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Erik Satie — Gymnopedie No. 1
Album: Satie: Piano Music (Frank Glazer, Piano)
Avg rating:
8.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2601









Released: 1889
Length: 3:09
Plays (last 30 days): 2
(Instrumental)
Comments (195)add comment
I learned to play this when I was about 5 much to my piano teacher's surprise. Tempo is the most difficult part. Deceptively difficult, still challenging.
Thank you, Radio Paradise, for introducing me to this. It’s because of you that I recognized this song in The Queen’s Gambit. The composer’s name, “Erik Satie”, came to me.
 Jelani wrote:
You're both acting like assholes. What does this tune have to do with US politics?

Posted 4 months ago by hayduke2: Hey_Porter wrote:A song I cannot imagine Donald J. Trump listening to - Quiet, reflective, contemplative


FABULOUS MUSIC : ) here's a Clive Irving article from August 2016 "fun" to read again


Donald Trump: In Your Heart You Know He’s Nuts
 
I agree - this music is another world away from the sewer that is contemporary America.

Tired of winning yet?

Is there a bottom to America's humiliation?



 rocklandlove wrote:

Thus Satie invented ambient music. As quoted above (merci philipr!), Satie said what was needed was a kind of "music as furniture -- music that would be part of the ambient sounds." And he was humble about its purpose: to "soften the sounds of the knives and forks , without calling too much attention to itself." His music is sublime - the more so for its humility of purpose.
 
Interesting comments. Analytical philosophers name "furniture of the world" some of the most important entities that surrounding us (nature, the human body, sounds, music). I'd like to think of "furniture" as essential or foundational of to experience the world in the way we do.
Hinterland’s Who’s Who
 xray38 wrote:
Released 1889. Music is timeless. (ok, not all, but this is)
 

The year Keith Richards was born!
 laurieoc53 wrote:
Ahh, there is a version with Cleo Laine and James Galway. Timeless, other worldly.
 

I really like the version from Blüchel & Von Deylen



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koNi1v3LUMs
Ahh, there is a version with Cleo Laine and James Galway. Timeless, other worldly.
I'm sitting at home working in the midst of all this crazy social distancing.  My cats are behind me sleeping softly.  Soft kitty warm kitty, little ball of fur, . . .



 
Rozsa wrote:
A stray cat followed me home one evening.

I took her in, she was afraid and rather ill. I put Erik Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 on. 

Gradually she mellowed out and began to purr. 

She was my best friend for nearly 20 years.  

Whenever I hear this, I can't help but think of her and always get tears in my eyes.  

I called her Rozsa.  
 

Is there an extended cut? A dance mix? Switched-on-Satie?

Just kidding.
 Piranga wrote:
Too bad more musicians don't realize that excruciating beauty can be drawn simply.
 
Maybe it's inevitable that more "artists" (musicians, painters, writers, etc.) don't realize that.  Theoretically that could make it more difficult to distinguish the true artists from the technicians.
 Jelani wrote:
 Rozsa wrote:
A stray cat followed me home one evening.

I took her in, she was afraid and rather ill. I put Erik Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 on. 

Gradually she mellowed out and began to purr. 

She was my best friend for nearly 20 years.  

Whenever I hear this, I can't help but think of her and always get tears in my eyes.  

I called her Rozsa.  
 https://youtu.be/0M7ibPk37_U
a love story, our animal friends are precious

 

 Rozsa wrote:
A stray cat followed me home one evening.

I took her in, she was afraid and rather ill. I put Erik Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 on. 

Gradually she mellowed out and began to purr. 

She was my best friend for nearly 20 years.  

Whenever I hear this, I can't help but think of her and always get tears in my eyes.  

I called her Rozsa.  
 https://youtu.be/0M7ibPk37_U

You're both acting like assholes. What does this tune have to do with US politics?

Posted 4 months ago by hayduke2: Hey_Porter wrote:A song I cannot imagine Donald J. Trump listening to - Quiet, reflective, contemplative


FABULOUS MUSIC : ) here's a Clive Irving article from August 2016 "fun" to read again


Donald Trump: In Your Heart You Know He’s Nuts
From the lovely and inspiring movie The Black Stallion.  Music by Carmine Coppola, the father of movie director Francis, who formerly played with Toscani.  Can't help but notice the similarity. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eu3y3dyUxW0

Oddly enough, I finally found this clip, four tracks later, while RP served up Sennen, by the band Ride. 
Too bad more musicians don't realize that excruciating beauty can be drawn simply.
 bmccaul wrote:
I know it would be sacrilege for any of you that are classical music fans, but every time I hear this, I think fondly of Blood, Sweat and Tear's version (Variations on a Theme by Eric Satie), and wish that might get a play on RP sometime.
 
Not sacrilege at all (from this classical music fan) - simply a reinterpretation that fitted the scene at the time, while yet retaining the core of the original.
Didn't know that BS&T track - thank you for the intro
Man on Wire 
Listening to this, figured it was another mood number from the Roma soundtrack.  Whoa, 1889!
I thought this was that insipid ditty that Ryan Gosling keeps playing in La La Land.
Released 1889. Music is timeless. (ok, not all, but this is)
 Hey_Porter wrote:
A song I cannot imagine Donald J. Trump listening to - Quiet, reflective, contemplative

 
FABULOUS MUSIC : )    here's a Clive Irving article from August 2016 "fun" to read again


Donald Trump: In Your Heart You Know He’s Nuts
This is a solid 8. Sometimes it almost acts as a sound track of exactly where your at. But, sometimes, it is a total buzz kill.
 dziebell wrote:
Erik Satie was a one hit wonder.  This is it.  Mighty fine. 
 
2 hit wonder...you can add

Gnossienne No1






 Rozsa wrote:
A stray cat followed me home one evening.

I took her in, she was afraid and rather ill. I put Erik Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 on. 

Gradually she mellowed out and began to purr. 

She was my best friend for nearly 20 years.  

Whenever I hear this, I can't help but think of her and always get tears in my eyes.  

I called her Rozsa.  
 
Sweet and nostalgic story. Thank you for sharing Rozsa! You're special.
I agree ... first heard this on a that album ...and have loved it since ...
 bmccaul wrote:
I know it would be sacrilege for any of you that are classical music fans, but every time I hear this, I think fondly of Blood, Sweat and Tear's version (Variations on a Theme by Eric Satie), and wish that might get a play on RP sometime.
 
Great comment, God I love RP and the listeners it attracts :)

And by God I mean we
I know it would be sacrilege for any of you that are classical music fans, but every time I hear this, I think fondly of Blood, Sweat and Tear's version (Variations on a Theme by Eric Satie), and wish that might get a play on RP sometime.
 Proclivities wrote:

I remember Woolite commercials from back then having more up-tempo music.  There was even a snappy jingle: "You'll look better in a sweater washed in Woolite..."  It does seem like there was some TV ad that used this music - or a facsimile of it - during the '70s though.  Maybe a perfume ad?
 

I'm stickin' with my Woolite theory, dammit!   ; )
always reminds me of the movie another woman. this track was used really well in that film. 

but the woolite thing made me chuckle
beautiful
My heart hurts
 On_The_Beach wrote:
One of the most beautiful pieces of music ever, but I'm pretty sure it was used in a Woolite TV ad in the early 70s.
 
I remember Woolite commercials from back then having more up-tempo music.  There was even a snappy jingle: "You'll look better in a sweater washed in Woolite..."  It does seem like there was some TV ad that used this music - or a facsimile of it - during the '70s though.  Maybe a perfume ad?
One of RP's odder segues: 




 Foo Fighters "My Hero"   --->  this. 



Grinding guitars, ear-pounding drums, scorched lungs and then...silence dotted with echoes.
  
 Tritter wrote:
kunalb wrote:
I'm sure I've heard it in a movie too... or in a commercial. Love this.
Unfaithful......
 
Woody Allen's "Another Woman" 1988  Gena Rowlands and Mia Farrow.  Great film, great soundtrack.
From those of us who have listened to classical - modern formal music, Satie's Gymnopedies are a bit too overplayed.
 GeorgeMWoods wrote:
Seems to me that Paul Simon ought to be paying this guy royalties. Check out "Old Friends."

 
Paul Simon aught to be paying a whole lot of people royalties, as this hilarious parody points out: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gS3Jj8E3_xw 
One of the most beautiful pieces of music ever, but I'm pretty sure it was used in a Woolite TV ad in the early 70s.
I thought this sounded familiar!!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0M7ibPk37_U
Night.. Night music.. 
How often do you hear beautiful pieces of classical music on RP? Sit down and shut up.
I like it Bill but you play it too much. There are other beautiful classical pieces. 
 Hey_Porter wrote:
A song I cannot imagine Donald J. Trump listening to - Quiet, reflective, contemplative

 
fabulous music  : )
check out in today's The Daily Beast: In Your Heart You Know He’s Nuts By Clive Irving
https://www.thedailybeast.com/features/2016/donald-trump.html
Seems to me that Paul Simon ought to be paying this guy royalties. Check out "Old Friends."
A song I cannot imagine Donald J. Trump listening to - Quiet, reflective, contemplative
Precious  {#Heartkiss}
 ChrisVIII wrote:

{#Clap} idem !  

 
Yep. It's like an aural vacation. 
Lovely tune!
It takes every kind of people... Part of the piano sounds a lot like that melody from Robert Palmer...
I love this just like I love "Night Porter" by Japan.
This is one of the selections in my "Classical Music For Baby" station on Spotify; my daughter loves it!
 
Wonderful tune. Thanks Bill.
 Rozsa wrote:
A stray cat followed me home one evening.

I took her in, she was afraid and rather ill. I put Erik Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 on. 

Gradually she mellowed out and began to purr. 

She was my best friend for nearly 20 years.  

Whenever I hear this, I can't help but think of her and always get tears in my eyes.  

I called her Rozsa.  

 Wow. You've reminded me of our beloved Sheba, who we had to put down a few years ago, age 23. And now with Erik Satie playing I'm starting to get a little choked up myself. 

This is the Ikea "Why do you feel sorry for this lamp?"  commercial. 
BTW, this 2-CD set is a treasure.
 blkstd wrote:
This song reminds me of one on a Blood, Sweat and Tears album. (~1968)

 
Same song, with variations arranged by Dick Halligan.
mmmmmmmmm {#Meditate}

{#Daisy}
This song reminds me of one on a Blood, Sweat and Tears album. (~1968)
 AndyJ wrote:
Time to stop whatever I am doing.

Get something friendly to savor .

And let the week melt away...

One of my favorite pieces of music....   

 
{#Clap} idem !  
As a balletdancer I do of course love that {#Daisy}
Something is wrong with this recording or the delivery of it to my PC as it is distorting, previous and the following track sounded excellent
A stray cat followed me home one evening.

I took her in, she was afraid and rather ill. I put Erik Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 on. 

Gradually she mellowed out and began to purr. 

She was my best friend for nearly 20 years.  

Whenever I hear this, I can't help but think of her and always get tears in my eyes.  

I called her Rozsa.  
 oldsaxon wrote:

You should try playing it :)

 

This does sound deceivingly simple to play but I trust it is not.
 philipr wrote:

Selon un témoignage du peintre Fernand Léger (1881-1955):

« Nous déjeunions, des amis et lui dans un restaurant. Obligés de subir une musique tapageuse, insupportable, nous quittons la salle et Satie nous dit: « Il y a tout de même à réaliser une musique d'ameublement, c'est-à-dire une musique qui ferait partie des bruits ambiants, qui en tiendrait compte. Je la suppose mélodieuse, elle adoucirait le bruit des cou­teaux, des fourchettes sans les dominer, sans s'imposer. Elle meublerait les silences pesant parfois entre les convives. Elle leur épargnerait les banalités courantes. Elle neutraliserait, en même temps, les bruits de la rue qui entrent dans le jeu sans discrétion. » Ce serait, disait-il, répondre à un besoin. »


 
Thus Satie invented ambient music. As quoted above (merci philipr!), Satie said what was needed was a kind of "music as furniture -- music that would be part of the ambient sounds." And he was humble about its purpose: to "soften the sounds of the knives and forks , without calling too much attention to itself." His music is sublime - the more so for its humility of purpose.
I so wish, for classical music, that we could get beyond just listing the composer and the name of the work. This ain't just a pop record whose performer is the same as the composer. To those of us who love classical, these things matter. There are hundreds of recordings of this piece, and the performer deserves a credit. Otherwise, thanks for playing it!

Selon un témoignage du peintre Fernand Léger (1881-1955):

« Nous déjeunions, des amis et lui dans un restaurant. Obligés de subir une musique tapageuse, insupportable, nous quittons la salle et Satie nous dit: « Il y a tout de même à réaliser une musique d'ameublement, c'est-à-dire une musique qui ferait partie des bruits ambiants, qui en tiendrait compte. Je la suppose mélodieuse, elle adoucirait le bruit des cou­teaux, des fourchettes sans les dominer, sans s'imposer. Elle meublerait les silences pesant parfois entre les convives. Elle leur épargnerait les banalités courantes. Elle neutraliserait, en même temps, les bruits de la rue qui entrent dans le jeu sans discrétion. » Ce serait, disait-il, répondre à un besoin. »

So beautiful piano but, is it me, my speakers, or this piano version which sound not so good ?
 dziebell wrote:
Erik Satie was a one hit wonder.  This is it.  Mighty fine. 

 
Umm Gnossiennes?
 Yes  mash001 wrote:
As this piece began, I immediately found myself breathing deeply and relaxing. A sign of good music... ♥
 

 


 dziebell wrote:
Erik Satie was a one hit wonder.  This is it.  Mighty fine. 

 

If  had one hit...it would be this good.

                                                          .. So melancholy..so much like life.
 Pedro1874 wrote:
What a great surprise to hear this beautiful piece of music on RP.  It was used perfectly in the sound track to a wonderful, very deep, Woody Allen/Gena Rowlands/Mia Farrow movie - "Another Woman" 1988

 
What wonderful film features this music?  Always scroll down and someone will know!{#Yes}
Erik Satie was a one hit wonder.  This is it.  Mighty fine. 
 EarthMama wrote:

A perfect example of the beauty of simplicity.



 
You should try playing it :)
As this piece began, I immediately found myself breathing deeply and relaxing. A sign of good music... ♥
 
I am walking to my local library this evening to take out "The Banquet Years" a reading assignment from a great artist/teacher Dale Henry, back in '80's School of Visual Arts...Satie, Rosseau and Paris in the 20's, it is a marvelous book (Shattuck?), then maybe I'll watch "My Dinner with Andre"!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBRiwouSG2c
theme put to good use in this film (not one of the better clips unfortunately) 
It's a beuatiful song...for Sunday nite before I pray.


But right now...this moment in time...it's Friday freaking afternoon and it's a Summer day...and these days are running out.


PLAY SOME RNR!!!       
Time to stop whatever I am doing.

Get something friendly to savor .

And let the week melt away...

One of my favorite pieces of music....   

A perfect example of the beauty of simplicity.


I love this, and I love hearing it on RP
 
Makes me think of Captain Picard. {#Angel}
 GarageDragon wrote:
Reminds me of the Ikea lamp commercial.
 
Could you, would you, dare to think bigger? Cultural and artistic associations should go far beyond TV commercials. 
 stunix wrote:
Bless dear Eric.  His music was generally written for , about and in rememberance of his childhood sweetheart for whom he did .... whats the correct word, court?, date?, get off with?     anyway, she dumped him soon after.  

he died quite young, broke and possibly heartbroken.  reflected in his music I think.
 
I was intrigued by this so I looked him up on Wikipedia, but can't find anything to this end. Could you possibly be thinking of someone else? Satie lived to the age of 59, whereupon he died of cirrhosis - after enjoying great success, fame, and the acquaintance of several major figures in the arts.

As to the song: Wonderful.
As always, love this piece. 

Just heard the Stones belting their way through 'Midnight Rambler' and then straight into Erik.... what a sublime juxtaposition!

Now, what about the other great Eric?
No, not him, the Wreckless one!


I love this.  I remember my grandfather playing Satie when I was a little kid.
Reminds me of the Ikea lamp commercial.
is this the endtitle of the assault on precinct 13 movie?
Just the perfect music to listen to on a cold, wet, windy, end-of-summer morning
Timeless masterpiece.
Bless dear Eric.  His music was generally written for , about and in rememberance of his childhood sweetheart for whom he did .... whats the correct word, court?, date?, get off with?     anyway, she dumped him soon after.  

he died quite young, broke and possibly heartbroken.  reflected in his music I think.
This will always remind me of my beautiful, lovely wife who will always be a deep part of my soul. Love you, hunny!
Less is more.
What a great surprise to hear this beautiful piece of music on RP.  It was used perfectly in the sound track to a wonderful, very deep, Woody Allen/Gena Rowlands/Mia Farrow movie - "Another Woman" 1988
Introduced to this by my ex wife. One of two beautiful things the relationship gifted me (the other was my daughter).
 Pyro wrote:
My first introduction to this wonderful piece was on a Blood Sweat and Tears album in the late 60s or early 70s. Have loved it ever since.
 
Very late '60s. It appeared on BS&T's second LP, where David Clayton Thomas had taken over for Al Kooper (and ruined the band).
A little bit o' heaven on earth, there, Bill...aahhh, yes!
 DoctorHooey wrote:
This piece is so ethereal and perfect that it's hard to imagine it being composed. It feels like the only way it could have come into the world is fully formed, lazily drifting down a sunbeam on a warm summer sunday, resting for a moment on a windowsill then tumbling into the dewey hedge below to snooze through the afternoon. It is a perfect thing.

Plus I love being able to hear the performer's breathing on this track. A nice touch 
 
Then again, sometimes a sonata is just an etude.
This radio is very the number one!
Questo brano Ú BELLISSIMO!!
 KalleB wrote:
It's really not the speed that makes a song goodlike ...
 

I assume you mean the tempo of the piece and are not referring to a controlled substance.
This piece is so ethereal and perfect that it's hard to imagine it being composed. It feels like the only way it could have come into the world is fully formed, lazily drifting down a sunbeam on a warm summer sunday, resting for a moment on a windowsill then tumbling into the dewey hedge below to snooze through the afternoon. It is a perfect thing.

Plus I love being able to hear the performer's breathing on this track. A nice touch 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zHBN45fbo8

Playing all the right notes. . .  

Wow...haven't heard this one since I learned it years ago.

 westslope wrote:

Oh yes it is. 
 
It's a nice change of speed...get it?  Speed?  Hee hee...
 KalleB wrote:
It's really not the speed that makes a song goodlike ...
 
Oh yes it is. 

It's really not the speed that makes a song goodlike ...
I've loved this song ever since learning to play it on the piano as a child. Satie is so relaxing and mood-provoking with the Gymnopedies and the Gnossienes. {#Notworthy}
Sweet.  
Teardrops in the rain...
Truly sublime......
 mapman wrote:
If you like this hunt down "Sketches Of Satie" by former Genesis guitarist Steve Hackett.
 


I'll have to check that out! I also like Hackett's work (with or without the rest of the Genesis crew).
Perfet to my chemistry :)
Erik Satie's Gymnopedie was the first song I can remember becoming sentient with — i.e. I never really LOVED music until I heard this at about eleven years old (even though I played violin for several years - where you're more concerned with being twisted into a calloused gymnast than appreciating music). 
Nice song
 jitterjames wrote:
I love this song (9 or 10), but I hear it being played very frequently on RP for years now and as far as I can tell, there are no other Erik Satie songs being played.  Surely Erik has more to offer us?
 
Gnossienne No.1 is the only other Satie piece on the playlist at present, and I seem to hear that piece more than this here.


Wasn't there a peice by him in the soundtrack to "Corrina, Corrina"?
what a wonderfully evocative melody...
This has been cited as a precursor to Ambient, as fashioned by Brian Eno.