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Pink Floyd — On The Turning Away
Album: Momentary Lapse Of Reason
Avg rating:
8.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1590









Released: 1987
Length: 5:30
Plays (last 30 days): 1
On the turning away
From the pale and downtrodden
And the words they say which we won't understand
''"Don't accept that what's happening
Is just a case of others' suffering
Or you'll find that you're joining in
The turning away"''

It's a sin that somehow
Light is changing to shadow
And casting its shroud over all we have known
Unaware how the ranks have grown
Driven on by a heart of stone
We could find that we're all alone
In the dream of the proud

On the wings of the night
As the daytime is stirring
Where the speechless unite in a silent accord
Using words you will find are strange
Mesmerised as they light the flame
Feel the new wind of change
On the wings of the night

No more turning away
From the weak and the weary
No more turning away from the coldness inside
Just a world that we all must share
It's not enough just to stand and stare
Is it only a dream that there'll be
No more turning away?
Comments (178)add comment
The older I am the more I appreciate PF. Is this a sign of getting old or getting better musically? :-/
Points for relevance, RP.
Long Live  RP
7 -> 8 - Most Excellent
As good as it gets.......Pink Floyd at its peak IMO
Awesome and then some. Thunder and grace, and about 20 minutes too short. 
Without doubt PF with Waters was the best combination, except IMHO the Last Cut, which may as well have been called a Waters solo album.

I know many enjoy solo Waters, sadly I am not one of them.

Gilmour is a genius in my book. He doesn't play especially fast or flashy, he is not a shredder, but his ability to communicate emotion through the guitar is unsurpassed, for me only equaled by Knopfler at his best.

Gilmour led a post Waters PF and produced some very decent work, of which this is an example.

I was fortunate enough to see them at Earls Court London on the Division Bell Tour.

Given that won't ever happen again, check out these guys who do a very fine job: https://youtu.be/c3rZbsLIfSQ
Definitely one of the best post-Waters tunes.
 alexmwalker wrote:
I've adored Pink Floyd since my early teens, but I don't need to hear this one again. Preachy, by-the-numbers schmaltz. If Mike and the Mechanics were asked to write a Jingle for Alliance insurance, it would sound like this.

 
sums it up pretty nicely
Used to listen to this CD many a time while taking a nap on the couch when it was first released.
A very prescient song, given what is happening in the world today.
 alexmwalker wrote:
I've adored Pink Floyd since my early teens, but I don't need to hear this one again. Preachy, by-the-numbers schmaltz. If Mike and the Mechanics were asked to write a Jingle for Alliance insurance, it would sound like this.

 
Its not quite that bad but definitely not one of the best tracks on the album. 
 ddbz wrote:
Pink Floyd without Roger? Yuck...Paul and Ringo might as well get back together and call themselves the Beatles.

 
I've always referred to this as "dry Floyd" - without Waters.  Not that I don't like it, though it does highlight how fucking awesome Gilmour is at playing guitars.  Long Live PF and RP!!

 
Emma Lazarus said, "Give me you tired, your poor". Yeah. We can blame them for everything.     
 Gilmour showcasing his awesomeness.. {#Cheers}
On the suny side there are peaceful sleepers in another time zone. Anyways it was a catalyst in my case.
 CHuLoYo wrote:
 fredriley wrote:
This is a very apposite song now, with a refugee crisis afflicting Europe, which instead of accepting with sympathy, solidarity and compassion the 00s of 000s of refugees from war-torn countries, is building walls and razor wire fences to keep out the ragged, desperate masses. "No more turning away" - if only :(

 
Yes , this happens because the American spirit that is invading Europe right now. Muslims = Terrorists (I don't think that barbarity). So the 99% of refugees are muslims, for Europe is a dangerous invasion. For people with a brain inside the head this is a fucking barbarity, a crime, an uncompassion method. The history is full of refugees with protection. When we are more advanced than never, right now, the behaviour of the goverments are the opposite of the people opinion. Go out, Europe gobernators! Go to hell fucking idiots! 

 
Unfortunately, this sentiment is not unique to America, nor was it the only place that was happening before the Syrian refugee crisis.  I agree that it is a horrible trend, but don't blame America alone on this one.
I'm thrilled to announce that Mr. Gilmour has decided to give every last quid of his earnings to the homeless!!!
A Momentary Lapse Of Income
 fredriley wrote:
This is a very apposite song now, with a refugee crisis afflicting Europe, which instead of accepting with sympathy, solidarity and compassion the 00s of 000s of refugees from war-torn countries, is building walls and razor wire fences to keep out the ragged, desperate masses. "No more turning away" - if only :(

 
Yes , this happens because the American spirit that is invading Europe right now. Muslims = Terrorists (I don't think that barbarity). So the 99% of refugees are muslims, for Europe is a dangerous invasion. For people with a brain inside the head this is a fucking barbarity, a crime, an uncompassion method. The history is full of refugees with protection. When we are more advanced than never, right now, the behaviour of the goverments are the opposite of the people opinion. Go out, Europe gobernators! Go to hell fucking idiots! 


Pink Floyd without Roger? Yuck...Paul and Ringo might as well get back together and call themselves the Beatles.
Gilmour is on fire in this solo
 KAREN_SILLERY wrote:

What album is this off of?



 
As per the album cover: A Momentary Lapse of Reason {#Biggrin}

What album is this off of?


 alexmwalker wrote:
I've adored Pink Floyd since my early teens, but I don't need to hear this one again. Preachy, by-the-numbers schmaltz. If Mike and the Mechanics were asked to write a Jingle for Alliance insurance, it would sound like this.

 
{#Lol}

The sentiment might be worthy, but the music doesn't do much for me. A shadow of former greatness.
This is a very apposite song now, with a refugee crisis afflicting Europe, which instead of accepting with sympathy, solidarity and compassion the 00s of 000s of refugees from war-torn countries, is building walls and razor wire fences to keep out the ragged, desperate masses. "No more turning away" - if only :(
First listen to Pink Floyd in my '57 Ford Coup on a 4/8 track tape player a loong time ago.  This song resonates well with me.
I've adored Pink Floyd since my early teens, but I don't need to hear this one again. Preachy, by-the-numbers schmaltz. If Mike and the Mechanics were asked to write a Jingle for Alliance insurance, it would sound like this.
 Tony0600 wrote:
I agree.  I think Pink Floyd have constantly tried to exploit the guitar sound on tracks like Time and Money on their later albums.  I tend not to listen to much after The Wall....
 
Yes, I stopped buying their albums following release of "Animals". They became too commercial for my taste.
The very good lyrics would have benefited from a more more restrained approach.  No need for the long guitar solo outro, or the overdone mid-section.
Less would have been more here, imo, bcs it has the nut of a very fine song.
can someone say bombastic? a rock solid 3
 gregormiz wrote:
One more rehash of a sound that got old after Dark Side of the Moon.
Yes, "Comfortably Numb" has legs, this one doesn't. MTV trash at its worst.
Oh GOD...  the guitar solo...  kill me now. 

 
I agree.  I think Pink Floyd have constantly tried to exploit the guitar sound on tracks like Time and Money on their later albums.  I tend not to listen to much after The Wall....
I grew up listening to Pink Floyd - first band I ever saw in 1974 - Dark Side of The Moon time. I don't think this rates as good as The Wall and stuff before it.   
Not really Pink Floyd without Waters or Wright.
There are really, really amazing comments in this thread, wow.

Among a lot of other things, they helped me understand what happened to my relationship with PF just before this album came out.

I started listening to PF thanks to my older brother when I was 12 (1978.) I have incredibly strong feelings and memories associated to all their albums until 'The Wall' included.
I was swimming in their music, breathing through it.

After The Wall, I just was... fed. In the best sense of the word. I didn't need more PF, wasn't in synch with them anymore, and I consider Water's departure as being only one of the numerous reasons I disconnected with them.
It just so happens that, just when he left the band, I moved on to other music, bands, arts.

I'm actually really glad to hear so many people having positive things to say about this tune and this album. It comforts me to know that even with Waters gone, people kept having great experiences listening to PF.

And when Gilmour plays a guitar solo, the world's a MUCH better place to me. 40 years ago just as well as today.
{#Daisy}{#Daisy}{#Daisy} Sweeeeeeeeet{#Daisy}{#Daisy}{#Daisy}
 Lazarus wrote:

No more turning the FBI away...

Judge orders Google to comply with FBI's secret NSL demands

A federal judge tells the company to comply with the FBI's warrantless National Security Letter requests for user details, despite ongoing concerns about their constitutionality...
 



 
These lyrics have nothing to do with political issues of command and control.  Rather, they are about our en masse personal failures to care.for the lost and broken.
Everybody in my homeless camp loves this song...
like from on high....teach me
 kingart wrote:
The passion of this is on a really high plane. That guitar is almost overwhelming. So not the first time I cry on hearing it. One problem: it's about 20 minutes too short. 

 
Kind of what I said. 
Beautiful transition from Life on Mars...Bowie. The art of an instrumental within a 4 minute song is an art of a lost and forgotten world. The guitar solo is a an expression that rarely gets explored anymore. Such a sad thing! Luckily David Gilmour provides nearly every time, which always evokes emotion from me.
Pink Floyd barbification
Nice during running: when that solo starts you can run twice as fast
 TwinEngine wrote:
I think this is my favorite Pink Floyd song, and I'm not really a fan (in proportion to HOW POPULAR they are). They are musically interesting, but I always had difficulty getting over the sledgehammer rhetoric in their most popular songs: "mother this" and "money that" and "bricks in the wall". Perhaps because this one has an earnest as opposed to a skeptical viewpoint, and "on the turning away" is subtler, it works for me.
 
The summary of your comment is that you don't like Roger Waters.
 gregormiz wrote:
One more rehash of a sound that got old after Dark Side of the Moon.
Yes, "Comfortably Numb" has legs, this one doesn't. MTV trash at its worst.
Oh GOD...  the guitar solo...  kill me now. 
 
I hope you go to a heaven without Gilmour guitar solo's, and I hope when I do, I will not go there too.
 ziakut wrote:
Unwittingly have to say I enjoy this song. It's not my favorite PF tune, but it does have a majestic cadence to it. It brings back memories to me...grand or small. Like a slide show that replays with perfect transitions. I personally miss the essence of a guitar solo in a rock song. Something that is truly missing in today's music. It allowed another expression of the song. The lyric has its say...then the music. Sometimes when the solo mimicked the melody a bit...it always provided a thrill to me. David Gilmour was a master at this!
 
Absolutely. Fortunately there are still bands that do a very satisfying solo now and then... Porcupine Tree always comes to mind.
Better than their old stuff.
The passion of this is on a really high plane. That guitar is almost overwhelming. So not the first time I cry on hearing it. One problem: it's about 20 minutes too short. 
This gets a 10.  Live version gets a 12.
Unwittingly have to say I enjoy this song. It's not my favorite PF tune, but it does have a majestic cadence to it. It brings back memories to me...grand or small. Like a slide show that replays with perfect transitions. I personally miss the essence of a guitar solo in a rock song. Something that is truly missing in today's music. It allowed another expression of the song. The lyric has its say...then the music. Sometimes when the solo mimicked the melody a bit...it always provided a thrill to me. David Gilmour was a master at this!
 Hodgie wrote:
People who listen to RP have a greater appreciation for music than your average citizen.

Many of us have very strong associations and memories with specific songs that get played on RP.

On The Turning Away.

It's January of 1988 and my father passes away. I fly down to the Florida Panhandle from UMass. In the days preceding and post his funeral, I spend a lot of time in cars, driving from place to place. Everywhere I go, I hear this song. Even at two separate taverns, this song finds me. Must have heard it 8 times in 5 days.

My father was a very flawed man with a huge heart and a wonderful sense of humor. I admittingly don't think that much about him any more, 22 years after his passing. When this song plays however, it feels like I lost him yesterday.

Could not live without music.....

 
This is beautiful, eloquent stuff. You have captured the essence of what music means, and reading this with "On the Turning Away" as its soundtrack makes it that much more meaningful. Thanks for writing this - your father would be proud. 

 martinc wrote:
I just love screaming guitar songs
 
Yep, that will do.

I can't believe I never rated this one.  10.

A great album, start to finish.
Top#3 PF...
As a respite from the overblown egocentric Waters, this is a little treat.

 
mandolin wrote:

...i think this is the weakest song from momentary lapse of reason, which as an album i quite like...it's telling that i find RPWL's masters of war cover to be a far stronger song than this original which clearly inspired it; perhaps gilmour and mason should have recruited bob dylan to fill roger waters' shoes...

...i think roger waters' solo work is an outstanding high-water mark of music-as-art, and certainly he didn't hesitate to bring in some of the very best to fill his former bandmates' shoes, including eric clapton, michael kamen, andy brown, and jeff beck among a host of guests, but music-as-art doesn't neccessarily function well as sonic decor, which is where gilmour's new-floyd clearly outpaced roger waters in popular reception...

...which resonates more strongly?..it depends entirely upon which creative vision one embraces, but while i find both efforts eminently savory in their respective contexts, roger waters' augmented albums still achieve a masterwork status which new-floyd's unaugmented outings don't quite attain, timeless though both may be...
 


 Relayer wrote:
In 1987, Waters was only recurring songs that were fevered rants about everything. Far from his talents in the 70s. Here we have Gilmour doing a great song; incredible music, good lyrics, and it resonates more than the 80s Waters stuff. Love Gilmour.
 
...i think this is the weakest song from momentary lapse of reason, which as an album i quite like...it's telling that i find RPWL's masters of war cover to be a far stronger song than this original which clearly inspired it; perhaps gilmour and mason should have recruited bob dylan to fill roger waters' shoes...

...i think roger waters' solo work is an outstanding high-water mark of music-as-art, and certainly he didn't hesitate to bring in some of the very best to fill his former bandmates' shoes, including eric clapton, michael kamen, andy brown, and jeff beck among a host of guests, but music-as-art doesn't neccessarily function well as sonic decor, which is where gilmour's new-floyd clearly outpaced roger waters in popular reception...

...which resonates more strongly?..it depends entirely upon which creative vision one embraces, but while i find both efforts eminently savory in their respective contexts, roger waters' augmented albums still achieve a masterwork status which new-floyd's unaugmented outings don't quite attain, timeless though both may be...
Got a portable cd player from my parents for a birthday present when i was a kid. First cd player I ever had. The next present was a disc... Dark Side of the Moon. Little did I know how important that present would be in my influencing my musical taste.
First concert I ever went to was the tour that supported this album. Blew me away! 
I just love screaming guitar songs
*SIGH*
i can't even think of anything witty to say that encapsulates my blah for this album.
 scrubbrush wrote:
Gilmour is just about my favorite guitarist.

Waters is by FAR my favorite lyricist.

Although i don't consider this 'real' Pink Floyd, it's a great song

 

I like your comment about it being 'real' Floyd and am agreed. Although you can definitely pick out Animals and Wall in the song. Personally I liked his(Gilmore) solo stuff especially 'About Face' and songs like 'Murder'(thats one killer tune if you're a guitar nut).

In 1987, Waters was only recurring songs that were fevered rants about everything. Far from his talents in the 70s. Here we have Gilmour doing a great song; incredible music, good lyrics, and it resonates more than the 80s Waters stuff. Love Gilmour.
Gilmour is just about my favorite guitarist.

Waters is by FAR my favorite lyricist.

Although i don't consider this 'real' Pink Floyd, it's a great song

 brandue wrote:

 

This is Gilmore at his best.


 
{#Whisper}  It's "Gilmour"


Of all the incredible Pink Floyd songs, this one?  Arrrgghh
One more rehash of a sound that got old after Dark Side of the Moon.
Yes, "Comfortably Numb" has legs, this one doesn't. MTV trash at its worst.
Oh GOD...  the guitar solo...  kill me now. 
 ch83575 wrote:

Lyrics and vocals lack emotion without Waters.  Music lacks depth without Wright.  The whole is no longer more than just the sum of its parts... as a matter of fact it might be less.  At least David can still play that axe. 

 

I couldn't agree less with this...The voice was as good as ever; Yet Another Movie could and should have been a classic by itself, and needs some play here, by the way!!! Depth, to me actually defines this LP.....Everybody loves PF as they were, but THIS PF was excellent all on it's own!!!

 

This is Gilmore at his best.


Oh heavenly bliss!! Food for my ears...One of the better songs from this album!!
 Hodgie wrote:
People who listen to RP have a greater appreciation for music than your average citizen.

Could not live without music.....

 
Well put.
And I agree fully.

People who listen to RP have a greater appreciation for music than your average citizen.

Many of us have very strong associations and memories with specific songs that get played on RP.

On The Turning Away.

It's January of 1988 and my father passes away. I fly down to the Florida Panhandle from UMass. In the days preceding and post his funeral, I spend a lot of time in cars, driving from place to place. Everywhere I go, I hear this song. Even at two separate taverns, this song finds me. Must have heard it 8 times in 5 days.

My father was a very flawed man with a huge heart and a wonderful sense of humor. I admittingly don't think that much about him any more, 22 years after his passing. When this song plays however, it feels like I lost him yesterday.

Could not live without music.....

My favourite track too, especially the epic live version, dunno of which concert but the version that's been officially released on CD...
As far as Pink Floyd, i think they're great but after a few listens they lose my attention, it's really nice and all but i miss the spark... I once made a personal "Best Of" CD of all the Pink Floyd albums but that one almost never touches the CD player... {#Stupid}
This one:

9
I think this is my favorite Pink Floyd song, and I'm not really a fan (in proportion to HOW POPULAR they are). They are musically interesting, but I always had difficulty getting over the sledgehammer rhetoric in their most popular songs: "mother this" and "money that" and "bricks in the wall". Perhaps because this one has an earnest as opposed to a skeptical viewpoint, and "on the turning away" is subtler, it works for me.


# 10.
Really enjoy this era of PF. If memory serves, Gary Moore helped out rather nicely on the a;bum.

Thanks BG!
 ch83575 wrote:

Lyrics and vocals lack emotion without Waters.  Music lacks depth without Wright.  The whole is no longer more than just the sum of its parts... as a matter of fact it might be less.  At least David can still play that axe. 

 

{#Yes}
Though nowhere near approaching their epic early to mid 70's albums; this is a pretty good song.
epic
{#Bananajam}I remember helping a friend write a speech using this song as the symbolic basis when I was in Middle School.  I think of him whenever I hear it.  Nick, I hope you are doing fine. 
By their own admission, the members of PF were no virtuosos.  Still, it all worked for me, and very well.
Was living and breathing Pink Floyd during it's time - composition = 8, complexity = 7, execution = 10
DoctorHooey
(/etc)
Posted: Feb 25, 2008 - 13:16 < Reply >

daveturnley wrote: I never understood why Gilmour tried to imitate Waters with the big themes and serious subject matter. I think he had some 'help' during the creation of this album from folks who guided him in the direction of what Floyd supposedly 'really' was.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

DG would be the first to tell you that he is no lyricist and leaves this duty for others.
Marr
(Houston (dreaming of Austin))
Posted: Feb 25, 2008 - 13:15 < Reply >

junebaby65 wrote: Beautiful voice and great guitar solo.

I'm glad to hear someone else commenting on his voice. The guitar is certainly excellent, but I always thought his voice to be one of the best of his generation. It has some quality to it that just works so well with the guitar.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Yes, indeedy!

And now....back to your regularly scheduled program ==>  Pink Floyd - On The Turning Away

David Bowie - Life on Mars?
Coldplay - Lost?
 TexasAggies wrote:

I think he means that this album was the least "Pink Floyd" of any of theirs. This album was basically David Gilmour solo with a bunch of co-writers. Nick and Rick were not really involved until late in the process and the ensuing tour, nor did they help write any of the songs. Tony Levin was among the session musicians that appear on this disc, also Carmen Appice.
 
Lyrics and vocals lack emotion without Waters.  Music lacks depth without Wright.  The whole is no longer more than just the sum of its parts... as a matter of fact it might be less.  At least David can still play that axe. 

 Ericac wrote:
Another work stopper, up goes the volume. The guitar solo soars.
 


 lophrequa wrote:

i love cock-rock {#Bounce}
 

So you are a big fan of the Beastie Boys first album then?{#Roflol}
 bugleboy624 wrote:
Yes, I'm the RP freak. I like songs and artists that everyone hates. I should probably just change my profile name to "RP Wierdo".
 

Well I must be a freak too because I looked at your rating list and I agree with most of it.
Love this song too.  I thought this album was excellent and very much in the Pink Floyd spirit of old.  Everyone has their favorite PF albums.  Mine happens to be "Animals".

Anyone else out there in Radio Paradise Land have some sort of strong tie to this song? Meaning, a VERY SPECIFIC memory attached that stops you in your tracks when this song plays? My guess is an affirmative because how this song plays.
{#Lol}  i love sarcasm. 

his voice in this song is beautiful, but i am a fan of older pink floyd.
 thewiseking wrote:
alas, what fresh hell is this?

reminds one of Richard Clayderman or Yanni.

stripped down Floyd. the bones are bared.
 

ncollingridge wrote:

Absolutely. This is just tedious, obvious, cock-rock, with no redeeming aspects.

i love cock-rock {#Bounce}


 twp wrote:
I'm a Floyd fan from way back, but I can't stand this record. I'll totally admit that Waters' navel-gazing and self-pitying routine got pretty old, but I still prefer it to this treacly, overproduced, trite nonsense. I actually had to turn off RP until this song was over, it gets on my nerves so much.

 
Absolutely. This is just tedious, obvious, cock-rock, with no redeeming aspects. How the might are fallen - that this could be the same band responsible for the sensitivity and soul of Dark Side of the Moon is almost impossible to believe. The band should be ashamed that they released this track under the name of the band, demeaning its great heritage.
This song just has terrific lyrics:

On the turning away
From the pale and downtrodden
And the words they say
Which we won't understand
"Don't accept that what's happening
Is just a case of others' suffering
Or you'll find that you're joining in
The turning away ...
It's a sin that somehow
Light is changing to shadow
And casting it's shroud
Over all we have known

Unaware how the ranks have grown
Driven on by a heart of stone
We could find that we're all alone
In the dream of the proud
On the wings of the night
As the daytime is stirring
Where the speechless unite
In a silent accord
Using words you will find are strange
And mesmerised as they light the flame
Feel the new wind of change
On the wings of the night
No more turning away
From the weak and the weary
No more turning away
From the coldness inside
Just a world that we all must share
It's not enough just to stand and stare
Is it only a dream that there'll be
No more turning away?

To me it says one shouldn't turn their heart to stone, that good can and must prevail, and it is our duty to reach out and make it happen and not turn away.


I'm a Floyd fan from way back, but I can't stand this record. I'll totally admit that Waters' navel-gazing and self-pitying routine got pretty old, but I still prefer it to this treacly, overproduced, trite nonsense. I actually had to turn off RP until this song was over, it gets on my nerves so much.
Yes, I'm the RP freak. I like songs and artists that everyone hates. I should probably just change my profile name to "RP Wierdo".
thewiseking wrote:
alas, what fresh hell is this. reminds one of Richard Clyderman or Yanni. stripped down Floyd. the bones are bared.
Go wash your hands! You can not type Floyd and that that god awful y creature in the same post.
alph wrote:
Calling this "Pink Floyd" is a bit of a stretch.
I don't know about that. Considering how much (though not all) of the "voice" of mid-to-late Pink Floyd was based around Gilmour's voice and Gilmour's guitar playing, I think this still sounds pretty much like PF.
Favorite band. Favorite song.
alas, what fresh hell is this? reminds one of Richard Clayderman or Yanni. stripped down Floyd. the bones are bared.
David Bowie - Life on Mars? :arrow: Pink Floyd - On The Turning Away :music:
...i love this album, but this song is really really weak, too contrived and cliche and just kind of flat to hold its own against the balance... ...bear in mind the context of my criticism, though; i still give it a 'pretty good'... :lol:
supremo wrote:
What?! I think this is some of their best work!!!
I think he means that this album was the least "Pink Floyd" of any of theirs. This album was basically David Gilmour solo with a bunch of co-writers. Nick and Rick were not really involved until late in the process and the ensuing tour, nor did they help write any of the songs. Tony Levin was among the session musicians that appear on this disc, also Carmen Appice.
alph wrote:
Calling this "Pink Floyd" is a bit of a stretch.
What?! I think this is some of their best work!!!
Another work stopper, up goes the volume. The guitar solo soars.
Calling this "Pink Floyd" is a bit of a stretch.
Hannio wrote:
Anyone else think his guitar is tuned a little flat in this?
i'm not sure, how do you tune your guitar when recording in the studio?
If I ever go deaf, this is the final moment I want to hear. It always carries me and lifts me up to an inner peace for a while. I saw David play this in Phoenix Arizona in an open air stadium, under the stars. The most magical musical moment in my life.
daveturnley wrote:
I never understood why Gilmour tried to imitate Waters with the big themes and serious subject matter.
I think he had some 'help' during the creation of this album from folks who guided him in the direction of what Floyd supposedly 'really' was. This is the reason this album never really hit home for me, despite a few good songs - it felt too much like it was trying at being Floyd while really being something else.
junebaby65 wrote:
Beautiful voice and great guitar solo.
I'm glad to hear someone else commenting on his voice. The guitar is certainly excellent, but I always thought his voice to be one of the best of his generation. It has some quality to it that just works so well with the guitar.
I never understood why Gilmour tried to imitate Waters with the big themes and serious subject matter.
Pink Floyd rules! Thanks, Bill.
Hannio wrote:
Anyone else think his guitar is tuned a little flat in this?
A bit, yes, but it works somehow.
Majestic guitar solo.
I've always been on Waters' side... and I'm so childish I've never heard this record in my whole life. Lately I'm beginning to think I was a bit too strict. :ask:
Alpine wrote:
I have always loved Pink Floyd. I have never really followed them closely. What is this "Post Waters" stuff all about?
Waters left Pink Floyd after The Final Cut, which cam out in 1983. Although there really wasn't Floyd at that time anyway. Richard Wright left after The Wall tour and didn't play on The Final Cut, and Nick Mason didn't have much to do with The Final Cut at all. Gilmour was still around, but he was having less and less to do with it. Waters had been assuming control of the band since 1977's Animals, although I would argue that neither The Wall nor The Final Cut would have been anywhere near as good as they are without his musical input. Just listen to Gilmour's guitar work on the latter's "The Fletcher Memorial Home" and "The Final Cut." Waters thought his leaving would mean the end of Pink Floyd -- he thought he was Pink Floyd -- but Gilmour kept at it, kept the band together, and, after much legal controversy and with much bitter acrimony, released A Momentary Lapse of Reason, from which this track comes. It's more or less a Gilmour solo album, but Mason and (less so) Wright contributed to it, as did many other of Gilmour's friends. The second post-Waters album, The Division Bell, is much more of a Floyd album, with Wright especially contributing a great deal to the songwriting. Some Floyd fans have taken sides, and I suppose I'm more on Gilmour's side, but one needn't do so. I saw both on their recent solo tours, both played the old Floyd, and both were amazing. One just longs for a more substantive reunion. The Live8 performance a couple of years ago in London was great, but it also provided a taste of what they could still do together.
What can you say that hasn't already been said about Mr Gilmour's guitar prowess ? 10
winter wrote:
Not wild about the song itself, but that solo...WOW. Gilmour's one of the greats. :notworthy:
+1 Wim06
20 year anniversary of this concert tour to the day in D.C. Has it really been that freaking long? :sunny: :yes: :propeller: :wink: :stupid: :daisy: :curtain:
I have always loved Pink Floyd. I have never really followed them closely. What is this "Post Waters" stuff all about?
danagraves wrote:
Solo so wonderful...
Not wild about the song itself, but that solo...WOW. Gilmour's one of the greats. :notworthy:
For my money, the best guitarist I've ever heard.
sfListener wrote:
I sit in anticipation of the guitar solo.
Solo so wonderful...
Anyone else think his guitar is tuned a little flat in this?