock and roll, and had a band that backed him 100%. I think he would win over an arena of hip-hop ganstas if you time-tripped him to now, just because it was so infectious, and so few are able to communicate fun as well live, much less record it. So, don't compare this to the tired guy doing the Today show- same guy but a fabulous performer in his time and a truly gifted songwriter well beyond those early days.
 twcarlin wrote:
Said this before and will say it again- the first 3 albums by Bruce were as close to rock perfection as you will hear- heartfelt, soulful, with lyrics and melodies that speak to people of a certain age and social experience. You can argue that his later stuff was either too commercial or too self serving, but to listening to Greetings from Asbury Park, The wild, the innocent and the E-street shuffle and Born to run is to gain a glimpse into the soul of 80's NJ life.
 
yes, yes and yes.

and youse guys what wanna pick on my mutha's homestate of new joisey ... go back to santa cruz, or whatever other freekin' rock youse crawled out from unduh. 

What a good way to end a work week!! (I work nights). The people in the next office have on a country morning radio show.  Ooooh I just blasted it to drown them out!
It goes on and on and on, and it's a effing awful irritating noise
No. And would someone please break that bloody sax? This is a pain that seems to last forever...

 manchester1 wrote:
I've lived in Joisey now for 3 years -
Maybe it was different years ago, but today people here are the most: (1)rude, (2)selfish, (3)impatient, (4)poor drivers, and (4)loud humans I have ever encountered.

However, it is remarkable to think how many significant musicians have come from this state.

Great song and deep-felt lyrics. He tells stories but also grips you with the melody. That is why I enjoy Mr. Springsteen so much....
 

WELCOME to the east coast!  Jersey ( i was imprisoned there for ten years!) encapsulates the right coast, annoying, rude, full of crapp, but beneath the hype, and the mud, beautiful, crazy and warm...just dig deeper in them and yourself, i see mr springsteen helped mr obama carry the day.....God Bless them both, they have much work ahead of them.....{#Yes} btw if you think jersey is bad, go to new yawk!! and boston is certified to have the worlds worst drivers....

 linden wrote:
Ten pounds of song in a four-pound sack!
 
Excellent observation, nice image, thanks!


MediaGrrl wrote:
Finally, after seeing maybe 13 live shows over the last 20 years, I got to hear Rosalita live. Emirates Stadium, London, possibly the worst sound I've heard for an outdoor show in ages, and this girl went nuts. For 4 and half minutes I was delirious. And I know I'm setting someone up to say, no, for 20 years you've been delirious, but damn, see Bruce live and you just get it.
"... and your Papa says he knows that I don't have any money..."


I only went to 4 or 5 Springsteen shows, hoping for Rosalita at each one.   He never came through.  he seemed to have a period where he had lost interest in that song.    but i still get it...

To the "jazzed up" comment, the E-Street band drummer for the first 2 albums and the Born to Run single (not the rest of the album) was (and maybe still is), a talented jazz-style drummer. You will likely note that everything from those early days has complex, syncopated drums. So "jazzed up" is pretty much right on the mark. After that, the drumming (live and recorded) is powerful, but standard rock fair.

 
 linden wrote:
Ten pounds of song in a four-pound sack!
 

i'll say...the sound is full, rich, busy and stil blue collared; this is like the Big Mac of seventies american music
 MediaGrrl wrote:
damn, see Bruce live and you just get it.
 
From the first time I heard him on the radio—around '76—until BJ took me to a "Born in the USA" concert in Detroit in 1984, I didn't see the big deal. After that concert, I did. MediaGrrl's so dead on: you just get it.

Ten pounds of song in a four-pound sack!
Finally, after seeing maybe 13 live shows over the last 20 years, I got to hear Rosalita live. Emirates Stadium, London, possibly the worst sound I've heard for an outdoor show in ages, and this girl went nuts. For 4 and half minutes I was delirious. And I know I'm setting someone up to say, no, for 20 years you've been delirious, but damn, see Bruce live and you just get it.
"... and your Papa says he knows that I don't have any money..."

 

manchester1 wrote:
However, it is remarkable to think how many significant musicians have come from gotten the hell out of this state.
Fixed.
soooooooo played, move on brucie!!
OldFrenchie wrote:
Owie. That was not a graceful transition from Rob Costlow. Nice songs, both, but wow, that gave me a jolt.
Another Costlow:Springsteen segue again tonight. Quite snapped me out of what I was doing. Brilliant tune though! Ahhh- a full and fun misspent "yoot".
I've lived in Joisey now for 3 years - Maybe it was different years ago, but today people here are the most: (1)rude, (2)selfish, (3)impatient, (4)poor drivers, and (4)loud humans I have ever encountered. :evil: However, it is remarkable to think how many significant musicians have come from this state. Great song and deep-felt lyrics. He tells stories but also grips you with the melody. That is why I enjoy Mr. Springsteen so much.... :yes:
tzzart wrote:
Can't take the Boss. Too overproduced for me. :frustrated:
Overproduced? This one? This (and Greetings from Asbury Park) was the raw Springsteen, and this song may have been the most raw of them all.
Geecheeboy wrote:
Having been a fan of BS for some 30 years, it only just now occurs to me that his music actually sounds like jazzed-up, hands in the air, show tunes. And I mean that in the best possible way, as a matter of surprised realization.
Very true...especially if you listen to any of the shows from this era, really through the Born to Run Tour...
Having been a fan of BS for some 30 years, it only just now occurs to me that his music actually sounds like jazzed-up, hands in the air, show tunes. And I mean that in the best possible way, as a matter of surprised realization.
twcarlin wrote:
Said this before and will say it again- the first 3 albums by Bruce were as close to rock perfection as you will hear- heartfelt, soulful, with lyrics and melodies that speak to people of a certain age and social experience. You can argue that his later stuff was either too commercial or too self serving, but to listening to Greetings from Asbury Park, The wild, the innocent and the E-street shuffle and Born to run is to gain a glimpse into the soul of 80's NJ life.
Totally agree that these were his best, but the 3rd, Born to Run, came out in '75, I think. I remember playing and playing my vinyl LP in the place I lived 73-76... (not NJ)
Art_Carnage wrote:
People talk about Dylan, but Springsteen is the master of the unintelligible lyric. 4 minutes and 12 seconds of mumbling gibberish.
You can remove your earplugs, the aircraft has landed. :biggrin:
jdbaldwin wrote:
Does anyone else hear shades (and maybe more than shade) of "Blinded by the Light" in this?
man, i thought that, then i came here, and i guess someone thought it first.
jdbaldwin wrote:
Does anyone else hear shades (and maybe more than shade) of "Blinded by the Light" in this?
Probably, he wrote it.
MidLyfe wrote:
Maybe its because I'm not blue collar, maybe it's because I never drove a Trans Am to the river. Maybe its because I like Porcupine Tree, I don't know. But Bruce Springsteen never lit a fire for me musically. Not a hater, just a contemplater... :meditate:
Ditto
Does anyone else hear shades (and maybe more than shade) of "Blinded by the Light" in this?
Like all of us, Rosalita got older. I hear she now makes some damn good refried beans in a factory outside Newark.
Said this before and will say it again- the first 3 albums by Bruce were as close to rock perfection as you will hear- heartfelt, soulful, with lyrics and melodies that speak to people of a certain age and social experience. You can argue that his later stuff was either too commercial or too self serving, but to listening to Greetings from Asbury Park, The wild, the innocent and the E-street shuffle and Born to run is to gain a glimpse into the soul of 80's NJ life.
Owie. That was not a graceful transition from Rob Costlow. Nice songs, both, but wow, that gave me a jolt.
bitbanger wrote:
True, true. I spent the summer after my high school graduation in Wildwood NJ, working on the boards, when this album was out. Kept the thing spinning until the needle wore through the grooves! It was like we were living the songs on the album. Unfortunately, IMHO, Springsteen never again achieved the consistent passion and poignancy of effort in his later works. I have a feeling that the Wild & the Innocent and the Ashbury Park albums were about events and people that he knew on a very immediate basis, prior to becoming a mega-star with the consequent experiential isolation from the rest of us slobs.
I too am from NJ(East Brunswick-8 miles from Freehold)When I went to Trenton State everyone was playing "Greetings from Asbury Park"Bruce was the biggest thing to hit NJ since Sinatra(no shit).I never did like stars that were "too popular"....always liked the more "obscure" music I heard in NYC.I respected him as an artist.Way to go kid....you made it out of Freehold!
Marvellous song :guitarist: I'd just sent my wife the link to listen in and this was one of the first songs she heard. As she uses the name DJ-Rosalita when she DJs it was rather apt ! Yet more psychic programming from RP ! :yes:
Art_Carnage wrote:
People talk about Dylan, but Springsteen is the master of the unintelligible lyric. 4 minutes and 12 seconds of mumbling gibberish.
Hmm, I think I can make out every word of this one. And they're grrrreat!
MidLyfe wrote:
Maybe its because I'm not blue collar, maybe it's because I never drove a Trans Am to the river. Maybe its because I like Porcupine Tree, I don't know. But Bruce Springsteen never lit a fire for me musically. Not a hater, just a contemplater... :meditate:
Bruce is a strange one for me. I was never a fan of his music, ever. But my brother bought tickets and we went to see him. Sat in a line for 6 or 7 hours, got a good seat. And it's still the best concert I ever saw. But I go back home, put the music on, and it just doesn't hit me as hard. This era of Bruce in particular reminds me of Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem. I LOVE his song Jungle Land though. ^_^
People talk about Dylan, but Springsteen is the master of the unintelligible lyric. 6 minutes and 57 seconds of mumbling gibberish.
jbyrd13 wrote:
Fact: This album cover won him the 'Best Mustache' award shortly after it's release.
It's really not so much about the teenage mustache, it's about the gut! It's about middle America before the "Super Highway" goes through this great continent and calls it one!!! (Vicente'Fox, George Bush, and the Prime Minister of Canada at the Bush ranch, 2005.)
My God, this sucks.
MidLyfe wrote:
Maybe its because I'm not blue collar, maybe it's because I never drove a Trans Am to the river. Maybe its because I like Porcupine Tree, I don't know. But Bruce Springsteen never lit a fire for me musically. Not a hater, just a contemplater... :meditate:
Yes. Well said. :ask:
Maybe its because I'm not blue collar, maybe it's because I never drove a Trans Am to the river. Maybe its because I like Porcupine Tree, I don't know. But Bruce Springsteen never lit a fire for me musically. Not a hater, just a contemplater... :meditate:
eh......
Fact: This album cover won him the 'Best Mustache' award shortly after it's release.
raga wrote:
BASTA!!! STOP!!! BASTA!!!
Ditto, I wish this guy would retire and get a real job!
bmcgrath wrote:
Clearly the best live performer because he provides his fans with a fantastic three to four hour concert with high energy from start to finish. The best!
Add Prince to your list of best live performer!
BASTA!!! STOP!!! BASTA!!!
MM13 wrote:
That's what music can do. But what had you been up to? Racing in the streets?
Rainy night, curvy road, Kharmann Ghia. Crumpled like a gum wrapper. No seat belts.
MM13 wrote:
Anyone who ever saw him playing this song live, would instantly reward it with a 9, like I did. Sweat and tears, and that was just from the audience's point of view
Absolutely. I hate to rate this an 8, because the live version is so iconic. But, this is only the studio version.
Clearly the best live performer because he provides his fans with a fantastic three to four hour concert with high energy from start to finish. The best!
...there's a similar vibe between early springsteen and the alarm which i'd never recognised before...
I find this song annoying.
skooney wrote:
If you grew up in the NY NJ metro area during the 60s 70s you would understand this song. I'm not a fanatic Springsteen fan, but this album and particularly this song captures the feeling and the energy of that time and place. For me it is an amazing piece of music.
Even if you didn't grow up there, the song paints the picture very vividly. That is why his early work is so amazing.
Overrated. Yeah, I said it. I'll say it again, too.
Listened to too much Bruce in high school. I still haven't gotten over it enough to listen to any more.
skooney wrote:
If you grew up in the NY NJ metro area during the 60s 70s you would understand this song. I'm not a fanatic Springsteen fan, but this album and particularly this song captures the feeling and the energy of that time and place. For me it is an amazing piece of music.
True, true. I spent the summer after my high school graduation in Wildwood NJ, working on the boards, when this album was out. Kept the thing spinning until the needle wore through the grooves! It was like we were living the songs on the album. Unfortunately, IMHO, Springsteen never again achieved the consistent passion and poignancy of effort in his later works. I have a feeling that the Wild & the Innocent and the Ashbury Park albums were about events and people that he knew on a very immediate basis, prior to becoming a mega-star with the consequent experiential isolation from the rest of us slobs.
pannaramma wrote:
This came out while I was recovering from a pretty nasty accident. You'd think it would bring back bad memories but this album made me feel like I might come back to life. I remember bopping around my parent's kitchen high on percocet and smoking Marlboros with my broken jaws wired shut - front teeth missing.
That's what music can do. But what had you been up to? Racing in the streets?
This came out while I was recovering from a pretty nasty accident. You'd think it would bring back bad memories but this album made me feel like I might come back to life. I remember bopping around my parent's kitchen high on percocet and smoking Marlboros with my broken jaws wired shut - front teeth missing.
MM13 wrote:
Anyone who ever saw him playing this song live, would instantly reward it with a 9, like I did. Sweat and tears, and that was just from the audience's point of view
I agree totally. I don't like all his stuff, but I saw him do this in a small venue in Charlotte in late '76 or early '77. The place had never had a rocker before. We were standing in the seats and dancing in the aisles. Great show!
Anyone who ever saw him playing this song live, would instantly reward it with a 9, like I did. Sweat and tears, and that was just from the audience's point of view
Hannio wrote:
7.3 is pretty lackluster around here.
:think: I don't agree at all. 7 is the magic number showing general enthusiasm around here. Most of the songs Bill plays are in the 7 range, showing he knows what we his listening audience likes to hear.
If you grew up in the NY NJ metro area during the 60s 70s you would understand this song. I'm not a fanatic Springsteen fan, but this album and particularly this song captures the feeling and the energy of that time and place. For me it is an amazing piece of music.
Paul_in_Australia wrote:
Rock by numbers. Any more formulaic and it would be categorised under 'algebra'. Where's the soul?
Not innovative, soulful, and meaningful like T-Rex and Jeepster, huh? :lol:
aronson wrote:
In comparison... "Brandy (You're a Fine Girl)" is an 11.
That boy ain't right
Now, I know your mama, she don't like me, 'cause I play in a rock and roll band And I know your daddy, he don't dig me, but he never did understand :wink:
Odyzzeuz wrote:
Awful. The single most overrated performer in the universe.
you said it perfectly, I just don't get it... :beat:
Awful. The single most overrated performer in the universe.
:bananajam: :bananapiano: :clap: