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Pink Floyd — The Final Cut
Album: The Final Cut
Avg rating:
7.4

Your rating:
Total ratings: 274









Released: 1983
Length: 4:48
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Through the fish-eyed lens of tear stained eyes
I can barely define the shape of this moment in time
And far from flying high in clear blue skies
I'm spiraling down to the hole in the ground where I hide

If you negotiate the minefield in the drive
And beat the dogs and cheat the cold electronic eyes
And if you make it past the shotguns in the hall
Dial the combination, open the priesthole
And if I'm in I'll tell you what's behind [[Pink Floyd:The Wall (1979)|the wall]] ''[gunshot which obscures "the wall"]''

There's a kid who had a big hallucination
Making love to girls in magazines
He wonders if you're sleeping with your new found faith
Could anybody love him or is it just a crazy dream

And if I show you my dark side
Will you still hold me tonight?
And if I open my heart to you
And show you my weak side
What would you do?

Would you sell your story to Rolling Stone?
Would you take the children away and leave me alone?
And smile in reassurance as you whisper down the phone
Would you send me packing or would you take me home?

Thought I oughta bare my naked feelings
Thought I oughta tear the curtain down
I held the blade in trembling hands
Prepared to make it but
Just then the phone rang
I never had the nerve to make the final cut

''"Hello? Listen, I think I've got it. Okay, listen. It's a... Ha ha ha!"''
Comments (70)add comment

Pink Floyd Meddle by ~JSaurer
©2008-2010 ~JSaurer

Same ol', same ol'.
These guys have done some of the greatest music of the 20th century, but this is a steaming pile of shit. Sounds like a lot of the self-indulgent nonsense on Waters' solo Radio Chaos.
So emotional, incredible. Even when Waters keeps Gilmour locked out of a song, still the song is damn good due to the emotion.
One of the greatst bands there ever was. People I give you Pink Floyed. :) Rodger Waters did Amused to Death witch was about the state of the world in the early 90s late 80s Maybe thats the war one your thinking of
Listened to this album, and this song, many, many times ... ah, memories! federico
ArbiterOfGoodTaste wrote:
And with all the wonderful album covers they'd had, what's with this one?
I think Waters did it himself ...
I've been through this album a few times, but the songs seem to retread places Floyd'd already been... And with all the wonderful album covers they'd had, what's with this one?
Was this album in response to the Faukland Islands Conflict with Argentina?
I Can't believe that we have LOTS of songs with 8+ and this amazing Floyd piece is 7.3 wow OScar
Awwww. wow... who'd have thought Final Cut on RP. I am truly not worthy, instant 10 for such a great album :notworthy:
panlad wrote:
Nik- Thanks for your intelligent words. It's refreshing to see someone with a clear knowledge of the band and their music instead of the usual garbage that gets posted at RP. I connected with this album as a teenager and still find it very moving. PF really influenced the way I think about and write music.
highschool, the first gulf war, lots of nuclear war talk... I remember dreaming that a bomb had hit North Dakota (the state south of us here in Manitoba Canada) This album was very deep to me then still poigant today.
Not really what I think of when I think of Floyd. It was a staple in the dorms in college in the 80s, but I had largely forgotten it. It actually holds up pretty well. Thanks RP.
damien wrote:
I just am not capable of enjoying Pink Floyd's music.
There is medication that can help with this condition.
damien wrote:
I just am not capable of enjoying Pink Floyd's music.
You have our condolences.
A 10 :notworthy:
This song makes me cry... everytime. So powerful! :clap:
Roger Waters is genius! A little sociopathic and a tad scary, but GENIUS!
great song! It's been like 10 years!
Got to check this one out!
Jeepers. I think those of us who didn't sign up for the Serious Postmodern Rock Appreciation and Its Socio-Political Ramifications With Regard to Personal Psycho-Social Introspection course for credit might want to step out for a smoke. Except I don't smoke. Anything. But I might have to start.
Oh... My... God! Couldn't believe it when I was sitting down with some coffee to read the paper, Radio Paradise on and I hear the opening line "Through the fisheyed lens of tear-stained eyes..." :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy: Thanks again RP! This is an awesome track and one that I don't think I have ever heard on any kind of radio! :D
I just am not capable of enjoying Pink Floyd's music.
One of my first and favorite PF albums. I don't think I've ever heard this outside my personal collection - thanks RP.
Nik- Thanks for your intelligent words. It's refreshing to see someone with a clear knowledge of the band and their music instead of the usual garbage that gets posted at RP. I connected with this album as a teenager and still find it very moving. PF really influenced the way I think about and write music. nikcastellan wrote:
Once again, I'm floored to hear RP pull out such a gem. I don't think I've ever heard this song out of context - played anywhere except on a stereo spinning the album. It's astonishing the effect it has, even removed from the slow-burn build of the entire album. To those who see this song (and the album in general) as a Roger Waters, solo... I'd only say - go listen to Roger's solo albums! There's simply no denying David Gilmour's contribution. It may be a little more subtle in places, but even on this tune, the climax of which is the tell-tale Gilmour explotion of emotion, it's undeniable. ("Fletcher Memorial Home" and "The Postware Dream" are other excellnt pairings of the two, along with the more ovbious "Not Now John" and the undeniable simple eloquence of the guitar work on the last track.) And as for it being derivative or a "copy" of "The Wall" - as some have pointed out and others have perhaps rightly observed - this is in many ways the "third disc" of "The Wall", but "The Final Cut" has a focus and a personal intimacy that trumps even "The Wall" - and this song is an excellent example. Perhaps this intense focus is part of what contributes to the "solo album" feel - how could such a cogent, deeply personal album be the work of a group? But the project seems so much an outgrowth of where nearly everyone in Floyd went with "The Wall." Yes, Rick Wright is missing, but Michael Kamen - who is in so many ways the "5th Beatle" on "The Wall" - fills in admirably and even appropriately, as the piano and keys work to completely integrate his dead-on orchestration. Just as his work on "The Wall" made it a Floyd album unlike any other. But you don't hear people complaining that "The Wall" was just a glorified Roger Waters rant draped in Kamen strings and brass... It's impossible to hear "The Final Cut" and not think of Pink Floyd. And no disrespect to the guitarists that Roger Waters teamed with later (hard to knock Eric Clapton...) but it's something very different from anything he did after, and something very much apart of all he'd done before. That said, this is perhaps one of the most moving concept albums to come out of the prog-rock 70's/80's school of composition. Call it a solo album or Floyd's swan-song, either way it stands just as well on it's own - removed from everything that came before or after. At once a staggering comment on post-war Thatcherite England, a memorial to the generation that lived (and suffered) before, and all the while a blisteringly personal testament to grief and frustration on so many levels. The melding of compostion, of lyric, of music to serve these themes is nearly flawless. Floyd was never a group with virtuouso vocal ability, but Roger Waters (and yes, David Guilmore as well) put their voices to such effect, in so many varied ways, you feel that every possible nuance is being employed, and always for a reason. Never just because... I'll admit, when I first heard this album, it was far from an instant attration. I heard elements of "The Wall" and thought they were repeating themselves. I knew the popular wisdom about tension in the band, about the clash of egos and ideas... It's not an album that comes easily to most, and with so much baggage attached, many are simply unwilling to take the time required to appreciate the work. But for those who do, it's well worth it. And RP is certainly a place where this sort of music belongs...
Tarindel wrote:
I'd love to hear more PF cuts off this album. It's a great album, and sadly underplayed since it lives in the shadow of PFs 70's albums.
I agree ... very underplayed. I was shocked to hear it played here even ... thanks, RP ... it's been years since I've heard any songs from this album.
I'd love to hear more PF cuts off this album. It's a great album, and sadly underplayed since it lives in the shadow of PFs 70's albums.
Once again, I'm floored to hear RP pull out such a gem. I don't think I've ever heard this song out of context - played anywhere except on a stereo spinning the album. It's astonishing the effect it has, even removed from the slow-burn build of the entire album. To those who see this song (and the album in general) as a Roger Waters, solo... I'd only say - go listen to Roger's solo albums! There's simply no denying David Gilmour's contribution. It may be a little more subtle in places, but even on this tune, the climax of which is the tell-tale Gilmour explotion of emotion, it's undeniable. ("Fletcher Memorial Home" and "The Postware Dream" are other excellnt pairings of the two, along with the more ovbious "Not Now John" and the undeniable simple eloquence of the guitar work on the last track.) And as for it being derivative or a "copy" of "The Wall" - as some have pointed out and others have perhaps rightly observed - this is in many ways the "third disc" of "The Wall", but "The Final Cut" has a focus and a personal intimacy that trumps even "The Wall" - and this song is an excellent example. Perhaps this intense focus is part of what contributes to the "solo album" feel - how could such a cogent, deeply personal album be the work of a group? But the project seems so much an outgrowth of where nearly everyone in Floyd went with "The Wall." Yes, Rick Wright is missing, but Michael Kamen - who is in so many ways the "5th Beatle" on "The Wall" - fills in admirably and even appropriately, as the piano and keys work to completely integrate his dead-on orchestration. Just as his work on "The Wall" made it a Floyd album unlike any other. But you don't hear people complaining that "The Wall" was just a glorified Roger Waters rant draped in Kamen strings and brass... It's impossible to hear "The Final Cut" and not think of Pink Floyd. And no disrespect to the guitarists that Roger Waters teamed with later (hard to knock Eric Clapton...) but it's something very different from anything he did after, and something very much apart of all he'd done before. That said, this is perhaps one of the most moving concept albums to come out of the prog-rock 70's/80's school of composition. Call it a solo album or Floyd's swan-song, either way it stands just as well on it's own - removed from everything that came before or after. At once a staggering comment on post-war Thatcherite England, a memorial to the generation that lived (and suffered) before, and all the while a blisteringly personal testament to grief and frustration on so many levels. The melding of compostion, of lyric, of music to serve these themes is nearly flawless. Floyd was never a group with virtuouso vocal ability, but Roger Waters (and yes, David Guilmore as well) put their voices to such effect, in so many varied ways, you feel that every possible nuance is being employed, and always for a reason. Never just because... I'll admit, when I first heard this album, it was far from an instant attration. I heard elements of "The Wall" and thought they were repeating themselves. I knew the popular wisdom about tension in the band, about the clash of egos and ideas... It's not an album that comes easily to most, and with so much baggage attached, many are simply unwilling to take the time required to appreciate the work. But for those who do, it's well worth it. And RP is certainly a place where this sort of music belongs...
Trustocity wrote:
> masterhead wrote: > Well it is good to sing and talk about your life, but living in a constant > ego-trip is not sane. What an ignorant thing to say. I'm not slamming you, simply pointing out how obvious it is that you aren't an artist of ANY kind. You'd do best to trust the professionals as to matters of sanity, ego and philosophical craftsmanship.
Well, he's not totally wrong. Matters of sanity and ego matter very much when you're in a *band*. Pink Floyd have had some experience in that area, anybody remember Syd Barrett? If there is one band member who can't get over some childhood experience, or who tries to make his personal anguish the main focus of the band, then there may be good reason to part with him. Unfortunately the Floyd got rid of both their geniuses (for perfectly understandable reasons), and after that their music hasn't been as haunting / gripping / wonderful as before.
Mark1970 wrote:
Am I hearing things or is the keyboard in the background playing something very similar to the keyboard part in Comfortably Numb?
Much of it was written during or close after The Wall and parts of it almost serve thematically as a "Dénouement" to that album. Should be required listening for the multitude of Wallbangers that may have never paid much attention to this one.
Mark1970 wrote:
Am I hearing things or is the keyboard in the background playing something very similar to the keyboard part in Comfortably Numb?
I totally had that impression - the orchestral tracks have the same swirling melody The guitar is great - as always from Mr. Gilmour - but I generally prefer Gilmour lead vocals and guitar with Waters driving bass and lyrics as a package.
masterhead wrote:
Well it is good to sing and talk about your life, but living in a constant ego-trip is not sane.
What an ignorant thing to say. I'm not slamming you, simply pointing out how obvious it is that you aren't an artist of ANY kind. You'd do best to trust the professionals as to matters of sanity, ego and philosophical craftsmanship.
Zygomatic wrote:
I love the opening lyrics to this song. Thanks RP! To the "self indulgent" posters: What is wrong with being self-indulgent as a songwriter? If you knew much about Roger Waters, you'd reallize how important that the subject matter of this album is to him. What is wrong with someone expressing themselves through their music? Not a damn thing.
Well it is good to sing and talk about your life, but living in a constant ego-trip is not sane.
Am I hearing things or is the keyboard in the background playing something very similar to the keyboard part in Comfortably Numb?
Please get an original copy of this song that wasn't encoded in Windows Media. It sounds like crap.
Words have no meaning when the Floyd is on...even with this, the first unofficial Roger Waters solo album.... Spectacular. :notworthy:
phineas wrote:
Ah, that's the joe1 we all know and loathe! insertlaughingoutloudsmileyherebutnotreallybecausejoe1issosensitiveaboutthemthewankingtosser!
Yeppers.
I don't know why everyone always dismisses The Final Cut. I think it is a really good album. Depressing as all Hell, but good. Glad to hear you play it Bill.
The wars are the same. Just the politicians names have been changed...
Thanks for giving me chills on an otherwise warm morning. ;)
The Final Cut is definitely one of those albums you have to be in the mood for, or at least in a "mood altered state." Whatever the case, it is one of the best. Thankyou for taking me back... :daisy.gif:
:music:
David Gilmour. :notworthy:
joe1 wrote:
Time?....Are you for real? You are talking bollocks...Please wake up and stop taking crap drugs... You are spouting toe-curlingly bad drug induced wank there!......goodnight and sleep it off.... Either that or get something that resembles a life....ok?
Ah, that's the joe1 we all know and loathe! insertlaughingoutloudsmileyherebutnotreallybecausejoe1issosensitiveaboutthemthewankingtosser!
Zygomatic wrote:
...To the "self indulgent" posters: What is wrong with being self-indulgent as a songwriter? If you knew much about Roger Waters, you'd reallize how important that the subject matter of this album is to him. What is wrong with someone expressing themselves through their music? Not a damn thing.
Of course there's nothing wrong with being self indulgent as an artist. To some extend all art is such. But that doesn't mean it is interesting. When the self-indulgence overwhelms the expression, or when it is pure self-indulgence expressed in an uninteresting way, as I think is happening here, there's not a damn thing wrong with moving on.
Time?....Are you for real? You are talking bollocks...Please wake up and stop taking crap drugs... You are spouting toe-curlingly bad drug induced wank there!......goodnight and sleep it off.... Either that or get something that resembles a life....ok?
This is the most raw, moving album of all time. It is a painfully intimate look into the life of another. But, like all things, it is entirely subjective. Looking from your own personal experience, you may empathize with this. But, if it outside your scope of experience, you may respond to it with indifference. I also feel that if it touches a part of you that you don't want to face, you may even respond to it with anymosity.
This really is nostalgic wank....Sorry....but it is really crap.....
ENS3 wrote:
It surely is a personal thing. Listen to 'When the Tigers broke free.' Hurts me every time.
Damn, I missed it, always makes me feel nostalgically melancholic.....
It surely is a personal thing. Listen to 'When the Tigers broke free.' Hurts me every time.
I love this song! Both lyrics and music. It always touches me, it's so recognizable. The song feels very close, makes me feel kind of 'safe'.
I love the opening lyrics to this song. Thanks RP! To the "self indulgent" posters: What is wrong with being self-indulgent as a songwriter? If you knew much about Roger Waters, you'd reallize how important that the subject matter of this album is to him. What is wrong with someone expressing themselves through their music? Not a damn thing.
Turn up the volume! :clap: this makes me feel at home. :music: Been to this concert in Amsterdam, and though I like PF's Wish You Were Here period more, this is exceptionally good to hear.
One of my favorite songs, from my favorite band. This album is too forgotten IMHO. True, Wright was not there, and you can feel the "Roger Waters & Backing band" vibe. But it contains brilliant songwriting, arrengements, as well as some of Gilmour's brightest guitar work.
tomcadorette wrote:
Amen. When I was a teenager, I loved Pink Floyd. That was a couple of decades and some change ago. But now... well, let's just say sometimes music doesn't age well.
Wow.. I've always said that Pink Floyd ages amazingly well. I listen to Wish You Were Here all the time and it never seems old to me. Same for Dark Side of the Moon. I think the problem with albums like The Wall and The Final Cut, which are more operatic works, is that many of the tracks don't work very well when taken out of centext and played alone.
BooKitty wrote:
IMHO this is self-indulgent bs
Why is everything that is self indulgent, BS. This is self indulgent, but it is also good.
BooKitty wrote:
IMHO this is self-indulgent bs
Amen. When I was a teenager, I loved Pink Floyd. That was a couple of decades and some change ago. But now... well, let's just say sometimes music doesn't age well.
IMHO this is self-indulgent bs
Cheer up Rog!!
Even as a serious Floydophile, this album stands out as a Waters solo album. Still powerful, haunting, and beautiful, though.
... its good, it could have been better if waters had put forth some effort to restrain his pretension...
A raw nerve left exposed after a slashing wound opened on your face...that is the best way I have of describing this album. So often overlooked, but worthy of a listen.
The phrase 'deeply personal expression' (which is a euphemism for something so indulgent that only the artist should ever experience it) comes to mind.
Wow! More, please...
WOW, thanks for playing this! Yeah it's a RW solo album but that is fine. Roger may be an asshole but has such a way with words that I've never come across before. Amused to Death is one of my top 10 all time fav albums. S
Every time I listen to this song, I get deeply moved, literally moved, regardless of the criticism against this album (of which I think many are justifiable and right). I believe this particular song is the pinnacle of Roger Waters' expression (both music- and lyrics-wise), of his apparently lifelong obsession with alienation and loneliness. Roger's vocal shows, so does the calm but eloquent, excellent guitar solo by Dave. Really, almost desperately wish they get together again and make more music -- musically they cannnot live without each other.
This album is a personal favorite of mine, it has the same "epic story" kinda feel that The Wall has. The music is great, but it's the story the music tells that really moves you.
I tend to agree. With the exception of "Not Now John" (Which I think is an excelent Gilmour song), it basically was a RW solo album. There still was some good stuff on the album, and this was one of those songs.
This album has been (rightly) regarded as being all but a Roger Waters solo outing, as he dominates the project with his wistful ruminations. My first listens left me with the impression that this music sounded like "Wall" leftovers but over time I have appreciated the outrage on display, even if it does get a bit didactic towards the end of the album. This title track is representative and lacerating.