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Yes — And You And I
Album: Close To The Edge
Avg rating:
7.5

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2443









Released: 1972
Length: 9:58
Plays (last 30 days): 1
'''I. Cord of Life'''

A man conceived a moment's answer to the dream
Staying the flowers daily, sensing all the themes
As a foundation left to create the spiral aim
A movement regained and regarded both the same
All complete in the sight of seeds of life with you

Changed only for a sight of sound, the space agreed
Between the picture of time behind the face of need
Coming quickly to terms of all expression laid
Emotions revealed as the ocean maid
All complete in the sight of seeds of life with you

Coins and crosses
(Turn round tailor, assaulting)
Never know their fruitless worth
(all the mornings of the interest shown,
presenting one another to the cord)
Cords are broken
(All left dying, rediscovered
Of the door that turned round)
Locked inside the mother Earth
(To close the cover, all the
interest shown)
They won't hide, hold, they won't tell you
(To turn one another, to the
sign at the time float your climb)
Watching the world, watching all of the world
Watching us go by

And you and I climb over the sea to the valley
And you and I reached out for reasons to call

'''II. Eclipse'''

Coming quickly to terms of all expression laid
Emotions revealed as the ocean maid
As a movement regained and regarded both the same
All complete in the sight of seeds of life with you

'''III. The preacher, the teacher'''

Sad preacher nailed upon the coloured door of time
Insane teacher be there reminded of the rhyme
There'll be no mutant enemy we shall certify
Political ends as sad remains will die
Reach out as forward tastes begin to enter you
Oooh, ooh

I listened hard but could not see
Life tempo change out and inside me
The preacher trained in all to lose his name
The teacher travels, asking to be shown the same
In the end we'll agree, we'll accept, we'll immortalize
That the truth of man maturing in his eyes
All complete in the sight of seeds of life with you

Coming quickly to terms of all expression laid
As a moment regained and regarded both the same
Emotion revealed as the ocean maid
A clearer future, morning, evening, nights with you

IV Apocalypse

And you and I climb, crossing the shapes of the morning
And you and I reach over the sun for the river
And you and I climb, clearer towards the movement
And you and I called over valleys of endless seas
Comments (748)add comment
Folks, you may or many not like Jon Anderson's vocals but, frankly, he does not sound like a girl.  Seriously.   
ALL HAIL PROG!
Simply a classic. Absolutely beautiful!
#1 Album of all time (by anyone). If you're a musician, it's even higher than that! (would that be Eleven?)
I guess you had to be there... shrug
One of their best songs ever {#Bananajam}
 mread wrote:

When listening to Jon Anderson you sort-of think you're listening to a guy.  These two, on the other hand, sound like fine female singers:
• Greg Gilbert from the Delays
Michael Miller
 

And the vocalist from Silversun Pickups who for a year or two I thought/assumed was a woman until I saw a performance on Austin City Limits. I grew less impressed with the band, so when he tunes in, I psd out.  
CRESCENDO. 
A top 3  on the childhood albums list. Still and always a favorite. I grew up looking at their album covers, listening to their music. Such a big influence in my life and so it goes on and on. Thank you YES. 
 Stephen_Phillips wrote:

Quite right.  Jon Anderson has a naturally high voice - partly because of his small stature, but mostly due to nature.

There is a big difference between someone singing in their naturally high vocal range and someone else switching into falsetto to reach the same notes. Two names come immediately to mind... Sam Smith and Chris Martin and just about every male contestant on American Idol and The Xfactor talent shows these days.

Some other singers with naturally high voices - Robert Plant, Rod Stewart and Neil Young.

Would any fellow RP commentators care to give some more examples of male singers with naturally high voices?
 
When listening to Jon Anderson you sort-of think you're listening to a guy.  These two, on the other hand, sound like fine female singers:
• Greg Gilbert from the Delays
Michael Miller
 Stephen_Phillips wrote:

Quite right.  Jon Anderson has a naturally high voice - partly because of his small stature, but mostly due to nature.

There is a big difference between someone singing in their naturally high vocal range and someone else switching into falsetto to reach the same notes. Two names come immediately to mind... Sam Smith and Chris Martin and just about every male contestant on American Idol and The Xfactor talent shows these days.

Some other singers with naturally high voices - Robert Plant, Rod Stewart and Neil Young.

Would any fellow RP commentators care to give some more examples of male singers with naturally high voices?
 

Adam Levine of Maroon 5
Whoa dude
 Stephen_Phillips wrote:

Would any fellow RP commentators care to give some more examples of male singers with naturally high voices?

Midge Ure and Geddy Lee come to mind, although what is 'natural' is a moot point. I recall reading somewhere Neil Young switched to a higher range early in his career. What is assumed and what is part of an extensive vocal range?



 

Ahhhh. Back when albums were special. They had their own identity.  A snap shot. A moment of time.  

And that freakin Chris Squire bass. 
Ahhhh, the words. Now I get it. I loved this song years ago, but never had the words. Now I knew what I was screaming in my car all those years ago as the cassette , was spinning out this song. 
"Sad preacher nailed upon the coloured door of time."
Some of Yes' output was self-indulgent garbage but this album and a few others figure among the best from the period.

Frankly, I am amazed at how well this song and others by Yes have aged, but then I guess I am just a smelly old white dude with fossilized tastes in music.    Hopefully, not too many will spit at me on the street.
 SomersetBob wrote:
Part of the soundtrack of my teenage life - it gets a 10 from me.
 
Just a few years ahead of you. Same effect.
Throughout my life I have become totally besotted by bands. This usually only lasts a few months. After the first love some bands stay firm friends and some become an embarrassing past relationship. ‘Yes’ were my fist obsession and I’m glad to say I still enjoy staying in contact with them through radio paradise.
Saw them do this whole thing LIVE in the 70's . An unforgettable experience !
Our 70s Soundtrack, for better or worse. Did not much dig them, then. More of a fan of Prog generally, these days. This one really builds up steam as it goes along. Starship Trooper is my jam though.
The recent remixes of the Yes catalog for digital by the amazing Steven Wilson are worth seeking out if you were a fan of Yes back in the day. I surely was, and hearing them again reminded me that no matter how muddy they sounded on my old VW's 8-track, it was glorious music if you were living in a rural area and your only idea of a bigger outside world was the "underground" FM station you could pick up after dark.
 make it stop! it keeps going and going and going...
During high school in 70's not everybody loved this, but most of the kids I grew up with did. No matter what album, there's be times when we'd lay on the floor, listen to the music, read the sleeve notes and try to figure out what they were singing about. The music was enough even if we couldn't exactly connect the words to the feelings.
Bumped my rating up to 9 since recently seeing the Yessongs film.

I used to have the LP until I left it on my turntable, and it melted in the sun {#Embarassed}. I kept the cover, though. Great artwork. 
Ahhhhh....the bass of Chris Squire. It's pretty groovy. 
 CHuLoYo wrote:

Why? Must a man have a bass voice? In what world? The voice is technically good, nothing to criticism. 

 
Quite right.  Jon Anderson has a naturally high voice - partly because of his small stature, but mostly due to nature.

There is a big difference between someone singing in their naturally high vocal range and someone else switching into falsetto to reach the same notes. Two names come immediately to mind... Sam Smith and Chris Martin and just about every male contestant on American Idol and The Xfactor talent shows these days.

Some other singers with naturally high voices - Robert Plant, Rod Stewart and Neil Young.

Would any fellow RP commentators care to give some more examples of male singers with naturally high voices?
Merde
Beautiful song, thanks RP
Part of the soundtrack of my teenage life - it gets a 10 from me.
Wonderful to listen to on a hot, steam summer day! Yes!
Love his voice - part of the orchestral texture of the music
Please make this croaking and squeaking stop. Before another Rush is inspired.
One of the defining Prog  Rock albums of all time. Brilliant!  (Classic track)
I decrease to 5 - Decent
To me this is 7 - Quite Likeable
Maybe I'd like this song if I could ever have made friends with Jon Anderson's voice.
Yes had tremendous potential, but delivered relatively few great songs.
Now I know where Michael Stipe got his lyric writing style.
Yet another Yes song with amazing musicianship and earnestly sung lyric that sound as though they were google translated from English to Russian to Japanese to Latin and back to English.
Wow, I remember when this came out. Seems like only yesterday.
Always wondered what stimulants were used to aid in the writing of Yes' rather "eclectic" lyrics:

Coming quickly to terms of all expression laid
Emotions revealed as the ocean maid
As a movement regained and regarded both the same
All complete in the sight of seeds of life with you
Sad preacher nailed upon the coloured door of time
Insane teacher be there reminded of the rhyme
There'll be no mutant enemy we shall certify
Political ends as sad remains will die
Reach out as forward tastes begin to enter you
YEEESSSS!!!
 treatment_bound wrote:

Did they really play a whole side of "Topo" in concert?  There must have been a massive rush to the bathroom & beer garden during that stretch...

 
Wakeman tells a story of having nothing to do, and the roadie below his rig asks him through the grate if he needs anything. "A chicken curry." and a few minutes later while the (vegetarian) band is playing their hearts out, he's sitting there eating his curry. {#Bananapiano}
Seen them do this so many times. My favorite was the Union tour, with Jon standing in the middle soaking up/radiating the energy and grandeur of the big plodding finish. What a wonderful thing.

This album is the pinnacle of the 70s, easily. 
 finoufk wrote:
love the music, hate the voice {#Doh}

 
Why? Must a man have a bass voice? In what world? The voice is technically good, nothing to criticism. 


Saw them play this album, in order, in its entirety, in 2014 at an outdoor venue in Boston.  Was surprised at how well I remembered the lyrics and instrumental solos!

New singer (Jon Davison) was spot on, and Chris Squire looked as healthy as ever.  Missed Bill Bruford, but Alan White had loads of energy.
love the music, hate the voice {#Doh}
I always loved how Yes gave their distinctly deeply lyrical music the full orchestrality it deserved... Transcendent, mind-bending stuff
Well, I loved it when I was a kid, but it doesn't seem to have aged all that well.
Heh, maybe that makes two of us.
I have never been a big Yes fan, but I admire their complexity and innovation
Seems like 100 years ago. 
 Oliv wrote:
This song brings me 35 years back :)

 
Hell, almost 45!
This song brings me 35 years back :)
Excellent !!!! 
Yes.  Most excellent indeed! 
Tedious cacophony.
While not one for remakes, the Disturbed version of this is genuinely intense and most excellent.

Who knew the guttural scream chord could elicit such range and amazing depth?
Uplifting music right when I needed it most as a teenager.
Most Excellent Song !
Yes!
Sublime. I remember seeing them play this in the 1970s at the old Cow Palace in the SF Bay Area - I was young and impressionable then, as I still am now - love it!
 DaidyBoy wrote:
As a kid I was fascinated by the cover artwork on their stuff, which peered out at me temptingly from my local record shop window.  I'm glad I didn't buy any of it.

 
As a kid I was fascinated by the cover artwork on their stuff, which peered out at me temptingly from my local record shop window.  I'm glad I did buy quite a lot of it!
 chinaski wrote:
Beautiful..and just a wee bit out of reach for Steven Wilson.....

 
Oh yeah?    I don't think so....  
Yes has always been a band I admire deeply but never really appreciate much...just a different style, a different flavor, technical, interesting, musical of course...but always sounds like we're slugging through the mud. That Rickenbacker chunky bass sound...when I wanted that phat rich Fender sound. Vive la difference
Just bumped this to 64 aac. Oh my.
Used to know a top-end system installer in the day when a $25,000 system was enough to buy a small house on the outskirts of town. This was one of his demo discs. Take that back, this was one of his LPs.
Beautiful..and just a wee bit out of reach for Steven Wilson, Younger Brother and God is an Astronaut..
I was taught if you don't have anything good to say, don't say anything at all.  So, in regards to this song--no comment.
Indescribably magnificent.
 wgsu_1978 wrote:

I saw them in Buffalo on the same tour. A great show, but the audience was unfairly hard on Patrick Moraz, the new keyboard player.

Also, when Jon Anderson announced that the band would play a song from Tales From Topographic Oceans, someone yelled "SIDE TWO!!!" To which Anderson replied, "uh, no, this is Side Three." 
 
Did they really play a whole side of "Topo" in concert?  There must have been a massive rush to the bathroom & beer garden during that stretch...
The Chris Squire bass work is one of a king, really great!
 idiot_wind wrote:
Oh my gosh. The trippy sound. The harmonics. The melodics. No strong back beat but a KILLER BASS.

Hooks are everywhere in this song...and it's a long freakin song!  And you can sing along with it as well as play air guitar as well as do a trippy kind of dance to it.

Who does this in 2015? Who even attempts this; let alone do it soooo freakin well.

 

 
I hear California DJs can toke up to it as well. {#Devil_pimp}{#Whipit}

Still love, love, love the tempo change with the organ chords. That's something that sadly got left in the 70s. 
 mgkiwi wrote:
Now I know why I was never a YES fan when younger - sounded crap then, sounds even bigger crap now!!  {#Moon}

 
Well then just stick to your Justin Bieber stuff, dude, it's a free world.

Meanwhile....best Yes tune EVER! 
 mgkiwi wrote:
Now I know why I was never a YES fan when younger - sounded crap then, sounds even bigger crap now!!  {#Moon}

 
Wait til you grow up musically, you'll get it.
Now I know why I was never a YES fan when younger - sounded crap then, sounds even bigger crap now!!  {#Moon}
 idiot_wind wrote:
Oh my gosh. The trippy sound. The harmonics. The melodics. No strong back beat but a KILLER BASS.

Hooks are everywhere in this song...and it's a long freakin song!  And you can sing along with it as well as play air guitar as well as do a trippy kind of dance to it.

Who does this in 2015? Who even attempts this; let alone do it soooo freakin well.

 

 
Total Mass Retain Flashback. Stopped in my tracks from the spoken "Okay" at the start. When the chime strikes, I am ensconced.
What music today could possibly captivate the way this did? So much layering. Long-format, auditory transportation.
This is probably why I seek out "cinematic" music - Winged Victory For The Sullen, The Cinematic Orchestra, Other Lives, to name a few.

Thank you, Bill. A much appreciated time-travel experience. Gotta dig out the vinyl....
As a kid I was fascinated by the cover artwork on their stuff, which peered out at me temptingly from my local record shop window.  I'm glad I didn't buy any of it.
I wish I was born earlier. So many good music and artists I missed.

What do we have now?
I like Tame Impala, Muse and an occasional Radiohead, but they are pale against the colours of the 60-80 music.
Who is coming to rescue the music? 
I know that Mitzi Munn is smiling up there.  Hope she has a chance to talk with Chris Squire. 
 Rachoh wrote:


 
Heavy burp?
1972 ... really takes me back.  Close to the Edge was a large part of my formative years.  
Love Jon's voice! Bill please play something from the Friends of Mr Cairo album!
Saw them in 1973. Debut of Close To The Edge. Incredible. Life changing. In my heart ever since.
One of the sweetest love songs ever  {#Notworthy} 
 justin4kick wrote:
5 years later punk hit the world like a comet and wiped away dinosaurs like Yes. We're lucky to have Bill as a curator who gets these relics out of the closet every now and then. Now please put this one back in and keep it there for at least another 3 years. 

 
That must be why Yes had their most commercially successful album in 1983, just as Punk was headed the way of the Dodo bird. 
 ShaunJ wrote:

My first experience seeing Yes live was on the Relayer tour in 1975 at the Pacific Coliseum. And You And I is spectacular  {#Bananajam}

 
I was at that concert also. It was my first concert ever, blew me away. Then I went out and bought my 76 Rickenbacker bass. Chris Squire was a huge influence on me, RIP Chris.
 wgsu_1978 wrote:

I saw them in Buffalo on the same tour. A great show, but the audience was unfairly hard on Patrick Moraz, the new keyboard player.

Also, when Jon Anderson announced that the band would play a song from Tales From Topographic Oceans, someone yelled "SIDE TWO!!!" To which Anderson replied, "uh, no, this is Side Three." 
 
Was that the tour they had fibreglass constructions on stage à la Spinal Tap?
Saw them at the Garden in the late 70s. After 3 encores the lights came on, but nobody would leave. They finally came back for a fourth encore! Best concert ever! Thanks to the audience for being so stubborn.
Music does not get better than this. No. No it does not.
5 years later punk hit the world like a comet and wiped away dinosaurs like Yes. We're lucky to have Bill as a curator who gets these relics out of the closet every now and then. Now please put this one back in and keep it there for at least another 3 years. 
Wow, what a stinker.
I think I broke my sub-woofer...  lol!  ;-)
NO!
Wonderful song.
 ShaunJ wrote:

My first experience seeing Yes live was on the Relayer tour in 1975 at the Pacific Coliseum. And You And I is spectacular  {#Bananajam}

 
I saw them in Buffalo on the same tour. A great show, but the audience was unfairly hard on Patrick Moraz, the new keyboard player.

Also, when Jon Anderson announced that the band would play a song from Tales From Topographic Oceans, someone yelled "SIDE TWO!!!" To which Anderson replied, "uh, no, this is Side Three." 
Sorry. I got to post twice. 

The BASS! The BASS!

RIP Chris Squire. May we all be a fish out of water from time to time.
Oh my gosh. The trippy sound. The harmonics. The melodics. No strong back beat but a KILLER BASS.

Hooks are everywhere in this song...and it's a long freakin song!  And you can sing along with it as well as play air guitar as well as do a trippy kind of dance to it.

Who does this in 2015? Who even attempts this; let alone do it soooo freakin well.

 
ahhhhhhhhhhhh, yes...thanks for the psd button {#Cheesygrin} A trip back to the 70s
goosebumps {#Heartkiss}
 Kaw wrote:
Noooo! I missed it by a minute!
But great song. One of my favourites from Yes.

 
And I made it this time!
Great song!
RIP Chris Squire....You were a Roundabout....Bassalicious!
 
 westslope wrote:

Yes it is.  I suspect a strong influence on Steven Wilson's writing too.

 
My first experience seeing Yes live was on the Relayer tour in 1975 at the Pacific Coliseum. And You And I is spectacular  {#Bananajam}
Wow, this takes one back more than a few years to the days of windowpane. 
 idiot_wind wrote:
Chris Squire's bass playing is super fantastic.  

 
Yes it is.  I suspect a strong influence on Steven Wilson's writing too.
pure prose
lyrical
visual
thank you
and You and I .... thank you
an eleven in my book 
Noooo! I missed it by a minute!
But great song. One of my favourites from Yes.
This song aged remarkably well. Formidable band. Powerful album. Not my favorite for whistling, though.


this was my PDS for some screeching eastern female... not much better, there are other, better, more pleasing keys in which to sing{#Razz}
Gatefolds, wonderful artwork, interesting and uplifting songs.

Not for everyone but I love it. 
Ugh.
1972 wow!  Just starting high school, getting ready to go on an 8 year run of good times, with limited responsibilities.  And a Yes concert at the Mississippi River Festival.  How time flies.....
Where is peter Gabriel to sing on the eclipse part 
Any thoughts on Steven Wilson's remixing of early Yes albums?

Interesting ratings distribution. Usually it's some kind of bell curve. This seems to be a love it or hate it distribution. 
My favorite Yes song.  Reason: a classic stoner's crescendo. I used to crank it on the basement stereo, drove my Dad nuts. Even without the dope the track was (and maybe remains) a sonic odyssey par excellence. 
Double 10
Driving through the eastern NC bean and tobacco fields at 3 a.m., headed to Hatteras to surf. A cooler of food and beers, a baggie and papers, and Yes blasting out the windows.
 hayduke2 wrote:

Super sounds from the bong hit days

 
People are still hitting bongs as much as in the 70's. Yes was excellent though.
 expertTexpert wrote:
 All hail this version of Yes, the best prog rock band ever.

 
Utterly EPIC.
 daveesh wrote:
good god.

 
indeed.
this band and I never found common ground. I can admire them from afar for technical marvelry. Like Mark Twain said of Wagner, their music is probably better than it sounds...