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Simon & Garfunkel — I Am A Rock
Album: The Sounds of Silence
Avg rating:
8.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2043









Released: 1966
Length: 2:48
Plays (last 30 days): 1
A winter's day
In a deep and dark December;
I am alone,
Gazing from my window to the streets below
On a freshly fallen silent shroud of snow.
I am a rock,
I am an island.

I've built walls,
A fortress deep and mighty,
That none may penetrate.
I have no need of friendship; friendship causes pain.
It's laughter and it's loving I disdain.
I am a rock,
I am an island.

Don't talk of love,
But I've heard the words before;
It's sleeping in my memory.
I won't disturb the slumber of feelings that have died.
If I never loved I never would have cried.
I am a rock,
I am an island.

I have my books
And my poetry to protect me;
I am shielded in my armor,
Hiding in my room, safe within my womb.
I touch no one and no one touches me.
I am a rock,
I am an island.

And a rock feels no pain;
And an island never cries.
Comments (218)add comment
When I was young, I laughed about this duet, their sweet song and their ridiculous way of dancing, Garfunkel in Central Park, it was worth it, compared to The Clash, or the punk band I loved at that time... And now, their song seems so deep and universal, I'm no longer a rock, nor an island, I lived! And I can forgive everyone, even your way of dancing, Art ...
Long Live                                                                                                                          Radio Paradise
Rating from me is a solid                                                                                    8 - Most Excellent   
 Bultaco wrote:
All I can say about "I Am a Rock", is, "Good song...but, with all the music in the world, the (seemingly disproportionate) frequency with which I hear Paul or Paul and Art, makes me think RP is playing to the regulations of some unspoken 'minimum American content' guideline."

Yes, they are/were good, but...maybe we could explore Stevie Ray's or Steve Vai's or, or, or.......a few thousand others' catalogs. Heck, the Beatles!

I for one would be happy to hear a little MORE eclecticism.
 
I did hear some Stevie Ray here earlier today -- Texas Flood.

I think eclectic is where you hear an old classic like this mixed with newer and older songs, regardless of whether they would have been on the same bill style-wise. Show me a station that would do that and throw in the occasional classical or reggae song.  Big Band and old blues songs, too?  You'll not find any station with a more eclectic playlist that this.
 Bultaco wrote:

Who's "her"?

All I can say about "I Am a Rock", is, "Good song...but, with all the music in the world, the (seemingly disproportionate) frequency with which I hear Paul or Paul and Art, makes me think RP is playing to the regulations of some unspoken 'minimum American content' guideline."

Yes, they are/were good, but...maybe we could explore Stevie Ray's or Steve Vai's or, or, or.......a few thousand others' catalogs. Heck, the Beatles!

I for one would be happy to hear a little MORE eclecticism. 

That's my Sunday rant.........thank you!
 
"Her" is the dearly departed RPster, Cynaera (Ann) who you'll find was a very well admired poster here, with a lot bumps to keep her comments 'up near the top.'

As for the frequency with which BillG plays certain artists, I'm SURE that BillG has ZERO regulations about who he plays more than another.  I will add that, while I like a lot of the old S&G tunes (I have this one at a 9) I do find that what BillG does segue-wise with these classics is, well, classic; take for example today's pairing w/ Radiohead's "Karma Police." Great sonic combo....Long Live RP!!
 jambo wrote:

with all due respect, then i would recommend iTunes or maybe Tidal. if you think you can do better than bill, good for you. i think that's the gist here. 
 
Yah, what he said. Long live RP!  Eclecticism at its finest.  With respect!
 
 Bultaco wrote:

Who's "her"?

All I can say about "I Am a Rock", is, "Good song...but, with all the music in the world, the (seemingly disproportionate) frequency with which I hear Paul or Paul and Art, makes me think RP is playing to the regulations of some unspoken 'minimum American content' guideline."

Yes, they are/were good, but...maybe we could explore Stevie Ray's or Steve Vai's or, or, or.......a few thousand others' catalogs. Heck, the Beatles!

I for one would be happy to hear a little MORE eclecticism. 

That's my Sunday rant.........thank you!
 
with all due respect, then i would recommend iTunes or maybe Tidal. if you think you can do better than bill, good for you. i think that's the gist here. 
Decided to listen to the radio rather than dive into the sociopolitical petri dish of the news.

So glad I did.
 Lazarus wrote: 
Who's "her"?

All I can say about "I Am a Rock", is, "Good song...but, with all the music in the world, the (seemingly disproportionate) frequency with which I hear Paul or Paul and Art, makes me think RP is playing to the regulations of some unspoken 'minimum American content' guideline."

Yes, they are/were good, but...maybe we could explore Stevie Ray's or Steve Vai's or, or, or.......a few thousand others' catalogs. Heck, the Beatles!

I for one would be happy to hear a little MORE eclecticism. 

That's my Sunday rant.........thank you!
 Cynaera wrote:
Back in about 1967 or 1968, I was living in Carson City, Nevada. My parents had a stereo/TV sales and repair business.  People would drop off record players, sometimes with the records still in them. I got "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones (my FIRST listen) and "I Am A Rock."  I kept the records, and no one ever mentioned the loss when they claimed their record-players.  I was too young to know then that what came in was what should go out.  (Silly me.) 

That was also the first time I'd ever heard Simon and Garfunkel. It took some time, but I finally understood "deep."  I listened to this 45 countless times, and I think it was part of what led me to appreciate so many types of music. 

I only wish Mom and Dad were still alive - I'd love to ask them about that time in our lives...


hayduke2 wrote:
Godlike music, Beauty shared
 

Well said, hayduke2... we all miss her so much... I love this song, and this magnificent album...


Had I been alive in the 60s, I'm sure this album would have been therapy for some of the devastating shit that went down (wars (well, always war) assassinations, civil unrest, etc.) - and huh....listening to it just short of 2020 it's still THERAPY.  So thanks to S&G for helping us out, and to B&R for playing it here.  Long Live RP!!  And PEACE damn it!
there are some songs that at the first note you turn up the volume . for me this one of them. Art garfunk adds nice vocals but Paul Simon is an American gem and a world treasure.so turn it up,sing along loud and proud and give thanks to be alive at a time when such wonder filled music came into being. Thanks RP for keeping it alive
 rdo wrote:


Dostoevsky and Gogol had similar critiques of the radicals of their time.  This was a major theme for them.  Few realize these were both quite reactionary writers.  Notes from the Underground is a classic example. Are you saying Simon and Garfunkel were reactionaries?  This makes a little more sense now. 

 
Reactionaries?  You mean like Bob Dylan?  (Another great critic of the counter-culture.)

 On_The_Beach wrote:

The Sound of Silence?
Right artist, wrong song; go figger.

 
Right album though.
 Tomasni wrote:
I came here with PSD  BUT I get only SILENCE
 
The Sound of Silence?
Right artist, wrong song; go figger.
I'm not normally into 60s music that much, but S&G are simply amazing.
Paul Simon is one of the best songwriters ever in my opinion, this is one of the many outstanding ...
 Cynaera wrote:
Back in about 1967 or 1968, I was living in Carson City, Nevada. My parents had a stereo/TV sales and repair business.  People would drop off record players, sometimes with the records still in them. I got "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones (my FIRST listen) and "I Am A Rock."  I kept the records, and no one ever mentioned the loss when they claimed their record-players.  I was too young to know then that what came in was what should go out.  (Silly me.)

That was also the first time I'd ever heard Simon and Garfunkel. It took some time, but I finally understood "deep."  I listened to this 45 countless times, and I think it was part of what led me to appreciate so many types of music.

I only wish Mom and Dad were still alive - I'd love to ask them about that time in our lives...

 
Godlike music, Beauty shared
{#Music}
{#Beat}  {#Fever}
 jmsmy wrote:
Very DARK for 60's rock

 
idunno, plenty of darkness back then. Check out Mr Pharmacist, Primitive, Paint it Black and then give me a call. 
When this came on just now, on Dec. 19, its first lines made me smile! Thanks.
Perfect song for today.
Thanks, Bill and Rebecca! 
  wondewr the bm.deavenport613 wrote:

You lived Pat, you lived.

 
I wonder the same thing Pat

 
 bm.deavenport613 wrote:

You lived Pat, you lived.

 
heard it on vinyl, am radio, FM, tapes, parents, streaming and it still draws me in.  
This is like poetry that stirs my memories from days gone by.  
Song has also lived, will live on.     

Drawn me in in unexpected ways.  Should be used to this RP effect, can't quite recall what I was doing yet drawn to what's  next.
Quite a set Bill!
 Old_Pat wrote:
sigh........    1966......... howthehell did I get this old........
 

 
You lived Pat, you lived.
sigh........    1966......... howthehell did I get this old........
 
  I'm a rock
Go own dearest
 CaffeineSam wrote:
Since when did rocks and islands start singing ?!

This is a fucked up world we live in...

 
I hope that your rhetorical question and statement reflect a snarky or misanthropic observation. If not, perhaps you've heard of widely used literary devices such as metaphors, similes and symbolism. 
Paul Simon used to write such great stuff.
In 7th grade music class, we tried to figure out how this worked with John Donne's "No Man Is An Island." 
We did not get far, but the experience set the tone for me for the rest of school - that ideas could be shared across the centuries, and that distant artists might engage in conversations.
It would be neat to pair this with Warren Zevon's "Splendid Isolation."
I think Al Kooper plays organ on this track. As he did superbly on so many other great songs. 
Stunning, truly stunning.  When Godlike is the only option.
 Chi_Editrix wrote:
You know, there isn't enough money in the world you could pay me to be 16 again.

 
Amen
 kingart wrote:
It's not December, it's January. But the lyric lines applies. 

Gazing from my window to the streets below
On a freshly fallen silent shroud of snow.

Blizzard.
Beer.
RP.
 

 
Got snowed in at Pat's Bar & Grill on Nostrard Ave by Kings Highway on a winters night years ago, we had lots of beer and just a jukebox, no RP at that time.
...my morning shines so brightly  {#Crown}
Since when did rocks and islands start singing ?!

This is a fucked up world we live in...
 Chi_Editrix wrote:
You know, there isn't enough money in the world you could pay me to be 16 again.

 
Oh, I dunno, if I could spend an hour or two with the woman I was dating when I was 16 . . . 
You know, there isn't enough money in the world you could pay me to be 16 again.
 kingart wrote:
It's not December, it's January. But the lyric lines applies. 

Gazing from my window to the streets below
On a freshly fallen silent shroud of snow.

Blizzard.
Beer.
RP.
 

 
{#Clap}
It's not December, it's January. But the lyric lines applies. 

Gazing from my window to the streets below
On a freshly fallen silent shroud of snow.

Blizzard.
Beer.
RP.
 
On a deep and dark December day. 
{#Dance}.... as good as it gets 10
CLASSIC!
"If I never loved I never would have cried" - no truer words were spoken!

The first concert I ever saw, 10 years old!


 jmsmy wrote:
Very DARK for 60's rock

 
Hardly
 unclehud wrote:
 
Yeah, it's about social isolation and a teenager's desire to fit in without sacrificing the pieces that define yourself.

"I am an island" (isolated) and "I am a rock" (all you people can fork off).  This is why I held this song tight to my heart, as did a lot of the world back then.  I am no longer an island -- well, most of the time anyway -- but absolutely remain a rock. 

"My books and my poetry" are his armor.  As an adult, fiber optic cables, wireless networks, and project management tools are mine when needed.
  
Sorry you don't like the lyrics.  Are you an island?   What protects you?

  

No, I am not an island.  I love literature.  I derive great pleasure from it. I am a rational egoist in that regard.  Being around people bores me more and more, the older I get.  I am just not all that interested in what people have to say in person.  I am quite interested in what people write.  I am quite put off by the lyrics of this song because I don't like the association between literature and the island/rock.  That's fine, I guess, if one really cannot be around people, but I want literature to be much more culturally relevant than it is.  I want it to be quite normal and accepted to run off and read a serious book or poem, and then talk about it with others.  It should not be such a stigmatized activity.  This songs seems to harden those attitudes.


So...I went and read all the comments here.  There are many good comments here in support of the lyrics, which I applaud.  However, there was one commenter who seems to lend some support to my argument from none other than Paul Simon himself.  The following is culled from the Wikipedia entry for this song:

Until 1981, the initial official recording of "I Am a Rock" on The Paul Simon Song Book remained unavailable in North America. This was partly because Simon himself disdained the album, saying on the album's liner notes,

This L.P. contains twelve of the songs that I have written over the past two years. There are some here that I would not write today. I don't believe in them as I once did. I have included them because they played an important role in the transition. It is discomforting, almost painful, to look back over something someone else created and realize that someone else was you. I am not ashamed of where I've been and what I've thought. It's just not me anymore. It is perfectly clear to me that the songs I write today will not be mine tomorrow. I don't regret the loss.


  
 unclehud wrote:
 
Yeah, it's about social isolation and a teenager's desire to fit in without sacrificing the pieces that define yourself.

"I am an island" (isolated) and "I am a rock" (all you people can fork off).  This is why I held this song tight to my heart, as did a lot of the world back then.  I am no longer an island -- well, most of the time anyway -- but absolutely remain a rock. 

"My books and my poetry" are his armor.  As an adult, fiber optic cables, wireless networks, and project management tools are mine when needed.
  
Sorry you don't like the lyrics.  Are you an island?   What protects you?

 
I like what I like. I know many don't like these things, that's fair, but I like what I like and you can't dislike that I like them. Well, you can, but that's just life. That's what they are saying. You can't hurt me, because I'm strong in the things I know. 

Or maybe they're just saying we're all just fooling ourselves that things we like make us strong....and it's just bollox.

/cc NSA, GCHQ 
 rdo wrote:
I listen to the lyrics of this song, and I don't like them.  My impression of the song is that it calls into question the joys of social isolation.  I think the social stigma of isolation is the problem.  It's that Invasion of the Body Snatchers look you get when you tell people you read poetry.   I like this song, but I definitely do not like its message.  Maybe I am hearing it wrong.  I'd be interested to hear other impressions...
 
But please, don't go reading into this statement some sort of observation about "status" or a cultural commentary about my own "class" or nationality or whatever perverse little notions you have in your mind.  This is a global observation of every human being.  
  
Yeah, it's about social isolation and a teenager's desire to fit in without sacrificing the pieces that define yourself.

"I am an island" (isolated) and "I am a rock" (all you people can fork off).  This is why I held this song tight to my heart, as did a lot of the world back then.  I am no longer an island -- well, most of the time anyway -- but absolutely remain a rock. 

"My books and my poetry" are his armor.  As an adult, fiber optic cables, wireless networks, and project management tools are mine when needed.
  
Sorry you don't like the lyrics.  Are you an island?   What protects you?
 westslope wrote:

The science is simple.  If former member likes it; I like it.  Case closed.

This is a critique of some elements of the counter-culture.  



 

Dostoevsky and Gogol had similar critiques of the radicals of their time.  This was a major theme for them.  Few realize these were both quite reactionary writers.  Notes from the Underground is a classic example. Are you saying Simon and Garfunkel were reactionaries?  This makes a little more sense now. 
Very DARK for 60's rock

 westslope wrote:

The science is simple.  If former member likes it; I like it.  Case closed.

This is a critique of some elements of the counter-culture.  

 

Thank you!  I be the holy ghost of big stud Romeo Tuma...  hope you are having a marvelous time...


love this song... 
where'd the boys dig up the lyrics for this one?  Sounds like something I would read on the wall of a Jr. High bathroom stall?
 (former member) wrote:

Everybody in my hotel room be dancing...  love it...


 
 

The science is simple.  If former member likes it; I like it.  Case closed.

This is a critique of some elements of the counter-culture.  


 Easyrider wrote:
Simply beautiful and fills me with happiness after all these years.
 
Me too. {#Sunny}
 MortimerS wrote:

Angst is universal as far as age is concerned. At least that is what I have observed. A burden is a burden is a burden to bear. That doesn't stop an old fhart from laughing in your pimply face or a youngster sneering at your old crickety legs or leathery countenance though. I first heard this when my mean sister bought it way way back when it was fresh and new. She isn't mean to me anymore though we are both getting old and crickety now, so maybe it was my angst that made her seem so.
 
I listen to the lyrics of this song, and I don't like them.  My impression of the song is that it calls into question the joys of social isolation.  I think the social stigma of isolation is the problem.  It's that Invasion of the Body Snatchers look you get when you tell people you read poetry.   I like this song, but I definitely do not like its message.  Maybe I am hearing it wrong.  I'd be interested to hear other impressions...
 
But please, don't go reading into this statement some sort of observation about "status" or a cultural commentary about my own "class" or nationality or whatever perverse little notions you have in your mind.  This is a global observation of every human being.  
Love the song since....
 skibbenr wrote:
I bought the album "Sounds of Silence" second hand from my cousin when he came to visit us in Chicago (probably to escape his folks in Ohio for a while).  This song in particular sure appealed to my teen-aged angst or (since teens probably can't actually feel angst?!) at least my sullen attitude toward life at 13-14.  I'm over it now.
 
Angst is universal as far as age is concerned. At least that is what I have observed. A burden is a burden is a burden to bear. That doesn't stop an old fhart from laughing in your pimply face or a youngster sneering at your old crickety legs or leathery countenance though. I first heard this when my mean sister bought it way way back when it was fresh and new. She isn't mean to me anymore though we are both getting old and crickety now, so maybe it was my angst that made her seem so.
I like the three Paul Simon's today...forgot how much I missed him.
 skibbenr wrote:
I bought the album "Sounds of Silence" second hand from my cousin when he came to visit us in Chicago (probably to escape his folks in Ohio for a while).  This song in particular sure appealed to my teen-aged angst or (since teens probably can't actually feel angst?!) at least my sullen attitude toward life at 13-14.  I'm over it now.
 

I remember being in a similar junior high funk and writing "I am a Rock, I am an Island" over and over and over on a piece of paper. 

Wouldn't have missed those times for anything, but there isn't enough money in the world to pay me to do it again.
the happiest sounding depressing song ever written.  9.
Simply beautiful and fills me with happiness after all these years.
 Stingray wrote:
WONDERFUL duo - great song!
LEAVE ALONE "Sounds of Silence" was their "Opus Magnum" (or vice versa, if you prefere)
"8"

 
When did they put out a song that was called "Opus Magnum"?
 Elroweho wrote:
"If I never Loved I never would have cried" - so true!
 
Yes.  Everything has a price, doesn't it?  Nothing is free.
"If I never Loved I never would have cried" - so true!
WONDERFUL duo - great song!
LEAVE ALONE "Sounds of Silence" was their "Opus Magnum" (or vice versa, if you prefere)
"8"

I think his best song, don't know what Art's influence was. Probably alone on this island.

Everybody in my hotel room be dancing...  love it...


 
I bought the album "Sounds of Silence" second hand from my cousin when he came to visit us in Chicago (probably to escape his folks in Ohio for a while).  This song in particular sure appealed to my teen-aged angst or (since teens probably can't actually feel angst?!) at least my sullen attitude toward life at 13-14.  I'm over it now.
 fingerpin wrote:
My anthem as an angst-riddled kid. {#Wink} {#Rolleyes}
I feel much better these days. {#Devil_pimp}
How YOU doin'? {#Wave}
 
Just fine. Angst under moderate control. Thanks for askin'


 Proclivities wrote:
 bachbeet wrote:
What is good about the song is that the writer (Simon) is not really in favor of the stance taken.  He's aware of the cynical bitter stance taken by the protagonist.  He knows it's not really something to be proud of to be like this:

I touch no one and no one touches me.
I am a rock,
I am an island.

And a rock feels no pain;
And an island never cries.

This is not a really healthy way to be.


It seems as if he's writing about a temporary response to an emotionally painful incident.  I don't find it to be as much "cynical" as it is self-preservational.
 
Exactly so:

"If I never loved I never would have cried."

He's retreated to a safe place but still looking out the window.
 Cynaera wrote:
Back in about 1967 or 1968, I was living in Carson City, Nevada. My parents had a stereo/TV sales and repair business.  People would drop off record players, sometimes with the records still in them. I got "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones (my FIRST listen) and "I Am A Rock."  I kept the records, and no one ever mentioned the loss when they claimed their record-players.  I was too young to know then that what came in was what should go out.  (Silly me.)

That was also the first time I'd ever heard Simon and Garfunkel. It took some time, but I finally understood "deep."  I listened to this 45 countless times, and I think it was part of what led me to appreciate so many types of music.

I only wish Mom and Dad were still alive - I'd love to ask them about that time in our lives...
 
Love reading posts like these. Thank you for the vivid picture of nostalgia. I love this tune for so many reasons. Too many to list.
Back in about 1967 or 1968, I was living in Carson City, Nevada. My parents had a stereo/TV sales and repair business.  People would drop off record players, sometimes with the records still in them. I got "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones (my FIRST listen) and "I Am A Rock."  I kept the records, and no one ever mentioned the loss when they claimed their record-players.  I was too young to know then that what came in was what should go out.  (Silly me.)

That was also the first time I'd ever heard Simon and Garfunkel. It took some time, but I finally understood "deep."  I listened to this 45 countless times, and I think it was part of what led me to appreciate so many types of music.

I only wish Mom and Dad were still alive - I'd love to ask them about that time in our lives...
 bachbeet wrote:
What is good about the song is that the writer (Simon) is not really in favor of the stance taken.  He's aware of the cynical bitter stance taken by the protagonist.  He knows it's not really something to be proud of to be like this:

I touch no one and no one touches me.
I am a rock,
I am an island.

And a rock feels no pain;
And an island never cries.

This is not a really healthy way to be.


It seems as if he's writing about a temporary response to an emotionally painful incident.  I don't find it to be as much "cynical" as it is self-preservational.

I am a rock,
I am an island...

 
Indeed I am. 
What is good about the song is that the writer (Simon) is not really in favor of the stance taken.  He's aware of the cynical bitter stance taken by the protagonist.  He knows it's not really something to be proud of to be like this:

I touch no one and no one touches me.
I am a rock,
I am an island.

And a rock feels no pain;
And an island never cries.

This is not a really healthy way to be.


My anthem as an angst-riddled kid. {#Wink} {#Rolleyes}
I feel much better these days. {#Devil_pimp}
How YOU doin'? {#Wave}
This song pretty much sums up how I feel today
I assure you, Iraq is NOT an island....

sheesh!
 rtrudeau wrote:

Your post really bothers me ... you talk about your gym teacher / principal as if this behavior were somehow ok. I suppose it can be argued that "the young people of today" are overly privileged with their cell phones and iPads and whatnot. However, no one can tell me that it's ever okay for an authority figure to punch a student in the stomach or smash them into the wall.

You and I are about the same age. I remember sadistic teachers, some by name, and some of their behavior still has an effect on me. There's a good reason this kind of shit isn't tolerated any more.
 
Yup, same here. I used to dream of finding the sadists and pederasts on the teaching staff of my high school and giving them a taste of their own medicine. I can name a good few, including one c*cksucker who's a friend of my Dad's, so if I ever bump into him sparks and possibly body parts will fly. Our school was like Lord of the Flies, and indeed when I did that book for Eng Lit I immediately understood the point of it. Violence was an integral part of the school's fabric, ever-present in the air, and was meted out on a daily basis by the 'teachers' using various implements. I don't remember heads being smashed against walls by teachers, but I'm sure it happened.

Like you, that period had a profound and damaging effect on me and my fellow inmates.

Believe it or not, this was a big top-40 song and as serious as it is, my association with it is hanging out at the pool as a young teenager!

Sheer poetry!  One of their best!

Not a bit S and G fan, but this one is pretty good.


Bridge Over Troubled Water was NOT released in 1999!!!! Someone's got their statistics about 30 years off here. Absolutely great album and song.
One of my fave early S&G tunes. " Homeward Bound" is another.
 buddy wrote:
This is one of a handful of songs that changed my life during the summer of '65 when I was a 13 year old boy transitioning to the world of wonder and discovery that lies between innocence and reality.
 

I can relate...
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Our 8th grade gym teacher would punch kids in the stomach or smash them against the wall until they cried (really). He later became the school principal!
But try to tell that to the young people of today! . . .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eDaSvRO9xA


On the plus side, our English teacher played ELP's "Lucky Man" for us as an example of "pop poetry". Hey, it beat getting punched in the stomach!  ; )
 

British Columbia, eh? Figures.....

 

(For the uninformed British Columbia is a young resource-dependent colony and enjoys the highest property and violent crime rates in Canada.)


 On_The_Beach wrote:

Our 8th grade gym teacher would punch kids in the stomach or smash them against the wall until they cried (really). He later became the school principal!
But try to tell that to the young people of today! . . .

 
Your post really bothers me ... you talk about your gym teacher / principal as if this behavior were somehow ok. I suppose it can be argued that "the young people of today" are overly privileged with their cell phones and iPads and whatnot. However, no one can tell me that it's ever okay for an authority figure to punch a student in the stomach or smash them into the wall.

You and I are about the same age. I remember sadistic teachers, some by name, and some of their behavior still has an effect on me. There's a good reason this kind of shit isn't tolerated any more.


This really is one of those great profound songs that is still worth playing...  love it...




yeah...  love it...




very groovy...


 On_The_Beach wrote:

Our 8th grade gym teacher would punch kids in the stomach or smash them against the wall until they cried (really). He later became the school principal!
But try to tell that to the young people of today! . . .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eDaSvRO9xA


On the plus side, our English teacher played ELP's "Lucky Man" for us as an example of "pop poetry". Hey, it beat getting punched in the stomach!  ; )
 
If my 8th grade teacher had done that to any of us, we would have killed him. Big ups to your English teacher, though. {#Dancingbanana}
 romeotuma wrote:


I love this song...  it is amazing how fast time goes by...
 


Seems like I said this yesterday...  I have always loved this song...



 westslope wrote:
Our 6th grade teacher would discuss the first Star Trek shows.He was a graduate biology student at Carleton University (Ottawa).  We also did applied field ecology, grafted windows on to eggs, did abstract surreal art.  Life was good!
 
Our 8th grade gym teacher would punch kids in the stomach or smash them against the wall until they cried (really). He later became the school principal!
But try to tell that to the young people of today! . . .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eDaSvRO9xA


On the plus side, our English teacher played ELP's "Lucky Man" for us as an example of "pop poetry". Hey, it beat getting punched in the stomach!  ; )


 Randomax wrote:
I was fortunate enough to have a Social Studies teacher in 8th grade (Mr. Skipper) who changed my life....he would put on LP's during class.  He played this album one day and had us write a paper on what the songs meant!  Life changing I'm tellin' ya!!!  He played Dylan, too!  What a guy.   
 

Our 6th grade teacher would discuss the first Star Trek shows.

He was a graduate biology student at Carleton University (Ottawa).  We also did applied field ecology, grafted windows on to eggs, did abstract surreal art.  Life was good!




I love this song...  it is amazing how fast time goes by...


Right from the start of the song I remembered the two closing verses to come, an image that had impressed me deeply when I was younger. What impresses me now, hearing the tune again after years, is the harsh bitterness that speaks out of each single line.

You're on a roll tonight, Bill....{#Bounce}
i bought this 45 when it was new. hearing this again reminds me how great they were and inspires me to download their albums. they stand the test of time. 
Al Kooperesque organ in b/g—as on Highway 61 Revisited



This song is soooo good for the ears...


if this is a rock, spongebob is a hard-rock{#Bounce}
 radiojunkie wrote:
Man, all that teenage angst, so long ago.

Now replaced by much improved adult angst.
 
Aye, tis true. {#Sorry}

As Clyde Crashup would have said:

"That's dee as in dee, pressing as in pressing....DEE-pressing!"
Man, all that teenage angst, so long ago.

Now replaced by much improved adult angst.
I like this even better now than I did then!
 jagdriver wrote:
Time to go take a dump.
 

TMI
I was fortunate enough to have a Social Studies teacher in 8th grade (Mr. Skipper) who changed my life....he would put on LP's during class.  He played this album one day and had us write a paper on what the songs meant!  Life changing I'm tellin' ya!!!  He played Dylan, too!  What a guy.   
Time to go take a dump.
Seems like I remember Paul writing something to the effect that the lyrics to this one embarass him as being juvenile compared to his adult attitudes. 

Here we go...

Nevertheless a classic of course.


jagdriver wrote:
Mute


Yeah as if the Indigo Girls, Peter Gabriel (In your Eyes for chrissake?!?) and Glen Hansard played previously didn't do it already. This song actually brought me back.

 Pilgrim301 wrote:
I only like it b/c I've heard it so often.  I'd love to hear a remake by someone with today's sensibilities.  And tuned bass.
 
Check out the remake by Tommy Shaw and Jack Blades. It's got a more heavy, rock sound.
Mute
Ahhh....my theme song. Words to live by......

Help, I'm a ROCK!

AC, DC, they had a SWIM-ming pool!

(with a nod and a wink to the departed Frank Zappa)

Ditto.   -     9.

romeotuma wrote:



Poetic lyrics... great harmony...  virtuoso music...  Paul Simon is at the top, tied with Bob Dylan as the American greatest...