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Patti Smith — Jubilee
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Total ratings: 53









Released: 0
Length: 4:34
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It's Patti
https://www.jubileeusa.org/ I googled jubilee and that's one of the first things that came up. Something to do with debt relief. Seems like a good idea. I like this song and I like the message. Sounds like Patti's got her head screwed on straight. I met Patti once. She said I looked like a journalist, I guess because I was wearing a suit. I was at my brother's wedding though, so it wasn't that out of context to be wearing a suit.
I was lucky enough to see Patty live in front of the Washington Monument a couple of years ago at huge Anti-war Protest just before the war began. Stood less than 30 feet in front of the stage with 100,000 other folks around me , all of us braving the piercing cold Washington weather. Let me tell you, this woman is wonderful. Her views on the world, as well as her music are exemplary. Patty cranks. Always has, always will.
GolfRomeo wrote:
Yeah, she actually quit the music scene to RAISE HER KIDS. Can you imagine? Someone actually putting little kids ahead of their career? God bless her. She still slams.
hahahahaha. this whole comment made me giggle my little bean ass off. thanks. also, me no likey.
rgj13 wrote:
I'm inclined to agree, more or less, with that general assessment of punk, but can't agree at all with that assessment of country--at least, not of older, truer country, which is rock's twin sybling. Both were spawned by the blues, and country took up, in my mind, the affiliation of the blues with the much older tradition of lyric poetry. It could still be every bit as dark, and every bit as unsentimental, as the most anarchic punk song. Not that "contemporary" country, which is just pop with an accent, has anything to do with any of that.
Here's some punk attitude from Faron Young. Who, incidentally, took his own life about 10 years ago. Faron Young wrote:
I wanna live fast love hard die young and leave a beautiful memory Don't want slow walkin' or sad singin' let 'em have a jubilee I wanna leave a lot of happy women a thinking pretty thoughts of me I wanna live fast love hard die young and leave a beautiful memory I got a hot-rod car and a cowboy suit and I really do get around I got a little black book and the gals look cute and I know the name of every spot in town I wanna find 'em fool 'em leave 'em and let 'em do the same to me < steel - fiddle > ... Now you may not approve of the things I do but it really don't bother me But don't ever think you can tie me down I'm gonna stay footloose and fancy free So jump back make tracks move out and let the pretty gals at me I wanna live fast love hard die young and leave a beautiful memory
ksb wrote:
Well if you're going to call Nick Lowe and Johnny Cash punk, then you can pretty much say anything you like. From my view, punk wasn't about listening closely. Punk was about rebellion and anti-sentimentality in the extreme. Country has always been about comfort and nostalgia. They are, at their core, polar opposites. Perhaps then, you're right. It isn't new that 'punks' are now country, because they were folk all along.
Just in case someone's not "up" on their Nick: entertainment.msn.com wrote:
Nick Lowe held considerable influence over the development of punk rock. With the Brinsleys, Lowe began a back-to-basics movement that flowered into punk rock in the late '70s. As the house producer for Stiff, he recorded many seminal records by the likes of the Damned, Elvis Costello, and the Pretenders. His rough, ragged production style earned him the nickname "Basher" and also established the amateurish, D.I.Y. aesthetics of punk. Despite his massive influence on punk rock, Lowe never really was a punk rocker.
ksb wrote:
...From my view, punk wasn't about listening closely. Punk was about rebellion and anti-sentimentality in the extreme. Country has always been about comfort and nostalgia. They are, at their core, polar opposites. ...
I'm inclined to agree, more or less, with that general assessment of punk, but can't agree at all with that assessment of country--at least, not of older, truer country, which is rock's twin sybling. Both were spawned by the blues, and country took up, in my mind, the affiliation of the blues with the much older tradition of lyric poetry. It could still be every bit as dark, and every bit as unsentimental, as the most anarchic punk song. Not that "contemporary" country, which is just pop with an accent, has anything to do with any of that.
Thanks to GolfRomeo and ScottfromWyoming for enlightening me about Patti. I have always thought she rocked, but lost track of her when she quit to raise kids. Now, I admire her even more!
ScottFromWyoming wrote: Yeah, she actually quit the music scene to RAISE HER KIDS. Can you imagine? Someone actually putting little kids ahead of their career? God bless her. She still slams.
And if Johnny Cash wsn't punk before there was punk... well, he's post-punk for sure now, and I think he might have made one or two country records... " Johnny Cash is pretty much post-everything now, come to think of it. Except for a lot of good tunes that can roll for years to come and be called a lot of different things
Cavedragon wrote:
Maybe you didn't listen closely enough?John Doe and Exene Cervenka from X, Dave & Phil Alvin from the Blasters, Mike Ness from Social D, even Nick Lowe and Graham Parker were all considered punks, back in the day... and you could make an argument that they've all made "country " music since. And if Johnny Cash wsn't punk before there was punk... well, he's post-punk for sure now, and I think he might have made one or two country records... All punk ever was was putting the music back in the hands of the artists, and trying to take it away from the suits... which it seems to me contemporary "country' music needs to do. It's a format now, not a kind of music. A hearty bravo to those who buck the trends!
Well if you're going to call Nick Lowe and Johnny Cash punk, then you can pretty much say anything you like. From my view, punk wasn't about listening closely. Punk was about rebellion and anti-sentimentality in the extreme. Country has always been about comfort and nostalgia. They are, at their core, polar opposites. Perhaps then, you're right. It isn't new that 'punks' are now country, because they were folk all along.
Anybody listen to the words? Brave poetry in dangerous times. Let freedom ring! Oh glad day to celebrate ‘Neath the cloudless sky Air so sweet Water pure Fields ripe with rye Come one, come all Gather round Discard your Sunday shoes Come on now Oh my land Be a jubilee Come on girl Come on boy Be a jubilee Oh my land Oh my good People don’t be shy Weave the birth of harmony With children’s happy cries Hand in hand We’re dancing around In a freedom ring Come on now Oh my land Be a jubilee Come on girl Come on boy Be a jubilee We will never fade away Doves shall multiply Yet I see hawks circling the sky Scattering our glad day With debt and despair What good hour Will restore our troubled air? Come on people Gather round You know what to do Come on people Oh my land What be troubling Oh my land What be troubling What be troubling What be troubling you We are love and the future We stand in the midst of fury and weariness Who dreams of joy and radiance? Who dreams of war and sacrifice? Our sacred realms are being squeezed Curtailing civil liberties Recruit the dreams that sing to thee Let freedom ring Freedom ring Freedom ring Jubilee Oh my land Oh glad day Oh my land Hear our cry Freedom ring Oh glad day Oh my land Jubilee Jubilee
ksb wrote:
Crazy. I never would have guessed that when the punks grew older they would have become country muscians. Smith isn't the only one who's done this.
Maybe you didn't listen closely enough?John Doe and Exene Cervenka from X, Dave & Phil Alvin from the Blasters, Mike Ness from Social D, even Nick Lowe and Graham Parker were all considered punks, back in the day... and you could make an argument that they've all made "country " music since. And if Johnny Cash wsn't punk before there was punk... well, he's post-punk for sure now, and I think he might have made one or two country records... All punk ever was was putting the music back in the hands of the artists, and trying to take it away from the suits... which it seems to me contemporary "country' music needs to do. It's a format now, not a kind of music. A hearty bravo to those who buck the trends!
Pyro wrote:
Wasn't there a Patti Smith around in the mid seventies? (She may have spelled her name differently) Gilda Radner did a great sketch on her on SNL. Is this the same woman? I think not, but looking for feedback.
Yes, it's her.
Wasn't there a Patti Smith around in the mid seventies? (She may have spelled her name differently) Gilda Radner did a great sketch on her on SNL. Is this the same woman? I think not, but looking for feedback.
rls wrote:
Sounds like it to me, too. She didn't change Patti to Patty, did she?
no, someone just went to the trouble to upload a song and didn't bother to type the name right.
lolitampeg wrote:
be a jew bully, that what im getting?
Sounds like it to me, too. She didn't change Patti to Patty, did she?
Awful. through and through.
be a jew bully, that what im getting?
Lycophrog wrote:
I used to really like her but this sucks. Boring and bland. No creativity whatsoever.
This is grade C Patty at best, but creativity still runs wildly, if a bit under the radar in this case. I imagine some Newcastle or Bass would help my appreciation of this.
Crazy. I never would have guessed that when the punks grew older they would have become country muscians. Smith isn't the only one who's done this.
Darkmatter wrote:
Bah, what is up with all this negativity? :p The first lady of punk rock proves she can still make some noise. And some good noise to boot. I like! :)
Agreed!
Bah, what is up with all this negativity? :p The first lady of punk rock proves she can still make some noise. And some good noise to boot. I like! :)
This is junk
I used to really like her but this sucks. Boring and bland. No creativity whatsoever.
Better than most Patty Smith but not what I would call good.