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Pink Floyd — Another Brick In The Wall (Part 2)
Album: The Wall
Avg rating:
8.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1080









Released: 1979
Length: 3:52
Plays (last 30 days): 0
We don't need no education
We don't need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teacher leave them kids alone
Hey teacher leave them kids alone

All in all it's just another brick in the wall
All in all you're just another brick in the wall[[#Notes|1]]

We don't need no education
We don't need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teachers leave them kids alone
Hey teacher leave us kids alone

All in all it's just another brick in the wall
All in all you're just another brick in the wall

''Wrong! Do it again. Wrong! Do it again.
If you don't eat yer meat, you can't have any pudding! How can you have any pudding if you don't eat yer meat?
You! Yes, you behind the bike sheds, stand still, laddy!''[[#Notes|2]]
Comments (222)add comment
THIRTY FIVE years old. I remember studying for the FCC 2nd class to this album
Two songs in a row about English Bands discussing how the school system permanently scared them.  Fastinating choices 
 rdo wrote:
Really?  I find music like this comforting.  For the same reason I am drawn to literature and poetry.  It is just nice to know others think the same thoughts as you do about the world, have the same feelings.  That is what art is all about.  I think about where I would have wound up without this in my life, with my temperament, and I think I probably would have committed suicide, out of loneliness.  Great art connects us to other people in a way nothing else can.  Many get solace from religion as well, and art and religion are not so very different historically, a lot of overlap there.
 
{#Cheers}
 Hannio wrote:


People commit suicide for many reasons piled high on each other until the breaking point is reached.  I have no doubt that listening to something as depressing as The Wall has contributed to suicides.

 
Really?  I find music like this comforting.  For the same reason I am drawn to literature and poetry.  It is just nice to know others think the same thoughts as you do about the world, have the same feelings.  That is what art is all about.  I think about where I would have wound up without this in my life, with my temperament, and I think I probably would have committed suicide, out of loneliness.  Great art connects us to other people in a way nothing else can.  Many get solace from religion as well, and art and religion are not so very different historically, a lot of overlap there.
 misterbearbaby wrote:
It's how we announce dinner in my home, by shrieking in an exaggerated British accent: "HOW CAN YOU HAVE ANY PUDDING IF YOU DON'T EAT YOUR MEAT!!"
 
Everybody in my mushrooming multitude of homeless camps loves this song...  The Wall is one of the top 10 albums of all time, along with Dark Side of the Moon, Paul Simon's album Graceland, U2's album The Joshua Tree, and a bunch of albums by The Beatles...

Sir Paul McCartney raps for Meat Free Monday - video 
It's how we announce dinner in my home, by shrieking in an exaggerated British accent: "HOW CAN YOU HAVE ANY PUDDING IF YOU DON'T EAT YOUR MEAT!!"
 reindeer wrote:

It was definitely a contributing factor, as my brother had it on his turntable when we found his body.
Every time it's played here I need to shut down RP and do something else because it's so upsetting.
This album is depressing in the extreme, and it has nothing to offer.
It's anti-education, and it offers no hope.



 
I'm sorry about your brother, but the album has to be seen in context - it is autobiographical.

I recognise parts of the school life represented, I'm just a few years younger than the writer. 
 Hannio wrote:


People commit suicide for many reasons piled high on each other until the breaking point is reached.  I have no doubt that listening to something as depressing as The Wall has contributed to suicides.

 
It was definitely a contributing factor, as my brother had it on his turntable when we found his body.
Every time it's played here I need to shut down RP and do something else because it's so upsetting.
This album is depressing in the extreme, and it has nothing to offer.
It's anti-education, and it offers no hope.


 Right there with you, friend.

meauclaire wrote:
Really enjoyed this song the first 45,000 times I heard it but not so much for the last 300,000.

 


  {#Wave}say what you like....this is still what it was....a masterpiece  {#Crown}  ....loving theme in your programming this morning, Bill and Rebecca
Boy, do I miss this band.
Ok, I'm almost certain to regret posting this but...what the hell. It's a spoof. It was Purim. And Roger Waters has gotten insufferably self-righteously lately and deserves a bit of mocking. Enjoy (or not) 

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJQtXigwLIY
Really enjoyed this song the first 45,000 times I heard it but not so much for the last 300,000.
When this came out of the speakers of Dad's Marantz in December of '79, we FREAKED! and Life was never quite the same. Still love it!

they dont make records like this anymore ;-(
 kretinburger wrote:
This song should not be played on RP.Whilst Floyd is in my top 5 of all bands this was destroyed by commercial radio.As far as they are concerned they only recorded one song,this one.Arseholes!

 
I firmly reject the notion that RP shouldn't play this just because commercial radio has done so.
Good ol' D minor.
well, off to listen to the whole album now!
Overplayed, as is Comfortably Numb, but both songs do contain 2 classic Gilmour guitar solos. 
 Ghiaap wrote:
I don't know what it is but since I ever heard this song I don't like it (at all). But I take my minority opinion most humble, because most RP-listeners are giving 10+'s  when something of PF is in the playlist.....

 

Mhmm. Not as bad as the Beatles crowd on RP though. How they adore that boy band.
"We don't need no education..."
"Yes you do, you just used a double negative."

- IT Crowd 
{#Yell} {#Guitarist}one of the best bands ever recorded.{#Bananapiano}   great music is timeless.................
I don't know what it is but since I ever heard this song I don't like it (at all). But I take my minority opinion most humble, because most RP-listeners are giving 10+'s  when something of PF is in the playlist.....
This song should not be played on RP.Whilst Floyd is in my top 5 of all bands this was destroyed by commercial radio.As far as they are concerned they only recorded one song,this one.Arseholes!
 stevendejong wrote:

While of course you have every right to hate an album, especially if it has such a negative association for you, which I am sorry to hear, let's be realistic and not confuse correlation and causality. The person close to you did not commit suicide because The Wall is so depressing.

 

People commit suicide for many reasons piled high on each other until the breaking point is reached.  I have no doubt that listening to something as depressing as The Wall has contributed to suicides.
This album is to my kids as Sgt. Pepper was to me. They have been raised on it. My nine year old can tell Waters from Gilmour in songs he's hearing for the first time. To me, this album is profound in a way that almost no other albums can be
I must be broken. Never did like this album. It sounded like the same song played over and over on 4 sides of vinyl. Bring it.
 Proclivities wrote:
I don't know if it's really "lost on most people" - most people probably learned about the use (and misuse) of double negatives in elementary school.  It's use in this tune is a good application of verbal irony, sort of like Carly Simon's lyrics to "You're So Vain".

 
It was certainly lost on much of the chatterati and Press commentators at the time. I remember when it came out, and stayed at No. 1 for many weeks, and all the pundits were banging on about the double negative and completely missing the whole feckin' point of the song. Hardly surprising.

As it happens, the double negative is very common in European languages, such as French ("je ne sais pas") and Italian ("non so nulla") to my knowledge.
COOL!  It has come to pass -- this, played just after ST's School!
---------------
Posted: May 03, 2006 - 08:54
 

Now this brings back chills... 
and if we could just cue up 
Days of Our Lives
from The Wall... 
     

YOU! YES, YOU! 
STAND STILL, LADDIE! STAND STILL! 
Ya can't have any pudding if ya don't eat yer meat! 
How can ya have any pudding if ya don't eat yer meat?
--You're comin' along!  
 Relayer wrote:
I absolutely love the fact that Roger purposely penned a double negative in the chorus.  It is probably lost on most people, but the double negative is a very clever way of contradicting the phrase that "we don't need no education"; showing that you actually do need education.

Saw The Wall 2 weeks ago in Orlando.  Second time seeing the show in 2 years.  Words cannot describe how incredible it was. 

 
....saw both in 2 years in Ft. Laud!!! ....amazing! Tried to get a fellow Floyd fan to go BOTH times, but he couldnt do it if Gilmour wasn't there?!!
TOTALLY his loss....It's like saying you wouldn't see Paul McCartney....."If you can't be with the one you love,......"
 sajitjacob wrote:
Some time in the mid nineties my flat mate at the time asked me if I fancied a road trip to France (from Norfolk) so he could visit his parents and we could have boozy sort of a road trip. As one does when young. I was between jobs and it sounded like fun so off we went.

After an adventurously drunk time in Paris we drove to Mulhouse to visit his parents. We listened to the entire album followed by the "Final Cut". The car was completely silent during the whole thing and the following day we visited a WWII cemetery. My head was still full of Waters' scalpel lyrics, the result was one the few genuinely heart rending moments of my life; all those graves and all that horror. Thinking about it still brings a lump to my throat.

On the same trip, I also had a religious experience while gazing at a stained glass window in Norte Dame, however I suspect that has more to do with the spectacular hangover, hairy dog and many double espressos than any kind of true spiritual awakening.

Fear and Loathing in Alsace Lorraine.
 
Thanks for the sharing the visual. Interesting read. Nice post.
Some time in the mid nineties my flat mate at the time asked me if I fancied a road trip to France (from Norfolk) so he could visit his parents and we could have boozy sort of a road trip. As one does when young. I was between jobs and it sounded like fun so off we went.

After an adventurously drunk time in Paris we drove to Mulhouse to visit his parents. We listened to the entire album followed by the "Final Cut". The car was completely silent during the whole thing and the following day we visited a WWII cemetery. My head was still full of Waters' scalpel lyrics, the result was one the few genuinely heart rending moments of my life; all those graves and all that horror. Thinking about it still brings a lump to my throat.

On the same trip, I also had a religious experience while gazing at a stained glass window in Norte Dame, however I suspect that has more to do with the spectacular hangover, hairy dog and many double espressos than any kind of true spiritual awakening.

Fear and Loathing in Alsace Lorraine.

Everybody in my church loves this profound song...  and this seminal album...
 
Dreamy quality art and content (message), thank you.
 Relayer wrote:
I absolutely love the fact that Roger purposely penned a double negative in the chorus.  It is probably lost on most people, but the double negative is a very clever way of contradicting the phrase that "we don't need no education"; showing that you actually do need education.

Saw The Wall 2 weeks ago in Orlando.  Second time seeing the show in 2 years.  Words cannot describe how incredible it was. 
 

I don't know if it's really "lost on most people" - most people probably learned about the use (and misuse) of double negatives in elementary school.  It's use in this tune is a good application of verbal irony, sort of like Carly Simon's lyrics to "You're So Vain".
Always have been in love with the simplistic, genius bass part!
The Walll !!! OK, we in Germany came over it. Peace on Earth!!!!
The tragic thing is that this really is a very good album, but the classic rock stations grind it into the ground. I you avoid it like the plague for a few years and then let yourself listen again, it is much better. I had to do that with Led Zepplin for a bout 14 years. Stupid radio.
Though I'm sick of this tune and much of this album...it's still stellar and have a soft spot for the way they pushed thru the crap of 1979 with this song!
The London Royal Philharmonic Orchestra does a wonderful version, just a hint!

bingo by jingo...  love this song...  love this album...
 
 romeotuma wrote:




 
We love this song...

 
 t00lur wrote:
romeotuma = Bill
 


somedayfunnies_p89_aroth_72web.jpg

 midigitguy wrote:
A simply superb guitar solo...
 
{#Music}  {#Dancingbanana_2}
Ouch.
 stevendejong wrote:
...Also, of the 26 separate numbers on the album, only 4 would qualify as playable on commercial radio (Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2; Mother; Hey You; and Comfortably Numb)....
 
Run Like Hell was a commercial radio staple, and Young Lust made a good run as well.
 midigitguy wrote:
A simply superb guitar solo...
 
{#Cheers}
romeotuma = Bill
One of their biggest hits...
Remains good, even after heard it more than a thousand times!
This song was out when I was studying for my 2nd class FCC license. We would all scream this song at appropriate intervals during study time at school.
What good did a 1st class do me? Ray-gun deregulated the Media a very few years after. Now we have Clear Channel and FOX. What an improvement....
 jberko wrote:
This was Pink Floyd's big break into commercial rock.  Up until then, they were an album rock band.  I know that Dark Side was commercially successful, but it was on their terms.  This was a whole lot more geared towards AM and FM pop-rock air play.  Not saying its awful, but it is nowhere as good as earlier efforts.
 
I don't agree on the commercial rock and radio-aimed songwriting. In fact, The Wall was a concept album, which means it was intended to be played in it's entirety, quite like all predecessors up to and including Dark Side Of The Moon.

Also, of the 26 separate numbers on the album, only 4 would qualify as playable on commercial radio (Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2; Mother; Hey You; and Comfortably Numb). That's 15%. Granted, the album that came before, Animals, which is my favorite, had 5 numbers, none of which were radio-friendly. Wish You Were Here had 5 as well, with 2 radio-friendly ones (Have A Cigar; Wish You Were Here), i.e., 40%. Dark Side Of The Moon had 10, with 2 rather successful rock radio tracks (Time; Money), i.e., 20%. 
 reindeer wrote:
Hate this song and the whole album. It's so depressing that someone close to me committed suicide listening to it.
Fucking depressing shit.  Please Bill, there are better songs out there.
 
While of course you have every right to hate an album, especially if it has such a negative association for you, which I am sorry to hear, let's be realistic and not confuse correlation and causality. The person close to you did not commit suicide because The Wall is so depressing.
I think it was New Musical Express back in the day that had come up with an alternate version of the lyrics to this song in their review of this album. I can only remember a few lines, goes something like this:

" We dont need no inspiration
   we dont need no thoughts at all"

and

"Hey! Rock star! Give the fans a loan!"

I'm a big Floyd fan, but I remember thinking that was kinda funny.
 Relayer wrote:
I absolutely love the fact that Roger purposely penned a double negative in the chorus.  It is probably lost on most people, but the double negative is a very clever way of contradicting the phrase that "we don't need no education"; showing that you actually do need education.

Saw The Wall 2 weeks ago in Orlando.  Second time seeing the show in 2 years.  Words cannot describe how incredible it was. 
 
I saw the Austin show in May and yes..incredible.
Are you sure he penned that purposely, btw?I mean if that's the case, I guess Waters thinks we need thought control too...
A proper education begins at home only to be 'supplemented' by  learning institutions.  Unfortunately these institutions have become dangerous !  I often wonder if they do more harm than good. {#Ask}
This was Pink Floyd's big break into commercial rock.  Up until then, they were an album rock band.  I know that Dark Side was commercially successful, but it was on their terms.  This was a whole lot more geared towards AM and FM pop-rock air play.  Not saying its awful, but it is nowhere as good as earlier efforts.
Hate this song and the whole album. It's so depressing that someone close to me committed suicide listening to it.
Fucking depressing shit.  Please Bill, there are better songs out there.


I absolutely love the fact that Roger purposely penned a double negative in the chorus.  It is probably lost on most people, but the double negative is a very clever way of contradicting the phrase that "we don't need no education"; showing that you actually do need education.

Saw The Wall 2 weeks ago in Orlando.  Second time seeing the show in 2 years.  Words cannot describe how incredible it was. 
Just read on-line — when the Sandusky dude in Pa. reported to jail —the inmates were singing to him "teacher— leave them kids alone!" {#Yell}  and may he never be released{#Exclaim}
"We don't need no education..."
"Yes you do, you just used a double negative!"

- Maurice Moss, IT Crowd
A comedy series as recommended as this song. Warmly. 
The last bit in the song "Stand still, laddie!!!"  reminds me of when I was a guest of Her Majesty's British Forces Education Service while my dad was assigned as liaison to the 1. Deutsch-niederländischen Korps in Muenster.  I went to the school at the neighboring Royal Army base since there was no American school.  Anyway, our geography teacher, Mr Shepherd, was an old Scot with quite a volatile temper.  Our classroom was next to the gym  locker room, and one day the kids coming back from PE were particularly boisterous and making quite a bit of noise.  Mr Shepherd had all he could take, grabbed an old sneaker out of his desk and stormed out of the room.  A few seconds later there was quite a lot of yelling and screaming and boys pleading, "No Mr Shepherd, no!"  We were all quite amused, if not a little nervous when he returned, and quite calmly resumed the lesson.
 rommi wrote:
this song always makes me take a brake from work :) 
 

 Hannio wrote:

You work at an auto parts store?
 
{#Lol}
 rommi wrote:
this song always makes me take a brake from work :) 
 
You work at an auto parts store?
Saw Roger Waters do The Wall live on Sunday night.  Fantastic show.  It was amazing to be just a few feet from the guy who wrote this masterpiece, and its impact really hits you when you see it live.
This album gets a resounding meh.
 kaybee wrote:
Maybe I'm not getting it but the lyrics have always irritated me.  I understand that the public (is that the right term?) school system in Britain really sucks and has been used to keep the working and poorer classes down.  But children do need a (good!) education otherwise they are easily lead around by the nose by the powers that be... witness the gradual dumbing down of America due to enormous education cuts since the 80's.  And Canada's not much better....On the other hand...:

If ye don't eat yarrr meat, how can ya get any puddin??

 
Possibly reading too much in to it, for me, as a Brit, its just about the schooling system whereby the kids are just processed like items on a conveyor.   My british schooling was very much like this and I think that it still is.  the normal comprehensive schools dont have enough money to pay for educated teachers who are willing to spend extra time supporting the misguided children leave alone channeling the gifted.  there is currently a fight to update the teaching of computers which is stuck in a silabus of teaching microsoft word, powerpoint and excel (microsoft donated the teaching supplies some years ago).  there is no understanding of networks or programming.  RasPi is hopefully going some way to resolve this one issue. However there will always be poor teachers who will use the hatred in their lives and take it out on the defenceless kids .
I don't know why but this track always get me into a positive mode..strange when I read the lyrics..
to be fair though it's not really the teacher's fault
alot of them are trying to do a good job
it's the school board and the whole political system of public education that incarcerates the young minds and tries to condition them for society
i agree with the sentiment of the song however
public education is a crime against humanity
 
Yes, a good song for working at the office on a Saturday.  Hah, I don't think I am significant enough to qualify as a brick though.
 rommi wrote:
this song always makes me take a brake from work :) 
 
What a delightfully appropriate comment for this song...
this song always makes me take a brake from work :) 
 fredriley wrote:
What amused me enormously when this came out was all the reactionary green inkers and pedants banging on about how ungrammatical "We don't need no education" is, which missed the song's point by a country mile and walked straight into its irony.

This reminds me of one fateful year I spent in a cheapissimo boarding school as a kid, when they insisted on feeding me Marmite sandwiches, and told me that if I didn't eat my Marmite I'd not get my sweet. Because they were too feckin' thick to realise that Marmite made (and still makes) me gag, and that I wasn't being wilfully obstinate, I did without my puddings for a whole year.
 
If you don't eat your slime how can you get any swill?

Your story smacks of a bait-and-switch tale out of Dickens. It takes me back to own experiences of dealing with dishonest and dim authority figures, thankfully free of Marmite or any foodstuff. I'd think at the time, "We kids all know you're bullshit. Deep down, you must know you're a lump as well. Do you really think you're fooling us for a second?" 

As I've posted way too many times, I'm really tired of this whole album. But I thank Roger Waters for flipping off all the shams and bullies who were really supposed to teach and guide us. 



This song is soooo good it puts a spring in my step this spring night...

 
A simply superb guitar solo...


This song is soooo good it puts a spring in my step this spring morning...

 
romeotuma = Loser Troll
 SinisterDexter wrote:

romeotuma, you're new catch phrase is getting tiring, really fast - I've already seen this on a half-dozen songs.

 
Keep with that phsare romeotuma! By the way, where in Vegas is that hotel?
 romeotuma wrote:
This song is soooo good my nipples get hard when I hear it... 
 
romeotuma, you're new catch phrase is getting tiring, really fast - I've already seen this on a half-dozen songs.

 fredriley wrote:

Well, you've got to see the song in the context of the whole concept album, and read it as it was - Roger Waters' view on his schooling and what it did to him. Releasing it as a single really did take it out of context, though it amusingly led to outraged pundits sarcastically going on about the grammatical error in "We don't need no education", little realising that the joke was on them.

 
The pundits must not have read their Wordsworth. "The child is father to the man."   What does that say about English education?  Just playing around. 
 midigitguy wrote:
One of the most sublime guitar solos ever////
 
I'd agree with that!

One of the most sublime guitar solos ever////
 treatment_bound wrote:

I don't think he's played it since the St.of Illinois whacked this guy almost 18 years ago. 


 It's pretty sad and somewhat ironic that these days Dahl's been downsized to podcasting from his own "crawl space"...
 
Gacy!, leave those kids alone!


This song is soooo good my nipples get hard when I hear it...

 


excellent...

 
 johnjconn wrote:
Those from the Chicago area may remember the other version from 30 yrs ago by Steve Dahl "Another kid in the crawl"
 
I don't think he's played it since the St.of Illinois whacked this guy almost 18 years ago. 


 It's pretty sad and somewhat ironic that these days Dahl's been downsized to podcasting from his own "crawl space"...



This is a truly brilliant song from one of the best albums of all time...  love it...

 
 emmilina wrote:

Remember Steve and Gary....don't you know that skylabs coming down down down!
 
scum bag worm meat idiots

 johnjconn wrote:
Those from the Chicago area may remember the other version from 30 yrs ago by Steve Dahl "Another kid in the crawl"

Funny, but tasteless

 


Remember Steve and Gary....don't you know that skylabs coming down down down!
I agree that this song and Money are certainly not the best of Floyd, but the guitar work and the child chorus elevate it above it's limits.
 linzie wrote:
No bigger Floyd fan here, but this one and Money, while good, were never two of my favorites....

Maybe they were played too often, I dunno...

I understand how this fits into the concept of the album, however...and I must say, after seeing RW do it live this summer, it did jump a notch or two.

...and how can ya NOT like the guitar??
 

I'll second that


Those from the Chicago area may remember the other version from 30 yrs ago by Steve Dahl "Another kid in the crawl"

Funny, but tasteless


Everybody in my hotel room loves this song...
 
No bigger Floyd fan here, but this one and Money, while good, were never two of my favorites....

Maybe they were played too often, I dunno...

I understand how this fits into the concept of the album, however...and I must say, after seeing RW do it live this summer, it did jump a notch or two.

...and how can ya NOT like the guitar??
 kaybee wrote:
Maybe I'm not getting it but the lyrics have always irritated me.  I understand that the public (is that the right term?) school system in Britain really sucks and has been used to keep the working and poorer classes down.  But children do need a (good!) education otherwise they are easily lead around by the nose by the powers that be... witness the gradual dumbing down of America due to enormous education cuts since the 80's.  And Canada's not much better....On the other hand...:

If ye don't eat yarrr meat, how can ya get any puddin??

 
I think that's all part of the irony of the song.  People without a proper education were teaching, something that I've seen still in the rural schools back home.  Student teachers were more or less handed over full classes due to lack of proper staffing or completely disinterested teachers. 

It was a frequent story that the people in the top of the class in the high school I went to barely made it past their first quarter in college due to not really knowing how to work hard in school.  The girl I was dating throughout most of high school was 4th in her class with a 3.9 GPA and ended up dropping one class and still ended up on academic probation after her first quarter. 

It all comes down to under educated people believe what they are told, do not take an active role in the world, and spend what money they get.  Those kind of people are much better for a capitalist economy than an educated and informed work force.  Plus, educated people tend to vote more, and generally for one of our two political parties, which is one of the reasons that the other is so eager to cut education funding. 

As much as I love Pink Floyd, this album will always bring back rather strange memories...

A friend of mine and I used to spend hours listening to this entire album over and over and practicing our English accents when we were in high school.  We would often hit the local college town and actually managed to convince several freshmen girls that we were exchange students from London and didn't know our way around town yet.  We also suggested that we were looking for apartments, which of course got us invited back to several apartments on campus. 

The only thing that sours that memory is the fact that we never actually manged to seal the deal with any of the girls.  Either the accent would slip, they'd catch us up somehow, or we happened to find girls who were just not interested at all in us like that.  There were a few near misses...  and we nearly got beaten up when I let my accent slip in a frat house.

Good times, something to make me laugh at how stupid I was as a kid.
Maybe I'm not getting it but the lyrics have always irritated me.  I understand that the public (is that the right term?) school system in Britain really sucks and has been used to keep the working and poorer classes down.  But children do need a (good!) education otherwise they are easily lead around by the nose by the powers that be... witness the gradual dumbing down of America due to enormous education cuts since the 80's.  And Canada's not much better....On the other hand...:

If ye don't eat yarrr meat, how can ya get any puddin??

 fredriley wrote:
 I did without my puddings for a whole year.
 

Heh. That explains it all Fred!
Pink Floyd song out of album context. Amazing how much better this song truly is during the natural genius flow.
What amused me enormously when this came out was all the reactionary green inkers and pedants banging on about how ungrammatical "We don't need no education" is, which missed the song's point by a country mile and walked straight into its irony.

This reminds me of one fateful year I spent in a cheapissimo boarding school as a kid, when they insisted on feeding me Marmite sandwiches, and told me that if I didn't eat my Marmite I'd not get my sweet. Because they were too feckin' thick to realise that Marmite made (and still makes) me gag, and that I wasn't being wilfully obstinate, I did without my puddings for a whole year.
Their biggest hit, and probably my least favorite Floyd tune. Coincidence? Maybe, it's certainly overplayed. But it's just kind of plodding and doesn't move me at all...


Absolutely profound song with great music to boot...  from one of the greatest albums of eternity...  love it...




We be dancing...  love this song...


 g-rod wrote:

What I would not give to see that man break out the trumpet for the guitar solo! {#Lol}
 


I hear ya!  I love hearing the original here on Radio Paradise...



 romeotuma wrote:
We don't need no stinkin' badges!



 

 


 romeotuma wrote:




 
 
What I would not give to see that man break out the trumpet for the guitar solo! {#Lol}






 

 Rebis wrote:
Really, RP? If you wanna play Pink Floyd, please find another track. This gimmick song expired decades ago.
 
Here's an even bigger gimmick.

"if you don't eat your meat, you won't get your pudding'.... ah.... fond childhood memories of the seminary

 Rebis wrote:
Really, RP? If you wanna play Pink Floyd, please find another track. This gimmick song expired decades ago.
 
I wouldn't call it "gimmick" - it's considerably more thoughtful and artistic that that - but it could stand to be moved to the back shelf for awhile.

LOL.  I just knew this was coming up after Supertramp's "School".
One of the best rock guitar riffs of all time (IMHO).  Gilmour is truly inspired!
Is that kid screaming, "RUSSELL!!!! COME HERE!!!!!" at the end?
Hey you behind the bike sheds.... stand still laddy...
Really, RP? If you wanna play Pink Floyd, please find another track. This gimmick song expired decades ago.
3 songs about school (1 more coming) :)
{#Daisy}For ever good.....love this song{#Group-hug}
{#Dancingbanana_2}
 DaveInVA wrote:
Now they need to play "Steve Dahl & Teenage Radiation’ version of this song ...

 
You are of course referring to his 'tasteful tribute' to John Wayne Gacy, "Another Kid in the Crawl".  I didn't think Dahl's humor "radiated" much outside of greater Chicago.  How did you get turned on to this 30+ year-old nugget living out in VA?