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Elton John — Mona Lisas And Mad Hatters
Album: Honky Chateau
Avg rating:
7.8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1182









Released: 1972
Length: 4:55
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Now I know
"Spanish Harlem" are not just pretty words to say
I thought I knew
But now I know that rose trees never grow in New York City

Until you've seen this trash-can dream come true
You stand at the edge while people run you through
And I thank the Lord there's people out there like you
I thank the Lord there's people out there like you

While Mona Lisas and mad hatters
Sons of bankers, sons of lawyers
Turn around and say good morning to the night
For unless they see the sky
But they can't and that is why
They know not if it's dark outside or light

This Broadway's got
It's got a lot of songs to sing
If I knew the tunes I might join in
I go my way alone
Grow my own, my own seeds shall be sown in New York City
Subway's no way for a good man to go down
Rich man can ride and the hobo, he can drown
And I thank the Lord for the people I have found
I thank the Lord for the people I have found

While Mona Lisas and mad hatters
Sons of bankers, sons of lawyers
Turn around and say good morning to the night
For unless they see the sky
But they can't and that is why
They know not if it's dark outside or light

And now I know
"Spanish Harlem" are not just pretty words to say
I thought I knew
But now I know that rose trees never grow in New York City
Subway's no way for a good man to go down
Rich man can ride and the hobo, he can drown
And I thank the Lord for the people I have found
I thank the Lord for the people I have found

While Mona Lisas and mad hatters
Sons of bankers, sons of lawyers
Turn around and say good morning to the night
For unless they see the sky
But they can't and that is why
They know not if it's dark outside or light

They know not if it's dark outside or light
Comments (154)add comment
Long Live                                                                               Radio Paradise
My rating:                                                                    8 - Most Excellent  
 kingart wrote:
Elton in classic mode. His songs rang with priceless sincerity. There was no one better in these years, long before he became caricature of himself, and FM radio annihilated his artistry with endless repetitions of the execrable Bennie and the Jets. 
 

"Priceless sincerety."  That's it!
 cc_rider wrote:

Stevie Wonder is another whose later work (Ebony and Ivory?) never matched his earlier stuff. But both of them are still amazing performers, and really seem to enjoy playing the music that made them famous (and rich).
 
Like Neil Young said ... "it's ALL about the music."

 kingart wrote:
Elton in classic mode. His songs rang with priceless sincerity. There was no one better in these years, long before he became caricature of himself, and FM radio annihilated his artistry with endless repetitions of the execrable Bennie and the Jets. 
 

 Highlowsel wrote:

I get what you're saying, and I agree.  But it's a measure of how far the man, the artist, fell, from those tremendous days to the later, inspired, character he became. 

I'm not being overly critical; the entire arch of his career has been a good one.  The stuff from which dreams are made.  But I guess from my point of view the brilliance of his early years was never exceeded.  It's like his beginnings amounted to a supernova explosion of creativity, and everything else that rippled out from that initial explosion were just ripples, albeit still impressive one.  It was when he began to flaunt himself that he lost me.  I moved on to other styles of music. 

I suppose it's the problem experienced by most who attain their desires?.  Live the dream once, then chase it forever?

So it goes.

Highlow
American Net'Zen

 
I seriously doubt that Sir Elton feels that he has been chasing anything since these early recordings.  He has explored new areas, been knighted, made new fans, and experimented with various genre.  It is true that folks that loved his earlier work may not have been as impressed with later efforts.  Fortunately for him that is probably irrelevant.  The problem may be that it is the observer who can't get over the flash of the original bang, not the cause of the explosion.  This does not even touch on the fact that it was far easier to touch many and be ubiquitous in the 1970s, with terrestrial radio being the primary outlet, compared to today. 
 
As I've said before on these boards, Eltons last 3 albums (written with Bernie Taupin, cowriter of this classic)  are as good as any of his past work in their own way.  You just wont know that unless you go looking through the haystack that is modern music.
 Highlowsel wrote:

I get what you're saying, and I agree.  But it's a measure of how far the man, the artist, fell, from those tremendous days to the later, inspired, character he became. 

I'm not being overly critical; the entire arch of his career has been a good one.  The stuff from which dreams are made.  But I guess from my point of view the brilliance of his early years was never exceeded.  It's like his beginnings amounted to a supernova explosion of creativity, and everything else that rippled out from that initial explosion were just ripples, albeit still impressive one.  It was when he began to flaunt himself that he lost me.  I moved on to other styles of music. 

I suppose it's the problem experienced by most who attain their desires?.  Live the dream once, then chase it forever?

So it goes.

Highlow
American Net'Zen

 
Stevie Wonder is another whose later work (Ebony and Ivory?) never matched his earlier stuff. But both of them are still amazing performers, and really seem to enjoy playing the music that made them famous (and rich).
 unclehud wrote:
This album goes a long way towards perfection: good melodies, excellent lyrics, nice variety of song styles, and an amazing group of talented musicians like drummer Nigel Olsson.

Anyone who says Elton John is only a manufacturing facility for Disney soundtrack pablum should take a moment to listen to this LP. 

 
I get what you're saying, and I agree.  But it's a measure of how far the man, the artist, fell, from those tremendous days to the later, inspired, character he became. 

I'm not being overly critical; the entire arch of his career has been a good one.  The stuff from which dreams are made.  But I guess from my point of view the brilliance of his early years was never exceeded.  It's like his beginnings amounted to a supernova explosion of creativity, and everything else that rippled out from that initial explosion were just ripples, albeit still impressive one.  It was when he began to flaunt himself that he lost me.  I moved on to other styles of music. 

I suppose it's the problem experienced by most who attain their desires?.  Live the dream once, then chase it forever?

So it goes.

Highlow
American Net'Zen
This album goes a long way towards perfection: good melodies, excellent lyrics, nice variety of song styles, and an amazing group of talented musicians like drummer Nigel Olsson.

Anyone who says Elton John is only a manufacturing facility for Disney soundtrack pablum should take a moment to listen to this LP. 
Saw him in concert a few weeks ago. Amazing to have a whole arena of people singing along since we all know the words.
This is why I love Radio Paradise....they throw out gems like this...
 rushed wrote:
Mandolins make everything better.

 
Pete B. doesn't seem to think so.


 rushed wrote:
Mandolins make everything better.

 

The mandolin seals it for me.
 bm.deavenport613 wrote:
Definitely his best stuff was in the early 70's.

 
Sure was. We could some more of that early stuff right here. Take Me to the Pilot and Teacher I Need You, among others, were great and very memorable pop ditties. 
thank god i was on this planet for whatever span of time it will be; just to hear this

the photo on Honky Chateau was taken backstage at the Troubadour in LA, circa 1970
Definitely his best stuff was in the early 70's.
9>10
Mandolins make everything better.
{#Hearteyes}


He was quite prolific in the 1970s. 
Elton could do no wrong back then, especially when he partnered with Bernie Taupin
Yep. This is my favorite Elton John song.
 Steely_D wrote:
I so miss this Elton John.

 
HOW 'BOUT THIS ELTON JOHN?

Rocket man: Pop giant Elton John was missed out on chart success in 1972 thanks to T Rex's Metal Guru

I so miss this Elton John.
 ScottN wrote:
For some reason I connect this song to the movie by Terry Gilliam, The Fisher King.
btw, Robin Williams was beginning to fully express his acting chops.  Also stars Jeff Bridges, Amanda Plummer and more.
 
Jeff Bridges was great, as he usually is.
Great, classic tune, for sure. EJ could do no wrong during this period.
For some reason I connect this song to the movie by Terry Gilliam, The Fisher King.
btw, Robin Williams was beginning to fully express his acting chops.  Also stars Jeff Bridges, Amanda Plummer and more.
 KaraokeVox wrote:
it works so much better when singer songwriters can play piano instead of guitar.

lionel richie
billy joel 
 
Is this sarcasm?  {#Ask}
From the Way Back Machine, and one of the best albums .... well, since albums were invented.
This would be a marvelous Occupy Wall Street theme song...  everybody in my homeless camp loves this song...
it works so much better when singer songwriters can play piano instead of guitar.

lionel richie
billy joel 
I thank the lord ( mother nature ) for the people I have found............and my left foot caresses my Kilpsch speaker as this plays on RP. {#Cool}
{#Clap}  {#Clap} {#Clap}
Love this song.  Thanks for playing, Bill.  
THIS is Elton John......
When I hear this song  I will always think of  Almost Famous!

Great movie and song!
 Highlowsel wrote:

4merdj:  Indeed.  Say what you will about Elton John, and my own tendency is to like his early stuff over the later, the man has led an interesting life.  He has taken that gift (of life) and made it shine as best he can.  Would that more people be able to claim this, eh?

Highlow
American Net'Zen

 

Can you say understatement of all times?!!{#Lol}

It seems so apropos...


 laozilover wrote:
The first lebbenty-jillion times I heard this song, it was Buckshot LeFonque's rendition!  I should fo shizzle upload it!

Buckshot Lefonque on Amazon
 
Bump because I think this is funny.
 4merdj wrote:
Wow! That is Elton John V1.0 ... what an interesting career (and prolific, some might say) he has had! Well done, sir! {#Cheers}

 
4merdj:  Indeed.  Say what you will about Elton John, and my own tendency is to like his early stuff over the later, the man has led an interesting life.  He has taken that gift (of life) and made it shine as best he can.  Would that more people be able to claim this, eh?

Highlow
American Net'Zen
Wow! That is Elton John V1.0 ... what an interesting career (and prolific, some might say) he has had! Well done, sir! {#Cheers}
This song makes me stop what I'm doing, and just listen. it's like a little gift of time.
Elton in classic mode. His songs rang with priceless sincerity. There was no one better in these years, long before he became caricature of himself, and FM radio annihilated his artistry with endless repetitions of the execrable Bennie and the Jets. 
 jhorton wrote:


Or maybe he was just out of his mind on booze and coke for roughly two decades.....
 
Maybe he was out of his mind on booze and coke when he made the music that everyone loves from the 70's. 

He was so good then...


I love the mandolin in this.
Oh yes, Elton and Bernie at their best.
Back to me youth we go. still in high school..elton was ruling the airwaves, parting ways or not using Mr Taupin anymore...mistake imho.
 h8rhater wrote:

Maybe Elton just followed the money in the 80's, lost his credibility, and couldn't get back to where he was (like Phil Collins and Rod Stewart).  Maybe he lost his grounding in Taupin's absence (the album that he collaborated with Taupin on in '07, The Captain and the Kid, is actually quite good and harkens back to those early albums).  Maybe old people just can't make good music because they are not young, enthusiastic, and optimistic (a patently absurd position). 

Maybe Elton followed his own desires, created the music he wanted to, and it just didn't appeal to others as much as the older material.  Just because an artist isn't ringing-your-bell anymore, doesn't mean he isn't following his own.
 

Or maybe he was just out of his mind on booze and coke for roughly two decades.....
 mread wrote:

(Sorry, have to weigh in, too...)  With Elton John, the "change" seemed inevitable.  His stuff was so good and unique and he was so successful that it was too good to be true.... couldn't last forever.  lmic expressed that idea well.  With REM, their evolution seemed more deliberate than inevitable.  Hence the muddle.

What about Joni Mitchell?  Early stuff super good, later stuff has no appeal to me, yet she was such a creative genius and innovator that there was no way she would keep to her early form.  So, one is stuck between anger and resignation.
 
Maybe Elton just followed the money in the 80's, lost his credibility, and couldn't get back to where he was (like Phil Collins and Rod Stewart).  Maybe he lost his grounding in Taupin's absence (the album that he collaborated with Taupin on in '07, The Captain and the Kid, is actually quite good and harkens back to those early albums).  Maybe old people just can't make good music because they are not young, enthusiastic, and optimistic (a patently absurd position). 

Maybe Elton followed his own desires, created the music he wanted to, and it just didn't appeal to others as much as the older material.  Just because an artist isn't ringing-your-bell anymore, doesn't mean he isn't following his own.
One of the best NYC tributes out there. Also love the Indigos cover.
 Rooney wrote:
But the same could hold true for many artists.  Really great early stuff, sucky later stuff.  Elvis comes to mind, Elton John is fabulous from 1970-75.  That's when it ended for me.  The only ones who held up until the very end, imo, were the Beatles.  I'm not an REM fan so I can't comment on them. 
 
The Anti-Beatles? Started off, bubble gum and poppy, then Strawberry Fields, and then Abbey Road, which is one of the best albums. Ever.
Always reminded me of saving my pennies until I could buy "Honky Chateau" for $5.29 at the age of 13.  Until that scene in "Almost Famous".  Now I think of that when I hear this song.
I remember driving a uhaul on the upper east side with my fiancée and best friend and this song came on - we were all moving into the city. It was one of those clear, fall days in nyc, I had the windows down and shoddy stereo blasted. It was one of the best moments of my life.
 tphord wrote:
On the subject of how and why do artists music evolve over the years... in many peoples view, often for the worse.

My thought is that it is very tied to their evolution and growth as individual people affected and changed over time by their life experiences.

I think the early music is inspired by the dreams, hope and optimism of youth... the change (or cessation) of an artists music later in life a direct result of the cynicism or perhaps perspective that comes as we mature, and changes those early emotions significantly.

Just a thought... {#Angel}
 
. . . and boatloads of cocaine.


On the subject of how and why do artists music evolve over the years... in many peoples view, often for the worse.

My thought is that it is very tied to their evolution and growth as individual people affected and changed over time by their life experiences.

I think the early music is inspired by the dreams, hope and optimism of youth... the change (or cessation) of an artists music later in life a direct result of the cynicism or perhaps perspective that comes as we mature, and changes those early emotions significantly.

Just a thought... {#Angel}
"And I thank the Lord for the people I have found"...truly I do...
 mread wrote:

(Sorry, have to weigh in, too...)  With Elton John, the "change" seemed inevitable.  His stuff was so good and unique and he was so successful that it was too good to be true.... couldn't last forever.  lmic expressed that idea well.  With REM, their evolution seemed more deliberate than inevitable.  Hence the muddle.

What about Joni Mitchell?  Early stuff super good, later stuff has no appeal to me, yet she was such a creative genius and innovator that there was no way she would keep to her early form.  So, one is stuck between anger and resignation.
 
Can't help but wonder if the record companies didn't finally have their way with them .............just saying...........
 Hannio wrote:


Just out of curiosity, how is "whinge" pronounced?  Similar to "singe" or "hinge", or like "whine"?
 
Yes, pronounced as in singe and hinge. Winj. Meaning as in whine.
 lmic wrote:
I just noticed something funny. People who love early Elton but not his later work (like me) express their disappointment as sadness, remaining resignedly loyal to the early stuff. But people who love early R.E.M. and not their later work (again, me), tend more toward anger or at least outrage, and seem to be kind of pissed off at the band, as if we were duped by the first 5 albums or something.
Hmmm.
 
(Sorry, have to weigh in, too...)  With Elton John, the "change" seemed inevitable.  His stuff was so good and unique and he was so successful that it was too good to be true.... couldn't last forever.  lmic expressed that idea well.  With REM, their evolution seemed more deliberate than inevitable.  Hence the muddle.

What about Joni Mitchell?  Early stuff super good, later stuff has no appeal to me, yet she was such a creative genius and innovator that there was no way she would keep to her early form.  So, one is stuck between anger and resignation.


 Randomax wrote:
Ah yes....the old stuff..........but doesn't the change have a lot to do with splitting w/Bernie Taupin?  Were they still together for this album?  I would bet they were....IMHO it all fell apart after that...once EJ had to write (or co-write) and be the melody man it just turned to commercial crap (altho it wasn't ALL crap - but def. different!)
 
Elton was always the melody man.  Taupin did the lyrics and not much else.  The "commercialization" began before they split — started showing up on Yellow Brick Road, as far as I'm concerned.


I thank the lord for the people I have found. {#Yes}
 Toke wrote:
shattup !!! oooooooooooooooo my ears .. whinge whinge whinge !!!
 

Just out of curiosity, how is "whinge" pronounced?  Similar to "singe" or "hinge", or like "whine"?

 sirdroseph wrote:


I don't see that, I have no anger towards REM or Elton, just think that pretty much everything Elton did after around 1977 and REM after 1992 or so pretty much sucks ass and it is really strange and ironic.
 
They used to make good music, but now they make bad music. If that's not the definition of irony then I don't know what is!

But the same could hold true for many artists.  Really great early stuff, sucky later stuff.  Elvis comes to mind, Elton John is fabulous from 1970-75.  That's when it ended for me.  The only ones who held up until the very end, imo, were the Beatles.  I'm not an REM fan so I can't comment on them. 
 lmic wrote:
I just noticed something funny. People who love early Elton but not his later work (like me) express their disappointment as sadness, remaining resignedly loyal to the early stuff. But people who love early R.E.M. and not their later work (again, me), tend more toward anger or at least outrage, and seem to be kind of pissed off at the band, as if we were duped by the first 5 albums or something.
Hmmm.
 

I don't see that, I have no anger towards REM or Elton, just think that pretty much everything Elton did after around 1977 and REM after 1992 or so pretty much sucks ass and it is really strange and ironic. I wish them both well and thank them for the wonderful music they put out in the early periods of their respective careers. I just wish that both of them would stop recording is all (Stones too).
 xkolibuul wrote:
I first learned this tune on vinyl years ago, and never heard it again until RP.  That record had a big skip in the middle of the first refrain—the kind where you'd have to bump the turntable to get the needle progressing again—and its weird to hear the song without it.  

 

I had a Janis Joplin album like that, every time I hear the song I stumble when it doesn't skip
     now forever imprinted on my mind
chappin broccolichappin broccoli
chappin broccolichappin broccoli
Ah yes....the old stuff..........but doesn't the change have a lot to do with splitting w/Bernie Taupin?  Were they still together for this album?  I would bet they were....IMHO it all fell apart after that...once EJ had to write (or co-write) and be the melody man it just turned to commercial crap (altho it wasn't ALL crap - but def. different!)
this song is great, 1972 huh linzie wrote:


yeah, me too
 


 lmic wrote:
I just noticed something funny. People who love early Elton but not his later work (like me) express their disappointment as sadness, remaining resignedly loyal to the early stuff. But people who love early R.E.M. and not their later work (again, me), tend more toward anger or at least outrage, and seem to be kind of pissed off at the band, as if we were duped by the first 5 albums or something.
Hmmm.
 
Interesting, and I think you're generally right! Perhaps the Elton fans think he just changed as an artist, whereas the REM fans felt they sold out. I'm guessing, 'cause I like both old and new REM—for different reasons.
 michaelgmitchell wrote:
 rbigelo wrote:
Singing along and about to cry ...
Gets me every time, too. Don't know why, just does. Maybe taking me back to my youth.


 

yeah, me too
The first lebbenty-jillion times I heard this song, it was Buckshot LeFonque's rendition!  I should fo shizzle upload it!

Buckshot Lefonque on Amazon


 rbigelo wrote:
Singing along and about to cry ...
Gets me every time, too. Don't know why, just does. Maybe taking me back to my youth.


I just noticed something funny. People who love early Elton but not his later work (like me) express their disappointment as sadness, remaining resignedly loyal to the early stuff. But people who love early R.E.M. and not their later work (again, me), tend more toward anger or at least outrage, and seem to be kind of pissed off at the band, as if we were duped by the first 5 albums or something.
Hmmm.
 Toke wrote:
shattup !!! oooooooooooooooo my ears .. whinge whinge whinge !!!
 

I guess you didn't grow up in the 70's.  This was pretty great stuff back then, and I'm pretty sure I got laid the first time listening to EJ!  LOL!
Grreeeattt Tune, one of many. 

Someone said:There are some musical artists who start good and end badly, and ending badly continue to sing (unfortunately for us all). One of these is Willie Nelson. His very first album was true art (back before he grew a ponytail and started dressing in rags and pretending to be a neuvo-country star. Elton John is another. His first albums were tremendous but the longer he sings and the more outrageous and "out o' the closet" he gets, the worse and more trite his music becomes. This early song in his career is a balladeer's dream, flowing from emotion to emotion. Every time I hear it it takes me back to people I used to know, some of whom I miss (and some of whom I do not).

If you want to talk about bands that had an awesome start... I suggest the Roling Stones.  Very few of their albums from the 70's onward can compare to the quality of the earliest ones.
 Shesdifferent wrote:

That's too bad because this is one of the best Elton songs! I'd rather hear Elton that Billy Joel anyday. Still, both very talented, aren't they doing a show together?
 

yup, i think they are doing at least a handful of dates together this year, or already have?...not sure. 

elton at his best, i love it.  the mandolin in the chorus and throughout is just sublime!
Singing along and about to cry ...
 dboseman wrote:
I miss the Elton John of the 70's.  He had an incredible talent and accompanied me through my adolescence.
 
He still puts on a great live show. Last year he played a solo show in Halifax, nearly 3 hours at the piano playing one great song after another. It was terrific.
shattup !!! oooooooooooooooo my ears .. whinge whinge whinge !!!

What a great song. It inspires me.{#Daisy}


 EssexTex wrote:
Even bad Billy Joel's better than Elton...I may be wrong but Billy writes his words AND music...ok so he can't drive a car in a straight line but...he's the "Piano Man"
 
That's too bad because this is one of the best Elton songs! I'd rather hear Elton that Billy Joel anyday. Still, both very talented, aren't they doing a show together?
 TheLib wrote:
This is my favorite song from a really good album (yes, I had it on vinyl :-). It's a shame that he hasn't done much worthwhile since Yellow Brick Road. Even so, the catalog of his work to that point is still an amazing achievement. The fact that most of his work since the early 70s makes me want to gag doesn't take anything away from his really good stuff.

 
{#High-five} Right On! Honky Chateau is my favorite Elton John album.
Like the early Elton better than the later one.  He started to lose me after Yellow Brick Road.

I like Billy Joel, too, especially the Piano Man CD.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Oh yah! I'd much rather hear "Uptown Girl" than "Where to now St. Peter?" any day. . . . (not)

 
They are even better together. Saw them years ago at the horseshoe in Columbus, OH. Complete awesomeness.

 EssexTex wrote:
Even bad Billy Joel's better than Elton...
 
Oh yah! I'd much rather hear "Uptown Girl" than "Where to now St. Peter?" any day. . . . (not)

 lwilkinson wrote:
There are some musical artists who start good and end badly, and ending badly continue to sing (unfortunately for us all). One of these is Willie Nelson. His very first album was true art (back before he grew a ponytail and started dressing in rags and pretending to be a neuvo-country star. Elton John is another. His first albums were tremendous but the longer he sings and the more outrageous and "out o' the closet" he gets, the worse and more trite his music becomes. This early song in his career is a balladeer's dream, flowing from emotion to emotion. Every time I hear it it takes me back to people I used to know, some of whom I miss (and some of whom I do not).
 
"Neuvo-country star"?  "Out o' the closet"?  Ever heard of an artist really finding themselves?  Could be they continue to grow while we stop.  Change is not a bad thing.

I know what you mean.  The skip is etched permanently in the brain.  It's like- hey, it's supposed to skip there.  I have a couple of those lp's.  
But if you had this record, I know you are an old m'er f'er

 
xkolibuul wrote:
I first learned this tune on vinyl years ago, and never heard it again until RP.  That record had a big skip in the middle of the first refrain—the kind where you'd have to bump the turntable to get the needle progressing again—and its weird to hear the song without it.  

 


I first learned this tune on vinyl years ago, and never heard it again until RP.  That record had a big skip in the middle of the first refrain—the kind where you'd have to bump the turntable to get the needle progressing again—and its weird to hear the song without it.  

He sounds just like Zachary Richard.  I thought it was until I checked.

we all change and grow, and in some cases diminish, EJ had so much going he just could'nt maintain, but even now going to see him makes me SMILE, thank God for VEGAS, baby!!!! {#Dance}
 dboseman wrote:
I miss the Elton John of the 70's.  He had an incredible talent and accompanied me through my adolescence.
 
I sure don't miss this. Way too MOR (doesn't even qualify for AOR) and I sure heard FAR too much of EJ back then.


It's easy to overplay Elton John, but I really like hearing him when you do play his stuff...particularly the longer ballads.
A great song from a strong LP. I still revisit the old John/Taupin albums. Later stuff got quite weak, but the latest Captain and the Kid had some good tracks.
 TheLib wrote:
This is my favorite song from a really good album (yes, I had it on vinyl :-).

It's a shame that he hasn't done much worthwhile since Yellow Brick Road. Even so, the catalog of his work to that point is still an amazing achievement.

The fact that most of his work since the early 70s makes me want to gag doesn't take anything away from his really good stuff.

 
I agree 100% with everything you said.  I listened to these early albums endlessly.

Nancy Wilson does a nice version of this on Heart's live in Seattle DVD around '03. Annie can still WAIL too btw...barefoot and surrounded by candles no less. Studio quality show.
 TheLib wrote:
This is my favorite song from a really good album (yes, I had it on vinyl :-).

It's a shame that he hasn't done much worthwhile since Yellow Brick Road. Even so, the catalog of his work to that point is still an amazing achievement.

The fact that most of his work since the early 70s makes me want to gag doesn't take anything away from his really good stuff.

 
Agree 100% completely, etc.  Would be fine if you play more of his good stuff, Bill.  We won't object.  (Well, most of us anyway!)

That being said, the line "the subway is no way for a good man to go down" has taken on a whole new meaning than what we attributed to it back in the day!   (Sorry, couldn't resist that one!)


I miss the Elton John of the 70's.  He had an incredible talent and accompanied me through my adolescence.

Wow! Just, WOW! Whatever happened to him after 1972, I'll never know.

Excellent song about the dark side of the world's greatest city.
This is my favorite song from a really good album (yes, I had it on vinyl :-). It's a shame that he hasn't done much worthwhile since Yellow Brick Road. Even so, the catalog of his work to that point is still an amazing achievement. The fact that most of his work since the early 70s makes me want to gag doesn't take anything away from his really good stuff.
Ennis wrote:
I'm in a minority here - I really don't like this song. For one thing, it's a fairly trite ballad, and EJ is capable of far better. For another ... it's just a bit too easy listening for me. I'm not presuming to tell Bill and Rebecca how to program, I'm just voicing an opinion about this song ... feh. It's like bad Billy Joel ...
I'll back you up Ennis....SO many words that mean...absolutely nothing (to me). Where's the efficiency? I guess I'm not the target audience.
EssexTex wrote:
Even bad Billy Joel's better than Elton...I may be wrong but Billy writes his words AND music...ok so he can't drive a car in a straight line but...he's the "Piano Man"
What!!?!?!? Surely you must have meant the reverse...?
Ahh, Elton John. He smells like finely aged seashore cheddar.
This is very nice. Rufus Wainwright does a great cover too.
Even bad Billy Joel's better than Elton...I may be wrong but Billy writes his words AND music...ok so he can't drive a car in a straight line but...he's the "Piano Man"
Ennis wrote:
I'm in a minority here - I really don't like this song. For one thing, it's a fairly trite ballad, and EJ is capable of far better. For another ... it's just a bit too easy listening for me. I'm not presuming to tell Bill and Rebecca how to program, I'm just voicing an opinion about this song ... feh. It's like bad Billy Joel ...
There are some musical artists who start good and end badly, and ending badly continue to sing (unfortunately for us all). One of these is Willie Nelson. His very first album was true art (back before he grew a ponytail and started dressing in rags and pretending to be a neuvo-country star. Elton John is another. His first albums were tremendous but the longer he sings and the more outrageous and "out o' the closet" he gets, the worse and more trite his music becomes. This early song in his career is a balladeer's dream, flowing from emotion to emotion. Every time I hear it it takes me back to people I used to know, some of whom I miss (and some of whom I do not). :clap:
I listen to this album a couple times a month. Never fails me. c.
blinkblink wrote:
From the days when Elton had cred. I think all his recent music has been written by a computer.
If that's true, he needs better programmers. But this was nice.
those early John/Taupin albums were wonderful. And the orchestration by (I think) Paul Buckmaster was never over the top and alwasys fit.
One of Elton's finest moments, for sure.
Ennis wrote:
It's like bad Billy Joel ...
There's good Billy Joel? ">
:stop: please
I'm in a minority here - I really don't like this song. For one thing, it's a fairly trite ballad, and EJ is capable of far better. For another ... it's just a bit too easy listening for me. I'm not presuming to tell Bill and Rebecca how to program, I'm just voicing an opinion about this song ... feh. It's like bad Billy Joel ...
wow! haven't heard this in so many years....!!! thank you!
mxdcec wrote:
December 31, 2005 It's +12 hrs LA Time here in the Middle East. I was contemplating past New Years Eves in New York City, when I was living in Manhattan. As the song began to play I saw my first rain in 11 months. Tears from heaven I was told as a child. Mine today, I sacrastically sneer. Ininvited memories rush in, bringing with them the lingering question, where did you all go? Why can't we still all somehow be together? Will any of you be remembering me tonight, or am I as forgotten as I fear? Happy New Year Mark X. Davis United Arab Emirates
Hey! I'll remember you!!!!
December 31, 2005 It's +12 hrs LA Time here in the Middle East. I was contemplating past New Years Eves in New York City, when I was living in Manhattan. As the song began to play I saw my first rain in 11 months. Tears from heaven I was told as a child. Mine today, I sacrastically sneer. Ininvited memories rush in, bringing with them the lingering question, where did you all go? Why can't we still all somehow be together? Will any of you be remembering me tonight, or am I as forgotten as I fear? Happy New Year Mark X. Davis United Arab Emirates
Very nice. I miss this from him. :yes:
As long as its early EJ, keep it coming, Bill! Fantastic, atmospheric song.
One of the greatest lyrics I've ever heard: "Subway's no way for a good man to go down"