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Emmylou Harris — Sweet Old World
Album: Wrecking Ball
Avg rating:
6.9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 326








Released: 1995
Length: 4:54
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(Lucinda Williams)

See what you lost when you left
This world, this sweet old world
See what you lost when you left
This world, this sweet old world.

The breath from your own lips, the touch of fingertips
A sweet and tender kiss
The sound of a midnight train, wearing someone's ring
Someone calling your name
Somebody so warm cradled in your arm
Didn't you think you were worth anything.

See what you lost when you left
This world, this sweet old world
See what you lost when you left
This world, this sweet old world.

Millions of us in love, promises made good
Your own flesh and blood
Looking for some truth, dancing with no shoes
The beat, the rhythm, the blues
The pounding of your heart's drum together with another one
Didn't you think anyone loved you.

See what you lost when you left
This world, this sweet old world
See what you lost when you left
This world, this sweet old world...
Comments (9)add comment
Love Emmylou's version but Lucinda's original is truly heartbreaking.  
Gorgeous song written by Lucinda Williams, and justice done by Emmylou.
This song is nice but sounds an awful lot like 4 Strong Winds written Ian Tyson and performed by Ian & Sylvia in the early 1960s.
Such a sweet and sad song. It makes me long for friends who are gone.

Emmylou Harris by ~christinik2000
©2010 ~christinik2000



Emmylou Harris with Hot Band - "One of these Days" Live

"Earl Montgomery song "One of these Days" Live. Emmylou once said this is her mother's favorite song and she plays when she can for her mum. "


Chet Atkins - "Mr. Sandman" (1954)

"  "Mr. Sandman" (sometimes rendered as "Mister Sandman") is a popular song written by Pat Ballard which was published in 1954 and first recorded in that year by The Chordettes. The song's lyrics convey a request to "Mr. Sandman" to "bring me a dream," the word "dream" ambiguously referring to a real significant other as well as to a sleeping dream - the traditional association with the folkloric figure, the sandman. The pronoun used to refer to the desired dream is often changed depending on the sex of the singer or group performing the song.
In 1978,
Emmylou Harris, Dolly Parton, and Linda Ronstadt recorded a song. The song was released by Harris as a single in 1981. "

Emmylou and Neil...for me, it doesn\'t get much better :)
This whole album is great. I was camping out at Joshua Tree one winter and heard this song coming out of an old VW bus and thought of Gram Parsons and the gang just hanging out at JT. Frednic