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Majid Bekkas — Dayamallah
Album: African Gnaoua Blues
Avg rating:
5.9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 328









Released: 2003
Length: 6:57
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(no lyrics available)
Comments (16)add comment
Awful. Tuneless, repetitive, lyrics don't make any sense. Awful.
Must say I am surprised with the amount of "1" marks. This may not be the top of the world-music, but it is far, far away from bad. Or worst. Is it because it is not in English?

Anyway, I really liked it. For those who are interested in this style, check out Anouar Brahem.
This is one of the main reasons I love RP! Beautiful and different. Where else am I going to hear this? I do also love that you play a fair amount of Zeppelin and everything in between. Best radio station in the world!
This is wonderful many thanks!
{#Hearteyes}
many thanks Bill and Becky
this music elevates the overall diversity and therefore appeal of your offerings as art
 faramir wrote:
I love Middle Eastern music, but this certainly doesn't represent (to my *limited* viewpoint) the best of the Middle East. Good, but not particularly outstanding. I am surprised at its selection. If you like something more lively but similar (traditional), try Richard Hagopian or Austin natives Kamran Hooshmand & Thousand-and-One Nights. For Arab-based world beat, try Cheb Mami. For (Sephardic) Jewish-based world beat, try Natacha Atlas or Ofra Haza (mostly very Euro though). Turkish dance, try Tarkan.
 
I like this Dayamallah, and I want to thank faramir for mentioning some other sounds to explore, Peace All!
This is not dissimilar to Tinariwen's music. Is Bekkas also Tuareg? Please excuse my ignorance :(

Thanks again to RP for regularly leavening the anglo-saxon music mix with music from non-anglo cultures across the world. This station is never less than intriguing... :)
DAYAMALLAH!!!!! 
 anonymous wrote:


So listen and learn I for one am thankful that the entire planet does not speak English.
 
Take a listen to the tongue in cheek song by the Mutton Birds called "The Queen's English" they made a hell of a fist of this sentiment.
:clap: e c l e c t i c
aharamanx wrote:
So listen and learn :wink: I for one am thankful that the entire planet does not speak English.
Well said, beauty does not have a language...Incredible music, very traditional but carying a modern aire...
bluedot wrote:
i liked it at first, but it's too long, especially since it's in a language, which, while beautiful, is basically incomprehensible to me.
So listen and learn :wink: I for one am thankful that the entire planet does not speak English.
I thoughtthis was going to be from the Scott Simpson David Hidalgo album from the opening notes. Sounds pretty interesting, although I agree that the flute in this piece might be extraneous. While we're on the subject, why not play some tunes from the Simpson Hidalgo album. It's a beautiful album start to finish.
Not exactly morning after St. Paddys day music. #-o The flute felt like a saw cutting through my head.
I love Middle Eastern music, but this certainly doesn't represent (to my *limited* viewpoint) the best of the Middle East. Good, but not particularly outstanding. I am surprised at its selection. If you like something more lively but similar (traditional), try Richard Hagopian or Austin natives Kamran Hooshmand & Thousand-and-One Nights. For Arab-based world beat, try Cheb Mami. For (Sephardic) Jewish-based world beat, try Natacha Atlas or Ofra Haza (mostly very Euro though). Turkish dance, try Tarkan.
i liked it at first, but it's too long, especially since it's in a language, which, while beautiful, is basically incomprehensible to me.