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Yes — Long Distance Runaround & The Fish
Album: Fragile
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2058









Released: 1971
Length: 5:56
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Long distance runaround
Long time waiting to feel the sound
I still remember the dream there
I still remember the time you said goodbye
Did we really tell lies
Letting in the sunshine
Did we really count to one hundrer

Cold summer listening
Hot colour melting the anger to stone
I still remember the dream there
I still remember the time you said goodbye
Did we really tell lies
Did we really count to one hundred

(repeat verses)

Looking for the sunshine

[instrumental]
Schindleria praematurus
Schindleria praematurus
Schindleria praematurus
Schindleria praematurus
Comments (415)add comment
awesome stuff.

the very first ( of many ) album I bought.
 dast60 wrote:
Sounds very outdated, prog rock at its most indulgent, needs to be left back in the 70's.
 
When you consider the fact that YES was way ahead of it's time, I would have to disagree.  Time has finally caught up with them and they still sound awesome.  IMHO!!!!!!!
 buddy wrote:
Classic prog rock from one of my all-time favorite bands of any genre.  Thanks for playing this, Bill.  Now, how about Gates of Delirium or The Revealing Science of God? 
 
Yes! Good call on those two songs, both favourites of mine.  I often joke with friends, it’s kind of hard having a favourite song that’s over 20 minutes long. You can’t just pop it on at a party and go “check this out”.
 dast60 wrote:
Sounds very outdated, prog rock at its most indulgent, needs to be left back in the 70's.
 
Ummmmm...don't think so sport.
Went see The Nice at London's Royal Festival Hall in 1970, and Yes were the support! I was blown away, went out and bought their albums, learned to play bass, and eventually owned a Rickenbacker like Chris Squire. What a long time ago that was. Still listen to this with the volume turned up.
Sounds very outdated, prog rock at its most indulgent, needs to be left back in the 70's.
I'm glad i got to see them twice, once in okc and tulsa,
This song vividly takes me back to my junior year of high school. Wow! Great song, great group.  
 Bellringer2020 wrote:
The bass playing in this song is pretty fantastic
 
It's actually two songs -- and the second part is all about the bass playing. Each of the band members had a solo composition on the album, and this one ("The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)") was basist Chris Squire's.  It features about four different bass tracks layered on top of each other.
It's Friday afternoon.

Its the bass. It's the bass. It's the bass.

 
 Bellringer2020 wrote:
The bass playing in this song is pretty fantastic
 
Chris Squire.  The glue that held the band together through their many permutations.

R.I.P.
Yes is a lot like Rush in that people love to hate on them.  Rush somehow turned that around in the last 15 years, but not as much for Yes.  I think the ever changing direction and lineup caused the casual observer to declare that they are silly band with no worth.  They are remarkable, just as I can't stand DMB, but respect that they are a good band that writes good music (that I happen not to like).
Bill is always willing to let us face our youthfull errors. 
Steven Wilson has been remixing the Yes catalog and the results are remarkable. 
 SeriousLee wrote:
Sure beats listening to the Dixie Chicks.
 
Perhaps.  But where can you find a radio station that switches from the Dixie Chicks to early Yes?

Love it. 

In memory of Chris Squire, perhaps one of the best and certainly one of the most innovative bass players of the period.  
What a complete cacophany!
The bass playing in this song is pretty fantastic
Classic prog rock from one of my all-time favorite bands of any genre.  Thanks for playing this, Bill.  Now, how about Gates of Delirium or The Revealing Science of God? 
That is some kick-ass bass line...Love this old Yes!
 jbuhl wrote:

He is up there for sure.

I think we should repurpose Rushmore with Entwistle, Squire and ....(Lee or Jones or Bruce or....)

 
LEVIN
Image result for over their heads
Carefully listening to this song makes me think that, whatever many pure Yes fans deplored at that time, Trevor Horn did not betray the band's essence on 90125 and Big Generator (although he was less involved in that second new-era album). On the contrary, I think he just took that chemistry to a different dimension by emphasizing some distinctive accents, like the bass+guitar osmosis on this track which reminds me of songs like It Can Happen. And he didn't ask Jon to adopt a different singing style either. Anyway, I just venerate the two lives of that band at equal level, despite I fell in love with them 'only' around 1983.
 meatmike wrote:
I believe I actually saw God at a Yes concert...

 
"Two men say they're Jesus, one of them must be wrong."
It's always great to hear music that sounds unique yet still provides beautiful melody and virtuosic performances. There were certainly times when Yes lost the script but this is a great example of a band pushing boundaries but knowing how to harness their impulses to craft a very musical performance.
 
hate to sound like a hater but just say NO to yes 
Sure beats listening to the Dixie Chicks.
 aspicer wrote:
Great to see them finally accepted to R&R Hall of Fame this year.  Check out their performances that I believe is still being re-run on HBO.  Other highlights were Pearl Jam, ELO, and Joan Baez, among others.

 
No one has ever given a Hall of Fame acceptance speech quite like Rick Wakeman.  Worth Googling if only to see the rest of the band cringing and cracking up.
 LowPhreak wrote:
Yeah but...it was edgy! And anti anti-establishment! And, "We don't know what the fuck we want, just something that annoys the shit out of everyone else...."
 
Gotta agree with that, but musically of course, there was no comparison.
Clearly Punk stirred up the shit politically and in the complacent music biz, and there's something to be said for that.
 Prius wrote:
Still one of my absolute favourites. Good ol' times...
Thank you Bill! 

 
DITTO
 idiot_wind wrote:
Its the bass. It's the bass. It's the bass. 

Chris Squire, maybe the greatest for RnR bass playing.  

 
He is up there for sure.

I think we should repurpose Rushmore with Entwistle, Squire and ....(Lee or Jones or Bruce or....)
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Right; a bunch of spoiled brats who couldn't play a note, sticking pins in their faces and spitting on the audience.
Gee, I wonder why it didn't last?

 
Yeah but...it was edgy! And anti anti-establishment! And, "We don't know what the fuck we want, just something that annoys the shit out of everyone else...."
I remember this coming out around the time that "underground" FM radio hit my hometown - I have a great fondness for the memories of being introduced to bands like Yes on WRQR. But at the same time I didn't quite realize this was also the moment that radio became segregated. My old hometown AM radio station played everything: soul, R&B, beach, country, rock, and pop. As much as I loved the underground radio scene (it prompted me to work in radio for a few years in the early 70s) I now see it as the beginning of the heavily-regimented "format" radio we have today. I can remember playing acts like Earth Wind & Fire and the Isley Bros on my radio show and being criticized for breaking format.

It's one of the reasons I've loved RP since I discovered it way back in 2002. Thanks for playing everything.
 Jota wrote:
Thank goodness for punk rock.
 
Right; a bunch of spoiled brats who couldn't play a note, sticking pins in their faces and spitting on the audience.
Gee, I wonder why it didn't last?
Thank goodness for punk rock.
i never tire of early yes  {#Music}
 aspicer wrote:
Great to see them finally accepted to R&R Hall of Fame this year.  Check out their performances that I believe is still being re-run on HBO.  Other highlights were Pearl Jam, ELO, and Joan Baez, among others.

 
I just wish Jon and the rest of the boys would kiss and make up and get back together
Great to see them finally accepted to R&R Hall of Fame this year.  Check out their performances that I believe is still being re-run on HBO.  Other highlights were Pearl Jam, ELO, and Joan Baez, among others.
3 - No Hum
Really no hum. {#Stupid}
Now you're on a winner... yes! YES! Fantastique!
I believe I actually saw God at a Yes concert...
{#Whisper}
Its the bass. It's the bass. It's the bass. 

Chris Squire, maybe the greatest for RnR bass playing.  
It's about damn time YES were inducted in the RRHOF!
Progressive rock at it's best. Complex song structures, unparalleled musicianship... it really gets no better than this.
 xtalman wrote:

Late 70's but yea.

 
1971
 bm.deavenport613 wrote:
Rolled many a joint to this song and album back in the mid 70's.

 
Late 70's but yea.
Still one of my absolute favourites. Good ol' times...
Thank you Bill! 
omg and if you weren't there is no way to describe being inside this!!!
Robin Trower, PT now Yes, I am feeling loved...
One of my few 10s here. This was the first record I ever bought and still one of my faves. My older sister knew Bruford and even did some photography for one his solo albums. Cool guy, awesome drummer and one of the best recordings of all time.


 I'm down with the complete package !  ch83575 wrote:
If this was just the drums and the bass I think it would be better.

 


"I still remember the dream there..." Wow, how amazing this song was — and is, after all this time! So innovative, so magical & unique!
If this was just the drums and the bass I think it would be better.
great segue - dixie chix to yes! keepin' it fresh.
Rolled many a joint to this song and album back in the mid 70's.
When I listen to this, I try to find if and how they "break the song" into concurrent, separate tracks (using multiple takes) and then stitch it together into one song. 

I mean...there's no way they did this all in one take,is there?  Because it sure sounds like it. 

And Chris Squire's bass is soooooo freakin good.  
One of the first albums I bought as a kid in the early 70s on my long distance, 40+ year astral journey through prog, and Fragile has remained one of the best.

Still traveling...

Pure genius. It was the second album I purchased after Dark Side of The Moon.
I've seen them do the entire album in the round twice and the track itself half a dozen times over the years.
I miss Chris.
 markybx wrote:
Sorry, but I find Yes exceptionally irritating (especially on headphones) just as I did at school when "everyone" was into Yes, hence my interest in Floyd, ELP, Led Zep, Tull, King Crimson etc, even Genesis.
Maybe 3 is a bit harsh -> 4
 
I don't find them irritating but I didn't find them as fascinating as I did the bands you listed. I didn't understand why everyone was so into them. I went with a 7. They just okay for me.
Always loved this arrangement, especially the drums - every 5th beat on the snare
 markybx wrote:
Sorry, but I find Yes exceptionally irritating (especially on headphones) just as I did at school when "everyone" was into Yes, hence my interest in Floyd, ELP, Led Zep, Tull, King Crimson etc, even Genesis.
Maybe 3 is a bit harsh -> 4

 
I followed Bruford into KC and then into Genesis - there is a common thread to a lot of the bands you listed.

As a teenager I found Yes exceptionally uplifting and empowering - loved the music and packaging and the art.

 If I was feeling all angsty that day, I'd crank up the Zeppelin or the middle (Bruford) period Crimson. 
Sorry, but I find Yes exceptionally irritating (especially on headphones) just as I did at school when "everyone" was into Yes, hence my interest in Floyd, ELP, Led Zep, Tull, King Crimson etc, even Genesis.
Maybe 3 is a bit harsh -> 4
Squire and Bruford - great stuff.
 GeorgeMWoods wrote:
Hate this song. Boring, no worse, irritating, two dimensional. But that's just one guy's opinion. 

 
If you think this is two dimensional, you're not listening.

 

I could listen to that bass walk all damn day. So delicious.


 Relayer wrote:
Happy birthday Chris.  Miss you.

 
{#Heartkiss}
Hate this song. Boring, no worse, irritating, two dimensional. But that's just one guy's opinion. 
 rabaak wrote:

I bet you would like Neil Sedaka and the Captain& Tennille instead. They had #1 singles  about this time in the 70's.
And then came disco.
Thank God we had 'Yes', Emerson Lake&Palmer, Eagles, Genesis etc.
There was some pretty awful music playing on the radio at that time. It was a blessing when they started putting casette tapes in cars so you didn't have to listen to the radio.

 
Don't forget the epitome of 70s schlock

Yes eventually wallowed in excess and pointlessness but hells yeah they made some great music.  
Happy birthday Chris.  Miss you.
 Skydog wrote:

yep, when cassette tapes came out it was a god-send because radio at that time was unlistenablea,,,and never returned

 
Well actually there were some exceptional FM radio stations back in the day.  CHUM-FM in Toronto had a good reputation at one point.

CHOM-FM out of Montreal was fantastic  —  and truly bilingual.  It showcased modern Quebec pop music at the same time that it played an eclectic assortment of music much like radio paradise: blues, jazz, progressive rock, classical, etc., etc.

I suppose the trouble is that it was next to impossible to pick up these and other 'underground' radio stations on a car radio in most of North America.

Unfortunately, none of these 'underground' FM radio stations commercially survived.  Now we have the internet, hyper mark-up language, etc., and for those inclined, it is easy to stream RP to an automobile from just about anywhere on the planet.

Screw the 'good ol' days' concept.  These ARE the good days!
 
Fuck yeahhhhhh!!!
Happy{#Dance}...correction "was"  you faded it out{#Frown}
I got Cowboy Junkies on the PSD button, Ha-Ha!
 rabaak wrote:


There was some pretty awful music playing on the radio at that time. It was a blessing when they started putting casette tapes in cars so you didn't have to listen to the radio.

 
yep, when cassette tapes came out it was a god-send because radio at that time was unlistenablea,,,and never returned
 Why_Nath wrote:
Dear god please make it STOP!

 
I bet you would like Neil Sedaka and the Captain& Tennille instead. They had #1 singles  about this time in the 70's.
And then came disco.
Thank God we had 'Yes', Emerson Lake&Palmer, Eagles, Genesis etc.
There was some pretty awful music playing on the radio at that time. It was a blessing when they started putting casette tapes in cars so you didn't have to listen to the radio.
 Skydog wrote:
It's not to late, hit next, please.

 
sounds like they are playing the whole thing,...also to much Pink Floyd
 idiot_wind wrote:
I don't think there was ever another band  (maybe grateful dead) in which the bass player (Chris Squire RIP) drove so much of the "sound" for each song. 

You can hear a a distinct bass groove on practically every song...like this one.  
 

 
Huge Phil Lesh fan here, so I agree.  However, there was another band.  Listen to the first side of Quadrophenia by the Who (John Entwhistle RIP).  Maybe not every song, but when the ox was driving the sound, he was *driving*.
Hello! Hall of Fame!
This is very good, live version is even better (Yessongs)
 idiot_wind wrote:
I don't think there was ever another band  (maybe grateful dead) in which the bass player (Chris Squire RIP) drove so much of the "sound" for each song. 

You can hear a a distinct bass groove on practically every song...like this one.  
 
He was the only member in each incarnation of "Yes"
The Fish (second part of this tune) was his song, since everyone took a solo turn on this album. All the parts except drums were his, I think. 
It's not to late, hit next, please.
Oh, Yes ... I thought I had recognized it {#Cheers}
I don't think there was ever another band  (maybe grateful dead) in which the bass player (Chris Squire RIP) drove so much of the "sound" for each song. 

You can hear a a distinct bass groove on practically every song...like this one.  
 
I recently listened to the whole of 90215 (both sides on Vynil) for the first time for a long time.

That is a good album. 
LONG LIVE PROG!
 
I will always and forever dig the wild contrapuntal funkiness and Challenger Deep bass lines that pulsate and shine in this masterpiece!
 Why_Nath wrote:
Dear god please make it STOP!

 
You are crap at fishing.
Dear god please make it STOP!
R.I.P. Chris Squire.
......and these covers!!  {#Notworthy}....

Cheers to that! {#Cheers}  - now THAT's composing! Gooooood ol' times... and will never get forgotten!

 

 

 


YES! Always a rocker, with that killer, sub-aquatic bass sound and jazzy mad musicality! Sad to hear of Chris Squire's passing today...
 idiot_wind wrote:
Chris Squire...one of the best bass players in RnR and was the glue that held this band together.. 

 
Yes and yes.  Chris's playing was also a big influence on song writers and occasional bass players like Steven Wilson.  

Bill just told us that Squire died from leukaemia.    Sad day.    A very sad day.  
Just a wonderful bit of prog rock.
Chris Squire...one of the best bass players in RnR and was the glue that held this band together.. 
 hempmandan wrote:
Roundabout is a 10 due to its ridiculous groove and bassline
 
It was brilliantly different and beautiful in its time, and I think that its worth has lasted.
Absolutely NEVER gets old.
 wgsu_1978 wrote:
Only a 9. The truly godlike Yes is probably too long to be played here.
 
Which is which ?
 ScottishWillie wrote:
I had to keep my love of this album quiet in the late 70s when I became a punk.
 

Ha!  Were you forced to bury all of your Yes, King Crimson & Genesis albums in the backyard for about 10 years?
I had to keep my love of this album quiet in the late 70s when I became a punk. But I now feel secure enough to come out and say I loved this pretentions nonsense then and I love it now. 
Only a 9. The truly godlike Yes is probably too long to be played here.
Roundabout is a 10 due to its ridiculous groove and bassline

Love Bill Bruford - wish he'd come out of retirement and be paired up with Gavin Harrison in King Crimson.
Fond memories of my fist time smoking pot listening to Round a bout..
 ScottishWillie wrote:

Is Roger Dean getting royalties for the use of his work in Avatar? If not, why not!

 
Roger Dean is not getting royalties because his copyright infringement lawsuit against James Cameron was dismissed.

from the decision:
"The Court begins with what may be Plaintiff’s most compelling argument for substantial similarity: the comparison between Avatar’s “Hallelujah Mountains” and Plaintiff’s works featuring floating islands — including Floating Islands, The 1st of April, and Stairway to Heaven. The works are indisputably similar insofar as they present the natural world in a fantastical way by depicting airborne land masses. But Plaintiff does not have a monopoly on the idea of floating or airborne land, an idea that has been around since at least 1726, when Jonathan Swift published his classic Gulliver’s Travels."

Is Roger Dean getting royalties for the use of his work in Avatar? If not, why not!


C'mon Bill, just play the whole album next time, would you?

Sounds great! 
Beautiful segue from Porcupine Tree's Mellotron Scratch! Niiice!{#Guitarist}
 Lauriea wrote:
Reminds me of Supertramp

 
Other way around dude.

(kids these days; what're ya gonna do?){#Rolleyes}
 westslope wrote:

Yes, Jon's voice works sometimes, and then often it grates.  Maybe that is why I listen to Yes almost exclusively by myself.  

Relayer is amazing.  Still my favourite. 

 
I agree, Relayer is my favourite Yes album as well. I remember seeing Yes on the tour supporting the Relayer album. Alan White had a massive drum kit with 'North' Drums. The song 'sound chaser' was thunderous. {#Drummer}
This sounds a lot better now than when I heard it as a kid.
For a while there, Yes was unstoppable and on track to be THE band of progressive rock music to save the world from mediocre music.

But after that brilliant period of 1971-1973, they started going off the deep end. Instead of being close to the edge, they went OVER the edge with Tales from Topographic Oceans.  They still have many great follow up albums; Relayer, Going for the One, Drama, Big Generator (give it a serious listen as a whole), Talk, but they also had a lot of strange disconnected albums; Tales, Tormato, Union, etc.
 Middleton wrote:
I understand Yes' place in rock history.  But I turn off RP every time this song is played. 

 
Good point! Yes may have sounded cool and innovative back in the seventies but right now I think it's no more than a piece of rock history.
I understand Yes' place in rock history.  But I turn off RP every time this song is played. 
 jagdriver wrote:
If only they had used a different lead singer; then I might have gotten into these guys.

 
Yes, Jon's voice works sometimes, and then often it grates.  Maybe that is why I listen to Yes almost exclusively by myself.  

Relayer is amazing.  Still my favourite. 
 Lauriea wrote:
Reminds me of Supertramp

 
Sort of.  

Saw Supertramp in Calgary-1975.  It would have been enjoyable except for all the screaming high school students.   
If only they had used a different lead singer; then I might have gotten into these guys.
Well I felt like a total doofus but a happy doofus when this started playing. I just said "Yes!"
 aspicer wrote:
Always KEY to include The Fish!!! Way to go Bill!
Absolutely, although I prefer the live version which includes Squire's amazing bass acrobatics.
Reminds me of Supertramp