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Grateful Dead — The Golden Road
Album: The Grateful Dead
Avg rating:
6.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 583









Released: 1967
Length: 2:06
Plays (last 30 days): 1
See that girl, barefootin' along,
Whistlin' and singin', she's a carryin' on.
There's laughing in her eyes, dancing in her feet,
She's a neon-light diamond and she can live on the street.

Hey hey, hey, come right away (You're in the country)
Come and join the party every day.
Hey hey, hey, come right away (You're in the country)
Come and join the party every day.

Well everybody's dancin' in a ring around the sun
Nobody's finished, we ain't even begun.
So take off your shoes, child, and take off your hat.
Try on your wings and find out where it's at.

Hey hey, hey, come right away (You're in the country)
Come and join the party every day.
Hey hey, hey, come right away (You're in the country)
Come and join the party every day.

Take a vacation, fall out for a while,
Summer's comin' in, and it's goin' outa in style
Well lie down smokin' honey, have yourself a ball,
'Cause your mother's down in Memphis, won't be back 'till the fall.

Hey hey, hey, come right away (You're in the country)
Come and join the party every day.
Hey hey, hey, come right away (You're in the country)
Come and join the party every day.
Hey hey, hey, come right away (You're in the country)
Come and join the party every day.
Hey hey, hey, come right away (You're in the country)
Come and join the party every day.
Comments (89)add comment
Good Ol'
I've been hearing this song since the womb (hippie parents!).  Still sounds good today.
It was 1967. The Dead were known for loooonnngg drawn out jams. This is pretty concise for them at this time of their career.
A configuration of this band, now called Dead and Company, and touring with John Meyer, is playing New Year's Eve in San Francisco. Tickets are absurdly priced, so I won't be going. Much preferred them back in the 80s and 90s, when Jerry was still with us.  
Where the fuck is the low end in this thing?  Bold choice, and it actually sounds pretty good even without much bass.
 scrubbrush wrote:
Jack_Jefferson wrote:
Having gone to college in the late 1980's/early 1990's, I'd have to say the majority of the "deadheads" I knew fit this profile. These same people were just looking for something to conform to. The vast majority were preppy in high school, voted for Reagan or Bush and belonged to a fraternity or sorority. They were into the dead simply for the material peripherals (drugs and clothes) and knew next to nothing about the music. Having said that, I enjoyed their music a lot at the time but did not identify myself as a deadhead mostly because I didn't want to be confused with the college-aged bandwagon deadheads. 

AliGator wrote:

Wow. Most of the DeadHeads I knew in college didn't fit this stereotype. Some of the DeadHeads at my school belonged to a fraternity or sorority, but I'm not sure they voted for Reagan or Bush. And they sure didn't give a shit about the "material peripherals." They just liked the music. I was in college when you were, and I can assure you we were all about the beer. The beer and the music. And the pot. That too.



 
Having been a young fan (since jr high) and attending college in late 80s, there's a certain element of truth in this profiling.   I think most of us were there for the music first.  But there was an element of having to "fit in" - where the right sandals, long hair, talk this way -  our not be fully accepted.  I was a bigger fan than most, but didnt wear birkenstocks...whatever that all means.  Kinda proves people are people, want to fit into something, wherever you go.  
 basslice wrote:
Your comments are absolutely Dead-On. I always thought that Nirvana was nothing but a Greatful Dead rip-off / tribute band. They obvisouly stole all their riffs and style from The Dead! I don't believ they ever gave props to the Dead in their liner notes either... black321 wrote:
Hearing Nirvana's smells like teen spirit after the golden road, i was stunned by the similarity between the two songs in terms of energy and the feel of two young bands. I wonder what this song might have been if the dead were given the equipment and producing talents of the modern day.
 
U may have missed the point there fella.  I was speaking of the energy of two young, relatively undiscovered bands, not the songwriting.  
Jack_Jefferson wrote:
Having gone to college in the late 1980's/early 1990's, I'd have to say the majority of the "deadheads" I knew fit this profile. These same people were just looking for something to conform to. The vast majority were preppy in high school, voted for Reagan or Bush and belonged to a fraternity or sorority. They were into the dead simply for the material peripherals (drugs and clothes) and knew next to nothing about the music. Having said that, I enjoyed their music a lot at the time but did not identify myself as a deadhead mostly because I didn't want to be confused with the college-aged bandwagon deadheads. 

AliGator wrote:

Wow. Most of the DeadHeads I knew in college didn't fit this stereotype. Some of the DeadHeads at my school belonged to a fraternity or sorority, but I'm not sure they voted for Reagan or Bush. And they sure didn't give a shit about the "material peripherals." They just liked the music. I was in college when you were, and I can assure you we were all about the beer. The beer and the music. And the pot. That too.


 

Double Wow. This is hilarious. I too went to college (In Colorado and Santa Cruz California) between 1988 and 1994 (yeah, 4 year degree crammed into 6 years)... I too hung with a pretty-dead-centric group. I agree with each of you in a lot of respects. My wife laughed when i read these comments to her because i have been telling her stuff like this for years. The one point i strongly disagree with (for my group at least) is that they would EVER vote for Reagan (too young, for one thing) or Bush (either one). I also don't think that the clothes were especially important... my crowd was more the Tevas and Patagonia types, not so much tie-dye & daddy's BMW crowd. 0% frat/sorority but definitely fond of the herbal remedies that seemed to go along with the Dead culture. and, i would like to add, they definitely LOVED the music.
Not that's some swinging stoner hippie tie dye San Fran Dead I can wrap my head around!


wow Outstanding Dead  : P
 kcar wrote:

And Bill's at it again in June. Wow, this sounds seriously earnest and (please don't beat me) a bit amateurish. Almost like a Top 40 cover. Were the Dead still in high school when they put this out? 

 
Not quite in high school, but it was their first album, produced in 4 days in 1967 and originally titled "San Francisco's The Grateful Dead" before they changed the title to Grateful Dead.  
 WonderLizard wrote:
Joan Osborne - Brokedown Palace
Lyle Lovett - Friend of the Devil
Los Lobos - Bertha
The Dead - The Golden Road

Inspired set.

 
And Bill's at it again in June. Wow, this sounds seriously earnest and (please don't beat me) a bit amateurish. Almost like a Top 40 cover. Were the Dead still in high school when they put this out? 
Joan Osborne - Brokedown Palace
Lyle Lovett - Friend of the Devil
Los Lobos - Bertha
The Dead - The Golden Road

Inspired set.

Yeah!  The real deal!

 

 None of this Osbone/Lovett/Lobos Axis of Evil covers drivel. 

 

Bout time!


 ckcotton wrote:

Thats pretty funny..... they wern't talking about the Dead at all....

"Well I heard mister Young sing about her
Well, I heard ole Neil put her down
Well, I hope Neil Young will remember
A Southern man don't need him around anyhow"

Reminds me of a friend who thought Steve Miller was singing about, "Big o'l Jed and Lionel" (Jet Airliner)
 
Um, you might try looking up the word "paraphrase."
 calypsus_1 wrote:

Grateful Dead - "So Many Roads" Live in Las Vegas (1994):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfGD94CchJU

"This is one of the monumental Jerry ballads from the later years"


  that's great!  Hard to find a good video of Lazy River Road, though...


{#Dancingbanana_2} {#Dancingbanana}{#Bounce}{#Bounce}{#Dance}
 jagdriver wrote:

Except that the Pranksters took the legendary bus trip to the New York World's Fair in '64 and dropped in on Dr. Tim's tripping headquarters as long as they were nearby and both camps shared a mutual fondness for Mr. Owsley. Unfortunately, Kesey and Leary had completely different ideas as to how Owley's gift to the world should best be utilized. The former thought "anytime, anywhere," and "more is more." The later treated it with more respect, given that many who saw the light were ultimately vaporized by same. 

A great read on all that is "Storming Heaven".  Even the good Dr. Leary and the Millbrook crowd got stridently messianic and lost a certain necessary perspective after just plain too many sessions.  All those clowns kind of poisoned the well for everyone, its taken like 30 years and a lot of uphill legal, political, and scientific battles by truly dedicated groups like MAPS to get the work of Stan Grof and the other _real_ consciousness researchers restarted.


 loanking wrote:

I think I speak for most Deadheads who didn't go to school in the 80's but more like the 70's and 60's when I paraphrase Lynard Skynard form Sweet Home  Alabama. "A dead fan don't need you around anyhow."

Great band, great song. Keep up the good work.


 
Thats pretty funny..... they wern't talking about the Dead at all....

"Well I heard mister Young sing about her
Well, I heard ole Neil put her down
Well, I hope Neil Young will remember
A Southern man don't need him around anyhow"

Reminds me of a friend who thought Steve Miller was singing about, "Big o'l Jed and Lionel" (Jet Airliner)

 ckcotton wrote:

Same for me... then I heard "One from the Vault" and the whole world changed..... just amazing!

 
Franklin's on One From the Vault is a 10 all the way!

 erichb wrote:


If you think deadheads are bad, you should have spent some time around Phishheads.  They made deadheads a joy to be around.
 
True DAT!

Not such a good song, is it? {#Ask}
 Mugro wrote:

I must have been a Reverse "Touch Head" then. I initially thought that the Dead sucked because all I knew was Touch of Grey. I was about 15 when that song was released as a single. Little did I know that the song had been performed live for years before that. Once I listened to the concert stuff, I was hooked. It took a bit to overcome listening to Touch of Grey on every radio station for a while though.
 
Same for me... then I heard "One from the Vault" and the whole world changed..... just amazing!

JERRY ME SOME MORE PLZ.
Okay Damien... Grab a bag of stereotypes and SPEW them out.  Sounds to me like you know absolutely nothing about the Dead or dead heads.  You just think you're being cute by flaming people you don't know on the web and you sound like the grumpy old man.  Surely there is some rock you can crawl back under.

 _Some_ people may have joined the Dead for the scene but they always stayed for the music.

 Bodhisattva wrote:
Physics genius, perhaps. Music moron, definitely. :iamwith:
 
I doubt this guy is a genius at anything.  You nailed him.

This song just Barks SF '60s. That is the very sound! Well, this and the Airplane's Pillow.

What a funky album. I read that Jerry had a hard time listening to is after the fact, outta tune and all speed up. I love it.

Grateful Dead - "So Many Roads" Live in Las Vegas (1994):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfGD94CchJU

"This is one of the monumental Jerry ballads from the later years"

I love this tune.  Hey Hey
Great song great band...
The Golden Road...so many thanks.
 damien wrote:

its like the joke goes;
Q: what did one Deadhead say to the other when they ran out of acid?
A: Man! this music BLOWS!
 

LOL  having been there (60s 70s) I disagree with almost everything Damien wrote. You had to be there.

yes the music did blow, but have you heard the shit on the air since then. nuf said.

I think I speak for most Deadheads who didn't go to school in the 80's but more like the 70's and 60's when I paraphrase Lynard Skynard form Sweet Home  Alabama. "A dead fan don't need you around anyhow."

Great band, great song. Keep up the good work.


 Jack_Jefferson wrote:


Having gone to college in the late 1980's/early 1990's, I'd have to say the majority of the "deadheads" I knew fit this profile. These same people were just looking for something to conform to. The vast majority were preppy in high school, voted for Reagan or Bush and belonged to a fraternity or sorority. They were into the dead simply for the material peripherals (drugs and clothes) and knew next to nothing about the music. Having said that, I enjoyed their music a lot at the time but did not identify myself as a deadhead mostly because I didn't want to be confused with the college-aged bandwagon deadheads.
 

I don't agree. I went to school in the same timeframe you speak of. Yes, I voted for Bush (both of them) and I would have voted for Reagan if I had been old enough.I used to hang around a lot of people who called themselves deadheads. I have been a Deadhead without the clothes or the drugs.  For me, it has always been about the music, not the scene. I have thousands of shows on tape and CD (and now MP3), but have only been to one show. I know their entire catalogue by heart and am looking forward to seeing the Dead in a few weeks (minus Jerry of course).

It is very hard to establish stereotypes because then you find that there are so many exceptions to the little stereotype construct that you have built....
 Jack_Jefferson wrote:
Having gone to college in the late 1980's/early 1990's, I'd have to say the majority of the "deadheads" I knew fit this profile. These same people were just looking for something to conform to. The vast majority were preppy in high school, voted for Reagan or Bush and belonged to a fraternity or sorority. They were into the dead simply for the material peripherals (drugs and clothes) and knew next to nothing about the music. Having said that, I enjoyed their music a lot at the time but did not identify myself as a deadhead mostly because I didn't want to be confused with the college-aged bandwagon deadheads.
 
Wow. Most of the DeadHeads I knew in college didn't fit this stereotype. Some of the DeadHeads at my school belonged to a fraternity or sorority, but I'm not sure they voted for Reagan or Bush. And they sure didn't give a shit about the "material peripherals." They just liked the music. I was in college when you were, and I can assure you we were all about the beer. The beer and the music. And the pot. That too.


 wferrier wrote:
 
 

 

There's different layers; below the Deadheads are the Pranksterites. Every Pranksterite knows who Leary was, but not many Deadheads do. But when you ask a Pranksterite what Leary was into, outside of the usual clichés, none can tell you. There once was an east coast tribe and a west coast tribe. The west coast tribe never knew what the east coast tribe was doing.  



 
Curious observation.  Why are you linking Pranksterites with Timothy Leary?  By Pranksterites I assume you mean fans and followers of Ken Kesey, like the Pranksters?  The Pranksters and Leary were not at all on the same page.  Leary saw LSD as a tool for further study of mental capacirty and functionality while the Pranksters were more light hearted and simply enjoying the experience.  To say that deadheads don't know who Leary was makes no sense.  Are all your deadhead acquaintances 15 years old or something?

 wferrier wrote:
 There's different layers; below the Deadheads are the Pranksterites. Every Pranksterite knows who Leary was, but not many Deadheads do. But when you ask a Pranksterite what Leary was into, outside of the usual clichés, none can tell you. There once was an east coast tribe and a west coast tribe. The west coast tribe never knew what the east coast tribe was doing.  
 
Except that the Pranksters took the legendary bus trip to the New York World's Fair in '64 and dropped in on Dr. Tim's tripping headquarters as long as they were nearby and both camps shared a mutual fondness for Mr. Owsley. Unfortunately, Kesey and Leary had completely different ideas as to how Owley's gift to the world should best be utilized. The former thought "anytime, anywhere," and "more is more." The later treated it with more respect, given that many who saw the light were ultimately vaporized by same.

Me, I drove my own psychedelic bus, thanks, and it wasn't all that terrific—although a multi-hued August dawn somewhere on I-80 E in Iowa with 'Trane blaring was an unforgettable sight akin to a daytime aurora borealis. I quickly discovered I preferred Dr. Tim's approach, given that—when in Rome—I find lyres, baths, frescos, wine and (lack of) togas far more appealing than chariots, lions, and senatorial assassinations.


 erichb wrote:


If you think deadheads are bad, you should have spent some time around Phishheads.  They made deadheads a joy to be around.
 

freakin gate crashers! 

 Jack_Jefferson wrote:


Having gone to college in the late 1980's/early 1990's, I'd have to say the majority of the "deadheads" I knew fit this profile. These same people were just looking for something to conform to. The vast majority were preppy in high school, voted for Reagan or Bush and belonged to a fraternity or sorority. They were into the dead simply for the material peripherals (drugs and clothes) and knew next to nothing about the music. Having said that, I enjoyed their music a lot at the time but did not identify myself as a deadhead mostly because I didn't want to be confused with the college-aged bandwagon deadheads.
  
 

 

There's different layers; below the Deadheads are the Pranksterites. Every Pranksterite knows who Leary was, but not many Deadheads do. But when you ask a Pranksterite what Leary was into, outside of the usual clichés, none can tell you. There once was an east coast tribe and a west coast tribe. The west coast tribe never knew what the east coast tribe was doing.  



 Jack_Jefferson wrote:


Having gone to college in the late 1980's/early 1990's, I'd have to say the majority of the "deadheads" I knew fit this profile. These same people were just looking for something to conform to. The vast majority were preppy in high school, voted for Reagan or Bush and belonged to a fraternity or sorority. They were into the dead simply for the material peripherals (drugs and clothes) and knew next to nothing about the music. Having said that, I enjoyed their music a lot at the time but did not identify myself as a deadhead mostly because I didn't want to be confused with the college-aged bandwagon deadheads.
 

If you think deadheads are bad, you should have spent some time around Phishheads.  They made deadheads a joy to be around.
ArbiterOfGoodTaste wrote:

Yeah, similar for me, though the songs were Casey Jones and Truckin'. Still don't really like either of those.

Always hated when they played those 2 songs.  After a while, they stopped playing them altogether-thank god.

 laozilover wrote:
First track off their first album!
 

First and last I hope {#Ask}
damien wrote:
I think the Dead never had a chance with me because of all the deadheads. It isn't so much their music, or true dead heads (whom most are in their 50s now)- it is more the bandwagon jumpers who decide to become deadheads without really listening to the band. They see the Dead subcultture, and with their pathetic need to belong to something (not enough religion in their life?) they run out, buy a crapload of tie dye and hemp clothing, stop showering and cover themselves in patchuli stink. THEN they TRY to get into the music. It is more a gimmic now than anything. But that is just me - hey, I think most harley people are dicks too! its like the joke goes; Q: what did one Deadhead say to the other when they ran out of acid? A: Man! this music BLOWS!
Having gone to college in the late 1980's/early 1990's, I'd have to say the majority of the "deadheads" I knew fit this profile. These same people were just looking for something to conform to. The vast majority were preppy in high school, voted for Reagan or Bush and belonged to a fraternity or sorority. They were into the dead simply for the material peripherals (drugs and clothes) and knew next to nothing about the music. Having said that, I enjoyed their music a lot at the time but did not identify myself as a deadhead mostly because I didn't want to be confused with the college-aged bandwagon deadheads.
I grew up hearing this from 'Skeletons From the Closet' (and still have the vinyl); among others of the time...great period, great music.
erichb wrote:
Phish followed by GD: It's hippie hour at radio paradise
It's OK, it's cool, join us. Dance around the sun!
Phish followed by GD: It's hippie hour at radio paradise
If it's dead, bury it.
Mugro wrote:
I must have been a Reverse "Touch Head" then. I initially thought that the Dead sucked because all I knew was Touch of Grey. I was about 15 when that song was released as a single. Little did I know that the song had been performed live for years before that. Once I listened to the concert stuff, I was hooked. It took a bit to overcome listening to Touch of Grey on every radio station for a while though.
Yeah, similar for me, though the songs were Casey Jones and Truckin'. Still don't really like either of those.
ArbiterOfGoodTaste wrote: I must have been a Reverse "Touch Head" then. I initially thought that the Dead sucked because all I knew was Touch of Grey. I was about 15 when that song was released as a single. Little did I know that the song had been performed live for years before that. Once I listened to the concert stuff, I was hooked. It took a bit to overcome listening to Touch of Grey on every radio station for a while though.
mefrombrazil wrote:
I prefer TOUCH OF GREY.
They've got a name for your type.
dogpound wrote:
it's hippie hour here at RP :sad:
YES. LET'S TURN OFF
it's hippie hour here at RP :sad:
I prefer TOUCH OF GREY.
:sunny: First track off their first album! :dance: :dancingbanana:
damien wrote:
I think the Dead never had a chance with me because of all the deadheads. It isn't so much their music, or true dead heads (whom most are in their 50s now)- it is more the bandwagon jumpers who decide to become deadheads without really listening to the band. They see the Dead subcultture, and with their pathetic need to belong to something (not enough religion in their life?) they run out, buy a crapload of tie dye and hemp clothing, stop showering and cover themselves in patchuli stink. THEN they TRY to get into the music. It is more a gimmic now than anything. But that is just me - hey, I think most harley people are dicks too! its like the joke goes; Q: what did one Deadhead say to the other when they ran out of acid? A: Man! this music BLOWS!
Envy is a sad thing. I was never a Dead Head though I've been to several of their concerts. I think much of their music (this song, Bertha, many others) are terrific and some are trite and boring. But to take such an attitude toward people who loved the music and enjoyed the community smacks of cynical envy. Take it or leave it, let others do the same.
Awesome!!!!!!!!!
this track hasn't aged well and I actually like The Dead.
:cool: Wow! First track on first album! :dance:
fractalv wrote:
In fact, it was the people that only followed the dead and had nothing else in their lives that I felt the worst about.
Nothing else in their lives? My life was beautiful, whole and complete while I followed the Dead. No need for you to have felt badly for us, but thanks for caring.
This sounds a bit punkish.
damien wrote:
I think the Dead never had a chance with me because of all the deadheads. It isn't so much their music, or true dead heads (whom most are in their 50s now)- it is more the bandwagon jumpers who decide to become deadheads without really listening to the band. They see the Dead subcultture, and with their pathetic need to belong to something (not enough religion in their life?) they run out, buy a crapload of tie dye and hemp clothing, stop showering and cover themselves in patchuli stink. THEN they TRY to get into the music. It is more a gimmic now than anything. But that is just me - hey, I think most harley people are dicks too! its like the joke goes; Q: what did one Deadhead say to the other when they ran out of acid? A: Man! this music BLOWS!
For me, it is not about Deadheads. It is about the music. Yes, perhaps there was a great community created by the Dead and their tours, but the lasting thing for me is the music. The music, and how it makes me feel. Damien, it sounds like you never got deep into the music or the Deadhead culture. That is fine, that is your choice. It is not mandatory to like the Dead or their music. However, don't trivialize it, because it happened and the Dead's music has endured despite the death of a lot of its members and despite the fact that they were never a big seller of hit records. As for the music. Just listen to it. Really listen. And don't just listen to Touch of Grey or Friend of the Devil. Listen to their American folk background with songs like Deep Ellem. Listen to their amazing melodies like Eyes of the World. I listened to Eyes of the World on my way into the office this morning and it turned my whole mood around. If after you really listen to the deep cuts, and you still don't like the music, then fine. That is ok. But don't judge it until you have given it a chance!
SWEET! :sunny.gif: \:D/
basslice wrote:
Your comments are absolutely Dead-On. I always thought that Nirvana was nothing but a Greatful Dead rip-off / tribute band. They obvisouly stole all their riffs and style from The Dead! I don't believ they ever gave props to the Dead in their liner notes either...
Huh? They sound nothing like one another! what the heck are you talking about? Must beat you now :beat:
Not my favorite Dead song, nor my favorite Dead album. But it is probably my most favorite from this LP. Actually, I had purchased "Anthem of the Sun" first, and was hoping this LP was like that.
fractalv wrote:
.... This discussion may not belong here, but I think there was a positive net result of the existance of the dead and the social community that grew around the shows. It was for only a short time that I ever considered myself a deadhead, and don't consider myself one now, but hearing a dead song on the radio still makes me smile, if only because it brings back good memories and lifts my spirits, and isn't that part of why people listen to music at all?
I quite agree. I consistently saw a kinship there, through the music, that I've never seen anywhere else. Although there are some small elements of it here at Paradise on the forums. The band and the community did bring something positive to the world. And their music still lifts my spirits as well.
mrmojorisin wrote:
Still don't get the Dead.
You don't get the Dead, you just either get on the bus, or off the bus.
mrmojorisin wrote:
Still don't get the Dead.
mojo STFU
Still don't get the Dead.
ankhara99 wrote:
Ya know, I've listened to the Dead for a LONG time now, and except for people who want to buy drugs at the concerts, I've not seen a lot of people like you're talking about. Just because a band's music and message transcends a generational gap doesn't mean that those of us under 50 are bandwagon jumpers. I find your simplistic explanation more than a little offensive. My guess is, you've never been to a Dead show, so you really don't understand the culture and therefore have no basis to talk about why people are into it. It sounds like you got dumped by a hippie chick and never got over it, Although I do agree that body odor an patchouli are just a BAD combination all around!!
Actually, I think it depends on where you went to see them. I too have been to many dead shows, and I have seen some of the people damien wrote about, mostly in Los Angeles, San Diego and Vegas, but never were they a majority, or even a significant minority in the group. In fact, it was the people that only followed the dead and had nothing else in their lives that I felt the worst about. This discussion may not belong here, but I think there was a positive net result of the existance of the dead and the social community that grew around the shows. It was for only a short time that I ever considered myself a deadhead, and don't consider myself one now, but hearing a dead song on the radio still makes me smile, if only because it brings back good memories and lifts my spirits, and isn't that part of why people listen to music at all?
damien wrote:
I think the Dead never had a chance with me because of all the deadheads. It isn't so much their music, or true dead heads (whom most are in their 50s now)- it is more the bandwagon jumpers who decide to become deadheads without really listening to the band. They see the Dead subcultture, and with their pathetic need to belong to something (not enough religion in their life?) they run out, buy a crapload of tie dye and hemp clothing, stop showering and cover themselves in patchuli stink. THEN they TRY to get into the music. It is more a gimmic now than anything. But that is just me - hey, I think most harley people are dicks too! its like the joke goes; Q: what did one Deadhead say to the other when they ran out of acid? A: Man! this music BLOWS!
Ya know, I've listened to the Dead for a LONG time now, and except for people who want to buy drugs at the concerts, I've not seen a lot of people like you're talking about. Just because a band's music and message transcends a generational gap doesn't mean that those of us under 50 are bandwagon jumpers. I find your simplistic explanation more than a little offensive. My guess is, you've never been to a Dead show, so you really don't understand the culture and therefore have no basis to talk about why people are into it. It sounds like you got dumped by a hippie chick and never got over it, Although I do agree that body odor an patchouli are just a BAD combination all around!!
Sounds aged now but still good to hear every once in a while.
Speedy.
I think the Dead never had a chance with me because of all the deadheads. It isn't so much their music, or true dead heads (whom most are in their 50s now)- it is more the bandwagon jumpers who decide to become deadheads without really listening to the band. They see the Dead subcultture, and with their pathetic need to belong to something (not enough religion in their life?) they run out, buy a crapload of tie dye and hemp clothing, stop showering and cover themselves in patchuli stink. THEN they TRY to get into the music. It is more a gimmic now than anything. But that is just me - hey, I think most harley people are dicks too! its like the joke goes; Q: what did one Deadhead say to the other when they ran out of acid? A: Man! this music BLOWS!
I hate to give a Dead tune a low rating but I'm not much of a fan of their first album. This is a curiosity at best.
nolands wrote:
I couldn't help it, I got to the page and no one had rated it yet, so just for that one brief moment in time, I got to see a Dead song with a 1 rating average. ahhh....
I can only hope to do the same one day. Aw shucks... I'll give it a 1 right now and hit the mute button.
physicsgenius wrote:
Grateful Dead = Boringest. Band. EVAR. Except for Touch of Grey.
Physics genius, perhaps. Music moron, definitely. :iamwith:
Grateful Dead = Boringest. Band. EVAR. Except for Touch of Grey.
basslice wrote:
There's something to be said for the Dead. I say it is a decent song from a decent band. Maybe a bit overrated. Going against long held Deadhead mantras, Jerry was not God...
Well, if Jerry isn't God, then I'm not sure who is. He had that special something.
A fun song from a fun band. Good to hear some actual Dead after the Los Lobos cover of Bertha we just heard.
Zeke19 wrote:
This song would be a pretty obscure but for its status as the first track on 'Skeletons in the Closet.'
You just had to be there......
Zeke19 wrote:
This song would be a pretty obscure but for its status as the first track on 'Skeletons in the Closet.'
It's also the first track on the Dead's first album. Take a vacation, fall out for a while, Summer's comin' in, and it's goin' outa style! :D :D :D
basslice wrote:
Your comments are absolutely Dead-On. I always thought that Nirvana was nothing but a Greatful Dead rip-off / tribute band. They obvisouly stole all their riffs and style from The Dead! I don't believ they ever gave props to the Dead in their liner notes either...
He said facetiously.
Your comments are absolutely Dead-On. I always thought that Nirvana was nothing but a Greatful Dead rip-off / tribute band. They obvisouly stole all their riffs and style from The Dead! I don't believ they ever gave props to the Dead in their liner notes either... black321 wrote:
Hearing Nirvana's smells like teen spirit after the golden road, i was stunned by the similarity between the two songs in terms of energy and the feel of two young bands. I wonder what this song might have been if the dead were given the equipment and producing talents of the modern day.
Hearing Nirvana's smells like teen spirit after the golden road, i was stunned by the similarity between the two songs in terms of energy and the feel of two young bands. I wonder what this song might have been if the dead were given the equipment and producing talents of the modern day.
There's something to be said for the Dead. I say it is a decent song from a decent band. Maybe a bit overrated. Going against long held Deadhead mantras, Jerry was not God...
This song would be a pretty obscure but for its status as the first track on 'Skeletons in the Closet.'
Driving down Mission St. in San Rafael one warm, spring afternoon in 1967, a senior in high school, and on comes "The Golden Road"--by our Dead! On AM radio! Yowsuh! Of course I hit the brakes in the middle of the road so not to miss a note. Heaven--and not a few irate, horn leaning drivers behind me. What did they know...
I couldn't help it, I got to the page and no one had rated it yet, so just for that one brief moment in time, I got to see a Dead song with a 1 rating average. ahhh....