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Peter Gabriel — Biko
Album: Peter Gabriel 3: Melt
Avg rating:
8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1579









Released: 1980
Length: 7:25
Plays (last 30 days): 1
September '77
Port Elizabeth weather fine
It was business as usual
In police room 619
Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Yihla Moja, Yihla Moja
- The man is dead

When I try to sleep at night
I can only dream in red
The outside world is black and white
With only one colour dead

Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Yihla Moja, Yihla Moja
- The man is dead

You can blow out a candle
But you can't blow out a fire
Once the flames begin to catch
The wind will blow it higher

Oh Biko, Biko, because Biko
Yihla Moja, Yihla Moja
- The man is dead

And the eyes of the world are
Watching now
Watching now
Comments (394)add comment
Though I do like this tune very much. It feels a bit too drawn out. Sometimes less is more.
 fuzzy_logic wrote:
The Youtube for this song during the 1986 Amnesty International Conspiracy of Hope Tour is possibly the single best song performance I've seen. It's powerful.

 
Giants Stadium, New Jersey. I was there! Yes, it was an amazing performance. 

How many more Bikos are in the world now in North Korea, Syria, Iraq, Iran, ISIS territory etc?
The Youtube for this song during the 1986 Amnesty International Conspiracy of Hope Tour is possibly the single best song performance I've seen. It's powerful.
Years ago, I saw this amazing man in concert. He ended the show with this. So, it will forever be in a special place in my heart!
 On_The_Beach wrote:
From a strictly musical standpoint, this never did much for me.
A slow, plodding dirge.
Given the somber (& importatnt) subject of the song, I suppose it is appropriate.

 
 raenvald wrote:
More than appropriate. Impressive restraint, power and gravitas in this "plodding dirge".

What version is it tho? Not the one from the indicated album, Peter Gabriel 3/Melt. Seems longer and richer than I recall ...
  

Given that a dirge, by definition, is "a lament for the dead", I guess it is appropriate.  This sounds like the original version from that album to me, at least it sounds like the version on the CD I bought back in 1980.
 h8rhater wrote:

Very appropriate.  Especially for a given time and place. 

If you were fortunate enough to see it performed during the Apartheid era, it had a special significance.  When I saw him perform it at the Amnesty International Human Rights Now concert in Philadelphia in 1988, Nelson Mandela was still serving time in a South African jail.  To hear nearly 100,000 people sing out the coda from this number into the Philadelphia night was spine tingling. 



 
I flew to LA to see that tour at the LA Coliseum. Powerful performance!
 raenvald wrote:
More than appropriate. Impressive restraint, power and gravitas in this "plodding dirge".

What version is it tho? Not the one from the indicated album, Peter Gabriel 3/Melt. Seems longer and richer than I recall ...
 
On_The_Beach wrote:
From a strictly musical standpoint, this never did much for me.
A slow, plodding dirge.
Given the somber (& importatnt) subject of the song, I suppose it is appropriate.

 

 
Again, is this truly the album version? Sounds great. Still moving.


I remember hearing this for the first time ever When PG performed it on the Conspiracy of Hope tour way back in 1986.  30 years ago!

My whole goal for that Sunday was just to watch the concert on MTV and make sure that I had enough cassette tapes to record all the music that I cared about.  I didn't even own a VCR to record the actual program, so I spent pretty much the whole day sitting in the living room with my girlfriend watching the concert and flipping cassette tapes to record the simulcast.

Man!  30 Years!  It's great to think about how much free time you have on your hands when you are young and don't have all those adult responsibilities.
 h8rhater wrote:

Very appropriate.  Especially for a given time and place. 

If you were fortunate enough to see it performed during the Apartheid era, it had a special significance.  When I saw him perform it at the Amnesty International Human Rights Now concert in Philadelphia in 1988, Nelson Mandela was still serving time in a South African jail.  To hear nearly 100,000 people sing out the coda from this number into the Philadelphia night was spine tingling. 



 
Saw him in that era as well. Still the best concert I ever saw... and I've seen a lot.
Great song to get drunk to
 On_The_Beach wrote:
From a strictly musical standpoint, this never did much for me.
A slow, plodding dirge.
Given the somber (& importatnt) subject of the song, I suppose it is appropriate.

 
Very appropriate.  Especially for a given time and place. 

If you were fortunate enough to see it performed during the Apartheid era, it had a special significance.  When I saw him perform it at the Amnesty International Human Rights Now concert in Philadelphia in 1988, Nelson Mandela was still serving time in a South African jail.  To hear nearly 100,000 people sing out the coda from this number into the Philadelphia night was spine tingling. 









You can blow out a candle
But you can't blow out a fire

More than appropriate. Impressive restraint, power and gravitas in this "plodding dirge".

What version is it tho? Not the one from the indicated album, Peter Gabriel 3/Melt. Seems longer and richer than I recall ...
 
On_The_Beach wrote:
From a strictly musical standpoint, this never did much for me.
A slow, plodding dirge.
Given the somber (& importatnt) subject of the song, I suppose it is appropriate.

 


From a strictly musical standpoint, this never did much for me.
A slow, plodding dirge.
Given the somber (& important) subject of the song, I suppose it is appropriate.
big stud romeotuma wrote:
Stephen Bantu Biko (18 December 1946 - 12 September 1977) was a noted anti-apartheid activist in South Africa in the 1960s and early 1970s...  on 18 August 1977, Biko was arrested at a police roadblock under the Terrorism Act No 83 of 1967... he suffered a major head injury while in police custody, and was chained to a window grille for a day... on 11 September 1977 police loaded him in the back of a Land Rover, naked, and began the 1,500 km drive to Pretoria to take him to a prison with hospital facilities in order to treat the already near-dead Biko... he died shortly after arrival at the Pretoria prison, on 12 September...
 
Peter Gabriel sang in 1980,

"And the eyes of the world are watching now..."

this is an incredibly powerful song that helped change the world for the better... this song still possesses contemporary relevance as demonstrated by an article a few days ago—

The Secret Government Rulebook For Labeling You a Terrorist
By Jeremy Scahill and Ryan Devereaux
23 Jul 2014, 2:45 PM EDT

The Obama administration has quietly approved a substantial expansion of the terrorist watchlist system, authorizing a secret process that requires neither “concrete facts” nor “irrefutable evidence” to designate an American or foreigner as a terrorist, according to a key government document obtained by The Intercept...


I miss this Gabe.

I saw him on the tour for the 4th album. Wireless mic (one of the first) and jumping around for Shock the Monkey - until the very end.
He stood rock still and did this. His immobility, out of respect, made it all the more moving. 
A godlike song.  Made even better coming after Rebecca Zapen.  It could work the other way around, too.  You're making for a great Friday afternoon, Bill!
 richlister wrote:
I can feel it... Callin' in the air... Oh, wait...

 
Yes, wait. Gabriel's album preceded his former drummer's album which contained that (god-awful) tune.
I can feel it... Callin' in the air... Oh, wait...
Not a Peter Gabriel fan.  But love this song.
 
 westslope wrote:

Biko will play a role in the upcoming US presidential election.

 

Fact.



 
{#Lol}   

Did your prediction pan out?   Don't tell me you are into facts now, Westslope.   That would be quite a personal evolution.

 {#Wink}
I would read my parents Newsweek back then, and remember South Africa as a volatile place, far away but much like the stirring violence on our city streets; and I read about Steve Biko being beaten to death in jail ... I was a kid getting shaken wide awake

Peter Gabriel's song is to this day a beautiful shout!
Thank you Peter for writing this song and making a generation know about this murder!
Going to see Peter in concert Sept. 30. Can't wait!!
Reminds me of this amazing day back in 1990.


Everybody in my mushrooming multitude of churches loves this song...  as good as it gets...
 
 Shesdifferent wrote:
There isn't a moment when I turn on RP and Peter Gabriel is playing! Ugh! Bleech!
 
I presume you meant not playing? {#No} or else you only like PG!
Great song, but should be played sparingly, and at the appropriate time (whatever that means, ha). 
 xkolibuul wrote:
PG has made a lot of wonderful music since Biko, but it is still his masterpiece.  
 

I think you may be right. I've not heard this for way too long. I really must find my PG albums and give them a listen or two!
Once again, RP reminds me of records I used to love.
PG has made a lot of wonderful music since Biko, but it is still his masterpiece.  
such a Powerful piece, also a lasting call for attention to the history of Apartheid; and yes, the lingering history of thickheaded racists
 Shesdifferent wrote:
There isn't a moment when I turn on RP and Peter Gabriel is playing! Ugh! Bleech!
 
Then listen to a different station. It's a free world. And this song is fantastic :-)

Biko will play a role in the upcoming US presidential election.

 

Fact.


{#Notworthy} Biko will live for ever in our hearts!
This is a great song.  Great message.  It reminds me of bagepipes playing.   Not played enough.  


Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...

 
 imklammer wrote:
This version is good but the version by Manu Dibango on "Waka Africa" just blows it away.
 
Of this I have no doubt, I will have to check it out!{#Cheers}
 imklammer wrote:
This version is good but the version by Manu Dibango on "Waka Africa" just blows it away.
 
Is there a link to it? I've never heard of it before... This version guts me enough, with the song of rejoicing at the beginning, and the dirge at the end. I cry every time, because every time, it brings home the point that humans are selfish, stupid, and greedy, and if they cared even one whit about their fellow man, they'd never take a life.

"Port Elizabeth
Weather Fine ..."
There are VERY few songs where the first words kind of burned themselves into my mind.

And although I do think that the possibility of really changing something through music is a thing that is very rare, i do think that "BIKO"  DID something: I remember a lot of people where so emotionally grabbed by the song and the video thar they simply could not treat apartheid the way they did before ...

and how godlike is THIS:

THE EYES OF THE WORLD  ARE WATCHING NOW !

indeed, they were. and it was way before twitter/facebook and all those internet devices which now make the world SEE.
prophetic!
 sbegf wrote:

I think you would be hard pressed to find regular FM listener's who have ever heard of the PG song Biko, they would probably give a dear in the headlights look.  Oversaturation is a stretch (only played here once every few months).

 
This, Salisbury Hill, Games Without Frontiers and In Your Eyes while great songs were and probably still are clear channel classic rock staples in regular rotation all over the corporate nation at the same level as Bohemian Rhapsody, Mississippi Queen, Radar Love and other run into the ground regulars.{#Yes}

This version is good but the version by Manu Dibango on "Waka Africa" just blows it away.

 this song for me was the watershed moment where Peter transcended the rock singer/songwriter category into the true artist with a conscience category...this was not a marketing driven moment but a one of sober reflection and a focusing of the small spot light he could wield...


PG himself  is  musically and lyrically a 10, Thank God he went solo. Enjoy the Supremes Phil, that;s as far as your artistic taste can take you
tapatia1072 wrote:"This song always gives me chills. An outstanding homage indeed. Too bad that so many refused to confront the evils of apartheid and divest from South Africa - including the Reagan administration and a number of multinational corporations."
-
Was it all acceptable under Carter, Nixon, Johnson, Kennedy, etc.? Do you think they did not get Executive Briefings that gave them insight into what was going on in S.A.?

Anyway, great song.


 Shesdifferent wrote:
There isn't a moment when I turn on RP and Peter Gabriel is playing! Ugh! Bleech!
 
Peter Gabriel is somewhat of an RP cross-over artist (as is Bowie), who's mainstream enough to appeal to moderates in the various RP tribes but is unlikely to do anything but annoy the tribe fanboys.  Or maybe he's just overplayed, I donno.

 sirdroseph wrote:


You are already at one of them.
 
I think you would be hard pressed to find regular FM listener's who have ever heard of the PG song Biko, they would probably give a dear in the headlights look.  Oversaturation is a stretch (only played here once every few months).

 Shesdifferent wrote:
There isn't a moment when I turn on RP and Peter Gabriel is playing! Ugh! Bleech!
 

You are my hero!{#Notworthy}
 crockydile wrote:

Oversaturation Where? I want to find such a place.

 

You are already at one of them.
 romeotuma wrote:


Stephen Bantu Biko (18 December 1946 - 12 September 1977) was a noted anti-apartheid activist in South Africa in the 1960s and early 1970s...  on 18 August 1977, Biko was arrested at a police roadblock under the Terrorism Act No 83 of 1967... he suffered a major head injury while in police custody, and was chained to a window grille for a day... on 11 September 1977 police loaded him in the back of a Land Rover, naked, and began the 1,500 km drive to Pretoria to take him to a prison with hospital facilities in order to treat the already near-dead Biko... he died shortly after arrival at the Pretoria prison, on 12 September...
 
Yeah, this is a great song...

 

Tears streaming as I'm sitting here. Can't help it. Grabs me by the throat ...
 tapatia1072 wrote:
This song always gives me chills. An outstanding homage indeed. Too bad that so many refused to confront the evils of apartheid and divest from South Africa - including the Reagan administration and a number of multinational corporations.
 
https://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,959843,00.html

Yep, but better it happend later and not never at all by Reagan.

There isn't a moment when I turn on RP and Peter Gabriel is playing! Ugh! Bleech!
 sirdroseph wrote:
Great anthemic song, though beaten down by oversaturation a bit. This song would even be better if they had a better lead singer!{#Wink} Just ribbin you Gabrielphiles out there!{#Lol} Seriously though I tolerate Gabriel for the sake of the kids.
 
Oversaturation Where? I want to find such a place.

 steeler wrote:
If you are not simultaneously chilled and inspired by this, well . . .

Powerfully evocative.
 
{#Yes}

Great anthemic song, though beaten down by oversaturation a bit. This song would even be better if they had a better lead singer!{#Wink} Just ribbin you Gabrielphiles out there!{#Lol} Seriously though I tolerate Gabriel for the sake of the kids.
This song always gives me chills. An outstanding homage indeed. Too bad that so many refused to confront the evils of apartheid and divest from South Africa - including the Reagan administration and a number of multinational corporations.
If you are not simultaneously chilled and inspired by this, well . . .

Powerfully evocative.
Saw him perform this as the show closer in the mid-80s in Toronto (Exhibition Stadium). The drum machine continued for several minutes after he and the band left the stage. I was completely captured by that moment. Fond memories.
 Anax wrote:
Good song, great politics and all that, but there are so many other good songs to play on his 3rd solo album.
 
That whole album is very good.

 calypsus_1 wrote:

Peter Gabriel - "Biko" Live (1986):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLg-8Jxi5aE

"The final date of the 1986 Amnesty International Conspiracy of Hope Tour. This was the set closer, an emotional version of Biko. "


 
I wept through this video...  You can see Peter Gabriel's tears, too.  What a powerful statement.  If only we didn't need things like this to remind us to be HUMANE.

 romeotuma wrote:


How the world has changed since this magnificent song came out...  love it...


 
{#Yes}

"Plays Live" version is better.
My favorite of all favorites of Peter Gabriel.
What a tribute.
NOW THIS IS COOL PETER GABRIEL
Good song, great politics and all that, but there are so many other good songs to play on his 3rd solo album.


How the world has changed since this magnificent song came out...  love it...



Peter Gabriel - "Biko" Live (1986):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLg-8Jxi5aE

"The final date of the 1986 Amnesty International Conspiracy of Hope Tour. This was the set closer, an emotional version of Biko. "



GREAT song...


Phil Collins took this drum sound with him to "In The Air Tonight".
A marvelous recollection of man's inhumanity to his fellow man.
One of the most amazing concerts ever- October 1978 Lyric Theater Baltimore.....he emerged from the crowd....the theater was only three quarters full and blew us all away!
 Stingray wrote:
Johnny Clegg and the Cleggs?
Don't tell me this is Genesis!
Ireland meets SA - mediocre (to be nice)

 

Other than Steve & Johnny both being SA'can... what the hell has PG and this song got to do with Mr. Clegg? Certainly not the music!!!


This is a truly great song...  love it...


 kaybee wrote:
This song always moves me to tears.  I wonder how many Steven Biko's are in Gaza right now.
 
or iran. or in darfur. or the congo. or afghanistan.

omfg how did I give this a 3? Wow I must have been young and dumb, a solid 10!


cannot stress it enough....

TEN TEN TEN!!
{#Bounce}{#Bounce}{#Bounce}{#Bounce}
The movie Cry Freedom is a great biopic of Biko...it will make you cry...then get angry.
 Stingray wrote:
Johnny Clegg and the Cleggs?
Don't tell me this is Genesis!
Ireland meets SA - mediocre (to be nice)

 

not a fan of peter gabriel but this is a great song. as far as johnny clegg, thats mediocre more often than not.
quote:

Collins is a very talented drummer. I'm a percussion junkie and some of my favourite Gabriel and post-Gabriel Genesis tracks rely heavily on Collins behind the drum kit. However, Gabriel's musical talents, which lie elsewhere at multiple points, are more considerable.

My 'joke' about the difference between the two is using the example of their respective attraction to American R&B. Collins made some cheesy remakes of Motown hits - Motown tending to represent r&b that was commercialized for white/top40 audiences*, whereas Gabriel tapped into the soul of what I would argue is more 'authentic' r&b and transformed it into his own. perfect example: Lovetown.

You could also do a comparison using the kind of soundtrack work they have done, although I admit Buster was kinda fun. but seriously, Disney movies vs. Last Temptation of Christ? Only a major talent could have approached the later.

=====================================

what a ridiculous bullshit!
 kaybee wrote:
This song always moves me to tears.  I wonder how many Steven Biko's are in Gaza right now.
 

Why not asking how many "Little Stevens" are in USA right now?
Or Afghanistan for that matter...

Johnny Clegg and the Cleggs?
Don't tell me this is Genesis!
Ireland meets SA - mediocre (to be nice)

This song always moves me to tears.  I wonder how many Steven Biko's are in Gaza right now.
When I was a kid, this song was the first thing I ever heard about Apartheid. Somebody translated and explained the lyrics for me, and at the end of the song I was in tears. That was a long time ago, but every time I hear it, it brings me back to that evening. There's no way could I get any work done while Biko is running in the background...

 guiguy wrote:
Revolutionary-eye-opening song, think of the time—if you were living then—what UK artist took on such themes; Gabriel is a visionary artist......
 
Agreed. I was a sophomore in high school when I heard this. A college friend told me the story behind the lyrics. Suddenly, in 1981, I knew about Apartheid.



Lots of memories associated with this one —-

 
crockydile wrote:
{#Meditate} One of my all-time favorites. {#Meditate}
 


{#Meditate} One of my all-time favorites. {#Meditate}
 shawshank wrote:

I have one word... sussudio. {#Wink}
 

American Psycho.
 Koan wrote:

Collins is a very talented drummer. I'm a percussion junkie and some of my favourite Gabriel and post-Gabriel Genesis tracks rely heavily on Collins behind the drum kit. However, Gabriel's musical talents, which lie elsewhere at multiple points, are more considerable.

My 'joke' about the difference between the two is using the example of their respective attraction to American R&B. Collins made some cheesy remakes of Motown hits — Motown tending to represent r&b that was commercialized for white/top40 audiences*, whereas Gabriel tapped into the soul of what I would argue is more 'authentic' r&b and transformed it into his own. perfect example: Lovetown.

You could also do a comparison using the kind of soundtrack work they have done, although I admit Buster was kinda fun. but seriously, Disney movies vs. Last Temptation of Christ? Only a major talent could have approached the later.

(* from wikipedia: "Complex arrangements and elaborate, melismatic vocal riffs were avoided; Motown producers believed steadfastly in the "KISS principle" ("keep it simple, stupid"). Berry Gordy used weekly quality control meetings, held every Friday morning, and veto power to ensure that only the very best material and performances the company came up with would be released. The test was that every new release needed to "fit" into a sequence of the top 5 selling pop singles of the week. As a result, several tracks which later became critical and commercial favorites were initially rejected by Gordy (...) In several cases, producers would re-work and re-re-work tracks in hopes of eventually getting them approved at a later Friday morning meeting.")

If I have too much time on my hands to argue my case, it's because I'm sick and homebound and have nothing better to do. {#Shifty}
 
I have one word... sussudio. {#Wink}
...and the eyes of the world are watching now{#Daisy}
One of the best concerts I have ever seen!!!
Revolutionary-eye-opening song, think of the time—if you were living then—what UK artist took on such themes; Gabriel is a visionary artist......
Great Song.


This song is profound... and so good for the ears...


uritsukidoji wrote:


Maybe the people who like this have smoked too much of the rubbish they have at home...
 

Maybe people like you should try the 24 hour Britney Spears channel. Would you like a stick of gum?
Too stinkin' funny!

I can remember the days when the evening news was replete with footage of the unbelievable violence committed by the White South African military. Some of those scenes will never leave my mind.

Some people saw no problem in what the White South African government was doing, and fought tooth and nail to keep the U.S. government from placing official sanctions against the government of South Africa. Some of us marched, wrote letters, and boycotted.

Sometimes the good guys win. God bless you, Steven Biko. Rest easy. You did not die in vain.




This is one of those heavy-weight songs that makes it one of the greatest songs of all time...


 tiggers wrote:
Let's face it Gabriel has a lot more talent than Collins and I am being way too kind there
BTW Phil Collins played the surdu on this track as far as I know.
 
Collins is a very talented drummer. I'm a percussion junkie and some of my favourite Gabriel and post-Gabriel Genesis tracks rely heavily on Collins behind the drum kit. However, Gabriel's musical talents, which lie elsewhere at multiple points, are more considerable.

My 'joke' about the difference between the two is using the example of their respective attraction to American R&B. Collins made some cheesy remakes of Motown hits — Motown tending to represent r&b that was commercialized for white/top40 audiences*, whereas Gabriel tapped into the soul of what I would argue is more 'authentic' r&b and transformed it into his own. perfect example: Lovetown.

You could also do a comparison using the kind of soundtrack work they have done, although I admit Buster was kinda fun. but seriously, Disney movies vs. Last Temptation of Christ? Only a major talent could have approached the later.

(* from wikipedia: "Complex arrangements and elaborate, melismatic vocal riffs were avoided; Motown producers believed steadfastly in the "KISS principle" ("keep it simple, stupid"). Berry Gordy used weekly quality control meetings, held every Friday morning, and veto power to ensure that only the very best material and performances the company came up with would be released. The test was that every new release needed to "fit" into a sequence of the top 5 selling pop singles of the week. As a result, several tracks which later became critical and commercial favorites were initially rejected by Gordy (...) In several cases, producers would re-work and re-re-work tracks in hopes of eventually getting them approved at a later Friday morning meeting.")

If I have too much time on my hands to argue my case, it's because I'm sick and homebound and have nothing better to do. {#Shifty}
wow, a fellow can learn a lot hanging out and listening to music. Thanks for the history of Biko.




extraordinary song, particularly for to be dedicated memory of the Steve Biko -

 ** 9 **




When I travelled southern Africa and Apartheid-era South Africa in 1980/1981, President Reagan had given many white South African boosters of the Apartheid regime hope that the USA would continue to provide strong support.

My Canadian origin was often met with deep frowns;  my American girl friend's American origin was often met with smiles and approval.  Little did they know that my ultra-liberal American girl friend was totally sickened by what we saw and experienced first hand.

 

P.S.  We also met many British-origin and Afrikaaner white South Africans who also shared our views and knew that the end was drawing near.

 

P.P.S.  The US-sponsored Sullivan code and US multi-national companies operating in South Africa played a crucial role in overthrowing the Apartheid regime.



 garthwb wrote:
Steve Biko IS a hero to the people of my beautiful, beleaguered land. It WAS a tragedy, and a brutal misuse of power, as well as a miscarriage of justice in the aftermath, but he WAS NOT a martyr, he did not give himself willingly up to die a martyr's death, he simply died after being brutalised and clubbed, in what was otherwise meant to be a routine arrest/questioning. Thus it was tragic, and he is still a hero to all people fighting to end civil rights injustices, but there is always a tendency to factually enlarge upon an ACTUAL situation. His life was, and still is, infinitely more important than his death, what he fought for, along with millions of others, was the great legacy he left us.
 
Thank you. Thank you so much for helping us understand a complex, hideous situation.

Peace,

c.

 uritsukidoji wrote:


Maybe the people who like this have smoked too much of the rubbish they have at home...
 

Maybe people like you should try the 24 hour Britney Spears channel. Would you like a stick of gum?



Stephen Bantu Biko (18 December 1946 - 12 September 1977) was a noted anti-apartheid activist in South Africa in the 1960s and early 1970s...  on 18 August 1977, Biko was arrested at a police roadblock under the Terrorism Act No 83 of 1967... he suffered a major head injury while in police custody, and was chained to a window grille for a day... on 11 September 1977 police loaded him in the back of a Land Rover, naked, and began the 1,500 km drive to Pretoria to take him to a prison with hospital facilities in order to treat the already near-dead Biko... he died shortly after arrival at the Pretoria prison, on 12 September...


 garthwb wrote:
Steve Biko IS a hero to the people of my beautiful, beleaguered land. It WAS a tragedy, and a brutal misuse of power, as well as a miscarriage of justice in the aftermath, but he WAS NOT a martyr, he did not give himself willingly up to die a martyr's death, he simply died after being brutalised and clubbed, in what was otherwise meant to be a routine arrest/questioning. Thus it was tragic, and he is still a hero to all people fighting to end civil rights injustices, but there is always a tendency to factually enlarge upon an ACTUAL situation. His life was, and still is, infinitely more important than his death, what he fought for, along with millions of others, was the great legacy he left us.
 
well said

{#Clap}

this song has always moved me in a positive way

great song. My only complaint is that I am at work and can't turn this up louder.
 garthwb wrote:

Nice...

 

{#Exclaim}some times you have to allow for the intelligence or lack of ,of some people (with the I.Q.equal to or below that of a freshly made Tick Turd)....hang in there, the majority understand the depth of this music!!!
:yawn:
"The most potent weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed." -- Stephen Biko
NeilBlanchard wrote:
Hello, Here's Stephen Biko's Wikipedia bio: (click here) Beautiful song about the brutal torturous murder of an innocent person -- and you're complaining about the quality of the messenger's voice. Neil
Nice...
Hello, Here's Stephen Biko's Wikipedia bio: (click here) Beautiful song about the brutal torturous murder of an innocent person -- and you're complaining about the quality of the messenger's voice. Neil
Steve Biko IS a hero to the people of my beautiful, beleaguered land. It WAS a tragedy, and a brutal misuse of power, as well as a miscarriage of justice in the aftermath, but he WAS NOT a martyr, he did not give himself willingly up to die a martyr's death, he simply died after being brutalised and clubbed, in what was otherwise meant to be a routine arrest/questioning. Thus it was tragic, and he is still a hero to all people fighting to end civil rights injustices, but there is always a tendency to factually enlarge upon an ACTUAL situation. His life was, and still is, infinitely more important than his death, what he fought for, along with millions of others, was the great legacy he left us.
xc_para_puravida wrote:
Too much time spent in one of your hometown's famed "coffee" shops, I suspect?
Maybe the people who like this have smoked too much of the rubbish they have at home...
Mewsique wrote:
Perhaps he should stay away from politics...? Just a thought, use it don't use it!
Perhaps you should stay away from commenting about PG - you obviously know nothing about him if you can make a comment like that.
The song is very moving to me. I'm sure Gabriel mythologizes Biko a bit, but that's what he does.
Perhaps he should stay away from politics...? Just a thought, use it don't use it!
bronorb wrote:
Saw him do this in concert around 1986-87. Probably the closest I've ever come to a religious experience. Seriously.
:yes: :yes: :yes:
Paul_Skybreakers wrote:
Overplayed. And boring. Also, Peter Gabriel's voice sounds like someone scratching a blackboard with his fingernails. And although I'm sure if he means well with his lyrics, it just doesn't help. sorry everybody :taped-shut: :cheers:
Too much time spent in one of your hometown's famed "coffee" shops, I suspect?
I do feel Phil borrowed instrumentation, arranging, voicing, sound effects, staging and more from Gabriel, Hackett, Banks and then added his own songwriting (or vice versa;) anyway - always felt he took liberally from all he'd learned in Genesis.