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Miles Davis — Nature Boy
Album: Blue Moods
Avg rating:
8.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1211









Released: 1955
Length: 6:14
Plays (last 30 days): 0
(Instrumental)
Comments (254)add comment
Godlike  (the colors of the album work on my mood too, now so influenced I'll arrange a painting  : )  woo-hoo
{#Meditate}{#Notworthy} Cool as a cucumber! {#Chillpill}
 coloradojohn wrote:
Man, that sure is some smooth stuff! Can't go wrong with that period. Miles, Coltrane, Evans, Blakey, Mingus, Gillespie were JAZZIN it.

 
yeah the mid 50's thru the early 60's were my favorite times 
i do like his late 60's music a lot also thru early 70's
Man, that sure is some smooth stuff! Can't go wrong with that period. Miles, Coltrane, Evans, Blakey, Mingus, Gillespie were JAZZIN it.
Good morning!!
after 3 cups of coffee and a bowl of indica Bill plays this, hmmm am I being watched?{#Eek} 

"Honey the chores ain't getting done today" 
Hmmmm, yeah, JAZZ, nice!  {#Cool}
 thewiseking wrote:

NKC did not want to record it initially. Felt it was too "ethereal". Didn't get it. Yet, he recorded it anyway and the result was sublime. 
If that ain't a stretch I don't know what is. 

 
Okay; I see what you meant by "a stretch" in that way.  I thought you were suggesting that he was lacking the musical artistry to record the tune.
 Proclivities wrote:

I'm not so sure it was "a stretch" for Nat - his recording is masterful and preceded this version by several years.  This is very masterful as well.

 
NKC did not want to record it initially. Felt it was too "ethereal". Didn't get it. Yet, he recorded it anyway and the result was sublime. 
If that ain't a stretch I don't know what is. 

Rainy Sunday afternoon... now, Miles Davis.

Cocktails are needed. Quiet conversations are expected.

Thank you, RP.

Hits my moods like you're here
Now that's nice.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Miles was very image-conscious from the beginning, and he did not like to be photographed smiling. He didn't like the "happy-go-lucky" image portrayed by Louis Armstrong and others, which he felt catered to the safe post-minstrel image of blacks that white society felt comfortable with ("Song of the South" anyone?). Of course when one is almost never seen smiling, it's such a pleasant change to see them when they are. That's what's great about this photo; Miles actually let his guard down for a second and showed his warmer side.

 
Thank you On_The__Beach for this note to the beautiful photo, provided by Carl, and Thank you also to Calypsus_1 for the historical background of the photographer/artist who took that great shot!!!
Beautiful sharing time with great music, and brilliant listeners, cheers!
Very nice indeed Bill...
 
 thewiseking wrote:
One of the most beautiful, ethereal pop songs ever recorded. It was a stretch for Nat and we are all fortunate he took it. It was clearly no stretch for Miles.
 
I'm not so sure it was "a stretch" for Nat - his recording is masterful and preceded this version by several years.  This is very masterful as well.
More Miles, please! {#Smile}
I had this nagging version I had heard this song before, and not just on RP.  Although it wasn't this version  — a masterful version that even a jazz philistine like myself can see is brilliant —  this song was used prominently in the film Moulin Rouge
 Carl wrote:
Great photo of Miles Davis

I think this may be one of the best photos of Miles I ever saw (taken by Tom Palumbo*
  

 * Tom Palumbo (1921 – 2008) was an American photographer and theatre director. He was born in Molfetta, Italy, in 1921. His family moved when he was about 12 years old to New York City. As a young man Palumbo was employed first building scale models for ships in an engineering company. Later he was employed as an assistant by photographer James Abbe.



Escapism....{#Chillpill}
Going down. Ladies underwear. Ping. Doors opening. 
Dear RP,
you're tearing me apart today.
Keep it up.

Sincerely,
A Fan.

 ziakut wrote:
Not my fave by Miles Davis. A few instruments seem sharp to me and it makes this somewhat unpleasant to me.

 
A favorite by Miles Davis? Hard to figure out how to determine this. I suspect that the goal here is to provide a tension that may not ever be resolved. My sense is that he never released anything that was nor precisely as intended, sharp, flat, and every permutation in between. At the very least, hearing this caused me to stop my cooking and move to the computer.
Had to PSD through six or seven synth/drum machine "tunes" before I landed on some real "music".
 ccwcool wrote:
So cool, I'm cold!

 
......... freeeeeeeeeezing even :))
So cool, I'm cold!
Exactly my sentiments too...
 

slrminav wrote:
This is exactly why every other radio station I listen to pales in comparison to Radio Paradise. You will just pop in some Nature Boy. LOVE.

 


 bachbeet wrote:
Miles seems to always do such cool songs.
 
'Cause he WAS cool; anything he attempted came out cool.  From his obituary in the NY Times: "Other trumpeters play faster and higher, but more than in any technical feats, Mr. Davis's influence lay in his phrasing and sense of space. 'I always listen to what I can leave out,' he would say."
 Sweet_Virginia wrote:
I always feel there is something magical- or even a little disturbing about this piece of music. Like its from another dimension.

 
it is
Excellent work.  Now if only we had some overlay Tom Waits personal woes commentary at his "voice like 10 miles of bad road" best.  That would really smoke it! 
One of the most beautiful, ethereal pop songs ever recorded. It was a stretch for Nat and we are all fortunate he took it. It was clearly no stretch for Miles.
Not my fave by Miles Davis. A few instruments seem sharp to me and it makes this somewhat unpleasant to me.
 Zeito wrote:
I really miss having the release year in the song notes.  

 
Click the album cover
Ahhhhhh.  So nice.
And warm.  I swear I felt a bit warmer here on this cool October morning as I listened to this sweet little piece. 

Thank you Mr. Davis.
this is so very very good!!
I'm finding myself tip-toeing through the house, pausing in doorways, looking for my violin case.... with a tommy gun inside.
I really miss having the release year in the song notes.  
thank you  {#Dance}
Love Nat King Coles' rendition......
This song-boring!
Fools in love, well are there any other kind of lovers?
beautiful (smoke-induced?) smile...

 
On_The_Beach wrote:

Miles was very image-conscious from the beginning, and he did not like to be photographed smiling. He didn't like the "happy-go-lucky" image portrayed by Louis Armstrong and others, which he felt catered to the safe post-minstrel image of blacks that white society felt comfortable with ("Song of the South" anyone?). Of course when one is almost never seen smiling, it's such a pleasant change to see them when they are. That's what's great about this photo; Miles actually let his guard down for a second and showed his warmer side.
 


AMEN JOHN!! (add milton & dorham for me and I'll be island VP )

 
coloradojohn wrote:
If I had this, along with Kind of Blue, some 'Trane, Baker, a bit of Mingus, Dolphy and Blakey...I could do a desert-island lifetime or two...!
 


thank you thank you THANK YOU bill & bec.  You have made my day.  Follow up with some Nick Drake, I may have to leave work for the casino.
Taxi Driver-ish. 
Me likey. In the berries and bananas category of comparison, this has way more soul but just a fraction of Arcade Fire's noise. 
I always feel there is something magical- or even a little disturbing about this piece of music. Like its from another dimension.
 rdo wrote:

Speaking as a charter member of the Jazz Haters Club, I am well aware of what you claim, it is an undisputed fact.  I'd venture this applies for many, perhaps most, professional writers as well.  Does that mean I must eat your spinach and like it?  No sir, it don't.  {#No}
 

It all depends on how its cooked and presented ...spinach comes in all shapes and forms as in 'Esccofiers Culinary Bible.' :-)
Like a slow and delicious slippery slope ...
If I had this, along with Kind of Blue, some 'Trane, Baker, a bit of Mingus, Dolphy and Blakey...I could do a desert-island lifetime or two...!
I like the work Miles did. If you don't, there's a PSD button and a whole world of other stations to listen to.
An incredibly beautiful piece of music. Draws me to the speakers from whatever room I'm in...
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Miles was very image-conscious from the beginning, and he did not like to be photographed smiling. He didn't like the "happy-go-lucky" image portrayed by Louis Armstrong and others, which he felt catered to the safe post-minstrel image of blacks that white society felt comfortable with ("Song of the South" anyone?). Of course when one is almost never seen smiling, it's such a pleasant change to see them when they are. That's what's great about this photo; Miles actually let his guard down for a second and showed his warmer side.
 
In his later years, Miles should his back side to the audience.
 Toke wrote:


Ummmm such negative comments I'm reading here... Can I just draw your attention to a significant observation and I'm sure I will be backed up on this and that is that 99% of Classical musicians worldwide choose Modern Jazz as their second Genre of music and to take a break from playing classical they play jazz for fun as its so interlocked with the great composers.. But that could well be a highbrow statement.

 
Speaking as a charter member of the Jazz Haters Club, I am well aware of what you claim, it is an undisputed fact.  I'd venture this applies for many, perhaps most, professional writers as well.  Does that mean I must eat your spinach and like it?  No sir, it don't.  {#No}
 Carl wrote:
Great photo of Miles Davis

I think this may be one of the best photos of Miles I ever saw (taken by Tom Palumbo)

 
Miles was very image-conscious from the beginning, and he did not like to be photographed smiling. He didn't like the "happy-go-lucky" image portrayed by Louis Armstrong and others, which he felt catered to the safe post-minstrel image of blacks that white society felt comfortable with ("Song of the South" anyone?). Of course when one is almost never seen smiling, it's such a pleasant change to see them when they are. That's what's great about this photo; Miles actually let his guard down for a second and showed his warmer side.
Miles seems to always do such cool songs.


This is cool...

 
This is exactly why every other radio station I listen to pales in comparison to Radio Paradise. You will just pop in some Nature Boy. LOVE.
Nothing better than Miles, ever.. and this song? wow... a 10 he is the best ever..... just the perfect musician
 Misterfixit wrote:
After perusing some of the comments herein am I to assume that some feel Jazz Music is a "political statement"?  Just wondering where that idea came from?
 
It sounds like it came from someone trying to make a "political statement".
 jbjnr wrote:
wow! I finally heard a Miles Davis track that I like.

(That new medication must be better than I thought)

 
There's more where that came from. I love his work from the mid-50's and the 60's. He loses me with the fusion stuff in the 70's, but I appreciate his desire to keep changing, to keep trying new stuff.
 Misterfixit wrote:
After perusing some of the comments herein am I to assume that some feel Jazz Music is a "political statement"?  Just wondering where that idea came from?
 
I think that idea must have been retrieved from a posterior holding facility.

wow! I finally heard a Miles Davis track that I like.

(That new medication must be better than I thought)



marvelous...  love it...

 
 rKokon wrote:
Abhor this genre more than I can say. Isn't there a jazz-haters' club out there where I can get affirmation of my vexation over pointless, unstructured meandering and the misuse of brass instruments for purposes of seduction? Don't kid yourselves, folks; jazz isn't intellectual, it is a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability. And it has the quality of irresolution and trailing off into nothingness. How many people who have conscious purposes in their lives do you know who like jazz?  

Wow. This post the 3+ years old and still gets reactions. As a musician, I'll only suggest that jazz is as difficult a genre to learn as any, including varying forms of classical and romantic orchestral literature. And Miles (love that pic BTW—one of the very few I've seen in which he's actually smiling), along with massive talents like Coltrane, Louis, Django, Bill Evans, Mingus (and many more—the list goes on), plumbed its depths with a singularity of purpose that in its way defined the last half of the 20th century. I don't pretend to understand but a fraction of what I hear, but I'm in awe of what little I do understand.

And, son, in my 7th decade, I'm pretty sure that I've had a conscious purpose to my life, and I love jazz.

Happy New Year, all!!


 Aural_not_Oral wrote:

Affirmed.  Sign me up for the jazz-haters club.  Just can't even listen to this... 

 

Ummmm such negative comments I'm reading here... Can I just draw your attention to a significant observation and I'm sure I will be backed up on this and that is that 99% of Classical musicians worldwide choose Modern Jazz as their second Genre of music and to take a break from playing classical they play jazz for fun as its so interlocked with the great composers.. But that could well be a highbrow statement.

 Dinges,_the_Dude wrote:
Smooth relaxing {#Clap}!!!!!
 
I just checked out your neighborhood. Nice!


Soooo smooth...  everybody in my hotel room loves this jazz...

 
Smooth relaxing {#Clap}!!!!!
Great photo of Miles Davis

I think this may be one of the best photos of Miles I ever saw (taken by Tom Palumbo)

After perusing some of the comments herein am I to assume that some feel Jazz Music is a "political statement"?  Just wondering where that idea came from?
Thank you, plain and simple.
Wow...like the vibes too
 Ahnyer_Keester wrote:
Man I love this station. Really, honestly eclectic in all the right ways.
 


I agree. Not my favorite Miles cut, but glad to hear the eclectic mix even when one or two aren't in my subjective favorites list.
Man I love this station. Really, honestly eclectic in all the right ways.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

{#Cheers}  (I've said it before; jazz is not for the simple-minded.)


Hey, where's the Like button?
Thank you RP for sharing Davis' version of this song. I'd not heard his before, but thanks to BBC Radio 4, I recently learned about the song and it's creator. The BBC programme isn't available anymore, but they'll surely re-air it. https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00stsjh

feel like I should be in a small club with a glass of red...


I always feel like I am watching an old Twilight Zone episode when RP plays this.
great take on a great song.  I know all the words by heart thanks to Nat King Cole (and my dad...).
I don't love all jazz, but I surely love this jazz. Miles.
 Cynaera wrote:
"...a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability..."?  Funny, I've always thought that was the GOVERNMENT. {#Lol}  Could you possibly use more emoticons?  I think you forgot the birdie-flip one.  I wonder:  Should I take your comment as an insult, since I am a person with a conscious purpose and I LIKE jazz?  A lot of my friends also have conscious purposes in their lives and like jazz.  They are neurologists, cardiologists, teachers, authors, artists, paramedics, cops,  mechanics, miners, business-owners, real estate agents, and crusaders for the preservation of the earth. To a person, they like jazz. 

Next time you feel the need to vilify an entire genré (by the way, don't you know how to make an accent mark over the proper letter?  I guess your expertise on the subject is limited, which tells me that you're a blowhard who thinks by using big words and complicated concepts, you can impress people), try to be a little less self-important about it.

I hope you find that jazz-haters club, sink into it, and never come out again. Bliss is ignorance. {#Mrgreen}
 
{#Cheers}  (I've said it before; jazz is not for the simple-minded.)

 ubuntourist wrote:
I'll take Miles, to go, before I sleep. {#Rolleyes}

 
{#Clap}

 rKokon wrote:
Abhor this genre more than I can say. Isn't there a jazz-haters' club out there where I can get affirmation of my vexation over pointless, unstructured meandering and the misuse of brass instruments for purposes of seduction? Don't kid yourselves, folks; jazz isn't intellectual, it is a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability. And it has the quality of irresolution and trailing off into nothingness. How many people who have conscious purposes in their lives do you know who like jazz?

I was about to correlate liking/disliking jazz with political propensities, but instead will refrain.


 
(To fellow RPeeps - I am about to be offensive.  Please turn a blind eye.)

"...a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability..."?  Funny, I've always thought that was the GOVERNMENT. {#Lol}  Could you possibly use more emoticons?  I think you forgot the birdie-flip one.  I wonder:  Should I take your comment as an insult, since I am a person with a conscious purpose and I LIKE jazz?  A lot of my friends also have conscious purposes in their lives and like jazz.  They are neurologists, cardiologists, teachers, authors, artists, paramedics, cops,  mechanics, miners, business-owners, real estate agents, and crusaders for the preservation of the earth. To a person, they like jazz. 

Next time you feel the need to vilify an entire genré (by the way, don't you know how to make an accent mark over the proper letter?  I guess your expertise on the subject is limited, which tells me that you're a blowhard who thinks by using big words and complicated concepts, you can impress people), try to be a little less self-important about it.

I hope you find that jazz-haters club, sink into it, and never come out again. Bliss is ignorance. {#Mrgreen}
Hellz yeah.  Sublime; timeless.
 yofitofu wrote:
Oh this is sublime....play Miles anytime......
 
Yes, please do!

 lovemydog wrote:
 
All I see from your overuse of $5.00 words is that you have no idea what you're talking about. Jazz is one of the most difficult genres of music to play, and you may think it "unstructured and meandering", but you couldn't be more wrong. There is always a pathway through the song; some people, like Miles, just tended to take their time getting through it.

I wonder what music you find amazing.

 
Agreed. Jazz is America's classical music.  If someone doesn't like it, all I can say is 'wow.'

 Lrobby99 wrote:
Nice, if it was around midnight, not 10 in the morning at work.
 
Ha..I am with you...just not right in the middle of the day.

I'll take Miles, to go, before I sleep. {#Rolleyes}

I love this song, but much prefer the Nat King Cole version.  Sorry, Miles just doesn't do it for me.
Ohhhhh, thanks, Bill. I needed some 'Miles' this morning........... sooooo cooool.
Nice, if it was around midnight, not 10 in the morning at work.
 lovemydog wrote:
Man, those vibes!
All I need now is a martini and Don Draper...
 
Too true, although I'd take a scotch and January Jones.

Oh this is sublime....play Miles anytime......
This is just great: sit back and (learn to) enjoy!! This music takes me away, just like the album "ascenseur pour l'échafaud". Great!!!
 rKokon wrote:
Abhor this genre more than I can say. Isn't there a jazz-haters' club out there where I can get affirmation of my vexation over pointless, unstructured meandering and the misuse of brass instruments for purposes of seduction? Don't kid yourselves, folks; jazz isn't intellectual, it is a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability. And it has the quality of irresolution and trailing off into nothingness. How many people who have conscious purposes in their lives do you know who like jazz?

I was about to correlate liking/disliking jazz with political propensities, but instead will refrain.


 
Affirmed.  Sign me up for the jazz-haters club.  Just can't even listen to this... 

black lodge

This is SO weird... I was listening to Nat King Cole's version of this song, and wishing my dad could hear it, too. 

Gotta go cry now - I miss my dad. I love this song, but I'd rather hear it by Dad's favorite - Nat King Cole....
Amazing music, but the digital conversion has added some terrible artifacts. It's screaming "low bit rate" the whole way through.
On a roll Bill!!  Great segues. onya!

Yep, yep{#Yes}


ddog wrote:
Too mellow at 8:30 AM EST. I need something a little more lively to get me going in the morning!
Dangerous, edgy, unbalanced, simmering - mellow?

11...No wait 12.
Wonderful around 2am. This time of the morning, not so much. Must find additional coffee.
It sure gives you that "staggering" feeling, but that is Blues music for you.  Miles can stumble into any mistress' arms and I would still love this soothing drunk ballad.  AHHHHHhhhhhhh.{#Notworthy}

 
lwilkinson wrote:
Drunk man {#Drunk} crawls off the bar stool, says "Night Joe" and walks out of the bar.

He walks unsteadily down the sidewalk away from his ex-wifes' apartment and towards his mistress' home, running the existential nihilistic {#Eh} confusion {#Stupid} through his wandering mind {#Sad} over and over, looking for meaning.{#Wall}

He crosses the street ................ and gets run over before he can find solace in his mistresses arms.

Wah!
{#Cry}{#Cry}

With depressing tunes like this what did you expect?

I do like it tho'.
 


 rKokon wrote:
 jazz isn't intellectual, it is a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability.
 
Ha ha! Thanks for the belly laugh!!!

"Accountability" is certainly my top priority for any musical genre...

Drunk man {#Drunk} crawls off the bar stool, says "Night Joe" and walks out of the bar.

He walks unsteadily down the sidewalk away from his ex-wifes' apartment and towards his mistress' home, running the existential nihilistic {#Eh} confusion {#Stupid} through his wandering mind {#Sad} over and over, looking for meaning.{#Wall}

He crosses the street ................ and gets run over before he can find solace in his mistresses arms.

Wah!
{#Cry}{#Cry}

With depressing tunes like this what did you expect?

I do like it tho'.
such a very, very beautiful song.

Miles handles it well.
 lovemydog wrote:
 
All I see from your overuse of $5.00 words is that you have no idea what you're talking about. {} I wonder what music you find amazing.
 
rKokon seems to think everything he doesn't like is the downfall of civilization but then isn't really sure what he is screeching about, as illustrated in this wholly off-topic rant from several years ago. 

 rKokon wrote:
Abhor this genre more than I can say. Isn't there a jazz-haters' club out there where I can get affirmation of my vexation over pointless, unstructured meandering and the misuse of brass instruments for purposes of seduction? Don't kid yourselves, folks; jazz isn't intellectual, it is a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability. And it has the quality of irresolution and trailing off into nothingness. How many people who have conscious purposes in their lives do you know who like jazz?

I was about to correlate liking/disliking jazz with political propensities, but instead will refrain.


  
All I see from your overuse of $5.00 words is that you have no idea what you're talking about. Jazz is one of the most difficult genres of music to play, and you may think it "unstructured and meandering", but you couldn't be more wrong. There is always a pathway through the song; some people, like Miles, just tended to take their time getting through it.

I wonder what music you find amazing.

Man, those vibes!

All I need now is a martini and Don Draper...
 Bone wrote:
You will receive no such affirmation here... now go and check your silverware drawer, there may be forks and spoons in the same partition!!!!
 
{#Lol} Solid gold!
Never too much Miles, IMO.
Awesome...
Actually, Miles Davis stole it also. The tune is from Antonín Dvořák's "Piano Quintet No. 2 in A, Opus 81" (1887). Then it was used in a 1948 movie and then Nat King Cole did the most successful version of it. This song has probably been recorded by well over 100 artists over the years. My favorite version is Annie Haslam's version.


 
cc_rider wrote:

If you're gonna steal, steal from the best.

I think 'homage' is a better term though...

c.

 


Now all we need is Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds' Nature Boy...

 rKokon wrote:
Abhor this genre more than I can say. Isn't there a jazz-haters' club out there where I can get affirmation of my vexation over pointless, unstructured meandering and the misuse of brass instruments for purposes of seduction? Don't kid yourselves, folks; jazz isn't intellectual, it is a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability. And it has the quality of irresolution and trailing off into nothingness. How many people who have conscious purposes in their lives do you know who like jazz?

I was about to correlate liking/disliking jazz with political propensities, but instead will refrain.


 
You will receive no such affirmation here... now go and check your silverware drawer, there may be forks and spoons in the same partition!!!!

When I was in Highschool I had to do a biography on a famous person.  Mine had to relate to music.  I loved music, but my scope was narrow, country music and rock and roll.  My history teacher introduced me to Miles Davis and suggested I do my report on him.  Thank GOD, he opened up my musical taste. I have become more ecletic in my years, probably due to some experience to jazz.

I love Miles Davis, he broke the mold, he stepped outside the box, not always successfully, but always with a musicians ear!


 rKokon wrote:
Abhor this genre more than I can say. Isn't there a jazz-haters' club out there where I can get affirmation of my vexation over pointless, unstructured meandering and the misuse of brass instruments for purposes of seduction? Don't kid yourselves, folks; jazz isn't intellectual, it is a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability. And it has the quality of irresolution and trailing off into nothingness. How many people who have conscious purposes in their lives do you know who like jazz?

I was about to correlate liking/disliking jazz with political propensities, but instead will refrain.


 
Uhhhh... dude, if you can pull your head out of your ass long enough to read this: jazz is a unique American art form. Nearly every truly intellectual person I have ever known (and that's more than a few) has been a Miles Davis fan.

I'm sure there's a better online community for your musical entertainment. If not, listen to your iPod. Or talk to yourself. Just don't start answering yourself. That could get awkward. {#Grumpy}

Most of us here (paying members, anyway) like our music eclectic. Not that you have to pay, or anything. It's just the communal, Democratic thing to do.

You know. The common good, and all that jazz.{#Daisy}

 bodhi wrote:
apropos that 'unstructured' argument, what's so great about this is how it keeps gliding in and out of structure, in and out of harmonics and melody, surprising you at every turn, but still somehow familiar...
 

Well put.

Miles seemed, throughout his career, to dance on the edge of structure and the whole thing falling apart. Not always successful, but always somehow fascinating. This was both.
Have to say I love the segue from Iron&Wine/Calexico to Miles here.  Ain't nothing like RP... 


Too mellow at 8:30 AM EST. I need something a little more lively to get me going in the morning!
apropos that 'unstructured' argument, what's so great about this is how it keeps gliding in and out of structure, in and out of harmonics and melody, surprising you at every turn, but still somehow familiar...
 rKokon wrote:
Abhor this genre more than I can say. Isn't there a jazz-haters' club out there where I can get affirmation of my vexation over pointless, unstructured meandering and the misuse of brass instruments for purposes of seduction? Don't kid yourselves, folks; jazz isn't intellectual, it is a path to the validation of the lack of structure and accountability. And it has the quality of irresolution and trailing off into nothingness. How many people who have conscious purposes in their lives do you know who like jazz?

I was about to correlate liking/disliking jazz with political propensities, but instead will refrain.


 
It always amazes me how some people prefer listening to their own senseless drivel, instead of enjoying good music.
By the way, one of my conscious purposes in life IS listening to good music.