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Yes — Starship Trooper
Album: The Yes Album
Avg rating:
7.4

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1487









Released: 1971
Length: 9:11
Plays (last 30 days): 1
I. Life Seeker

Sister bluebird flying high above
Shine your wings forward to the sun
Hide the myst'ries of life on your way
Though you've seen them, please don't say a word
What you don't know, I have never heard

Starship trooper, go sailing on by
Catch my soul, catch the very light
Hide the moment from my eager eye
Though you've seen them, please don't tell a soul
What you can't see, can't be very whole

Speak to me of summer
Long winters longer than time can remember
The setting up of other roads
To travel on in old accustomed ways
I still remember the talks by the water
The proud sons and daughter
That knew the knowledge of the land
Spoke to me in sweet accustomed ways

Mother life, hold firmly on to me
Catch my knowledge higher than the day
Lose as much as only you can show
Though you've seen me, please don't say a word
What I don't know, I have never shared

II. Disillusion

Loneliness is a power that we possess to give or take away forever
All I know can be shown by your acceptance of the facts there shown before you
Take what I say in a different way and it's easy to say that this is all confusion
As I see a new day in me, I can also show it you and you may follow

Speak to me of summer
Long winters longer than time can remember
The setting up of other roads
To travel on in old accustomed ways
I still remember the talks by the water
The proud sons and daughter
That knew the knowledge of the land
Spoke to me in sweet accustomed ways
Comments (398)add comment
 diannemck56 wrote:
How can anyone not LOVE LOVE LOVE this group?  So many different pieces going on, vocals, harmony, bass guitar ...  it just goes on and on.  Going from an 8 to a 9 .
 
Saw them first in 1973 with FRONT ROW SEATS debuting "Close To the Edge."
I've been a Yes Head ever since.

I can remember the lyrics from this song for the last 40+ years.... yet can't remember where I put my car keys earlier this morning...
absolutely part of the plan!
How can anyone not LOVE LOVE LOVE this group?  So many different pieces going on, vocals, harmony, bass guitar ...  it just goes on and on.  Going from an 8 to a 9 .
 DocStrangelove wrote:
just say no to Yes.
{#Frustrated}Anderson, Squire, Howe, Wakeman, Brufford...?!?!!
One of the greatest band ever
 

 Breakerofchains wrote:
What could be more life affirming than music by a band called "Yes?"
 
A band called "Yes, And"?
A lot of potential but very little good music.
What could be more life affirming than music by a band called "Yes?"
read this comment in a Westminster London accent:

I bloody love this arty farty rock music.
Still one of my favorite song crescendos and endings of all time. Just when you think it can't build any more, it does. Then the emotional release when Steve Howe begins the dueling guitar solos is like a cool drink after a long run.
LONG LIVE PROG! and oh, the glorious fadeout
 LowPhreak wrote:

Being the "dirty hippie" that he was, rumor is that he hadn't showered for a few days...maybe even a whole week. So they had to get the plastic head to put next to him since of course it had no sense of smell.

Or the head was some kind of oracle from the astral plane that only proggers like Yes were attuned to. That's where they glommed so many of their song ideas from.

Or it could have been to add to the mystique of the band at the time to make people think, "WTF is that floating head for? What does it mean?" Or that the head represented the mind, that Yes' music was a "thinking person's" rock music.

And of course, it could creep you out if you fixated on it (and the empty chair) after a hit of the dreaded lysergic...

I'd be glad to answer any other silly questions that may come up on this. {#Wink}

 
Thanks for clearing that up.
{#Cheers}
Because that's Tony. 

Jon is the short guy, upper right. 


kcar wrote:

Isn't everything?

Why wouldn't anyone sit next to Jon? That's what I'd like to know.  

 


Love Howe's fazed guitar on Wurm.

Transcendent.

And congrats on getting into the Hall of Fame. 
I'm thinking of how this song reminds me of the spring melt while growing up in Ottawa in the early 1970s.

And then seeing the big banner on the webpage:

radio paradise depends on YOU
 
Now, where is the wallet again.....?

———————————————————————

Anybody listen to the Steven Wilson remix of this album?  Worth buying?  
 
 kcar wrote:

Isn't everything?

Why wouldn't anyone sit next to Jon? That's what I'd like to know.  

 
Being the "dirty hippie" that he was, rumor is that he hadn't showered for a few days...maybe even a whole week. So they had to get the plastic head to put next to him since of course it had no sense of smell.

Or the head was some kind of oracle from the astral plane that only proggers like Yes were attuned to. That's where they glommed so many of their song ideas from.

Or it could have been to add to the mystique of the band at the time to make people think, "WTF is that floating head for? What does it mean?" Or that the head represented the mind, that Yes' music was a "thinking person's" rock music.

And of course, it could creep you out if you fixated on it (and the empty chair) after a hit of the dreaded lysergic...

I'd be glad to answer any other silly questions that may come up on this. {#Wink}
The brain is a funny place. Listening to Starship Trooper after so many years reminds me of being a college disc jockey in '72 and playing a group of three songs that were a bit more rocking than typical for their groups at the time: Homberg (Procol Harem), Starship Trooper and Yours is No Disgrace (both Yes). Thanks for that weird memory jog of sitting in the basement of Carnegie Hall at Bucknell University, spinning vinyl when it felt like so much fun. Now, back to the present. As always, thanks for playing lots of different music. Years of listening to RP and I'm still enjoying it!
This is great.  After 45 years or so, I finally get it.
 DocStrangelove wrote:
just say no to Yes.
{#Frustrated}

 
this does seem to go on and on...
.
.
(later that same day)
.
....and on and on 
just say no to Yes.
{#Frustrated}
A fantastic song from an album that would never be equalled.
Fabulous thingie!!! {#Dancingbanana_2}{#Bananapiano}{#Bananasplit}{#Bananajumprope}{#Dancingbanana}{#Dance}{#Whistle}{#Clap}
Especially the final tune{#Sunny}
Thanks for playing this song.  
 treatment_bound wrote:

Cool.  Can you please explain WTF that "floating head" is on the album cover?  
Is it from your elevator?

 
Isn't everything?

Why wouldn't anyone sit next to Jon? That's what I'd like to know.  
 Lazarus wrote: 
Cool.  Can you please explain WTF that "floating head" is on the album cover?  
Is it from your elevator?
 kingart wrote:
My favorite Yes song. 
Roundabout is good, too, but its lyrics are too inscrutable and maybe a bit indulgent. This is epic and poetic with a progression to a fab crescendo. 

 
Roundabout as a whole is inscrutable and indulgent. This is better. Still don't like it much.
About as 10 as it gets for me.
Two songs from this album played the same day.  Blimey.
My favorite Yes song. 
Roundabout is good, too, but its lyrics are too inscrutable and maybe a bit indulgent. This is epic and poetic with a progression to a fab crescendo. 
 LowPhreak wrote:

I think they stand up just fine. Song lyrics are a form of poetry, and metaphor and allegory are well-known literary devices.
 
It only recently "hit me" concerning their lyrics. They don't necessarily make sense. But, oh they do. I think that they are another musical component of the whole. Poetic - yes. Metaphoric - perhaps. But, I think primarily, they are used for their sonic "fit" into the music...Just my musings...
 monicap69 wrote:
takes me back to my first boyfriend in the 70s....


 



We heard you the first time :-)

OMG, did a station ID just intrude on the guitar fade out? On Radio Paradise? Sinful!
Holy Mind Numbing
Gods of PROG. Could anyone pull this off nowadays? and the final WURM movement...bliss
takes me back to my first boyfriend in the 70s....
 westslope wrote:
RIP Chris Squire.   

 
Sigh.  So sad.  He was amazing.  I have front row tickets for Anderson/Rabin/Wakeman later this year.  It would have been so much more magical if Chris was still with us and he joined the mini-reunion.
 Kenbob wrote:
I had at least 4 different 8 track tapes of this album because they wore out so fast from constant playing while we drove around the countryside outside my small Texas town smoking dope. Ah, the 70's.
 
Hopefully the tracks didn't switch during any cool guitar solos! (I hate when that happens.)
I had at least 4 different 8 track tapes of this album because they wore out so fast from constant playing while we drove around the countryside outside my small Texas town smoking dope. Ah, the 70's.
 westslope wrote:
Love the guitar work.  Both Steve Howe on lead and Chris Squire on bass were phenomenal.

RIP Chris Squire.   

 
Endorsed.
Chris Squire's bass playing is sooooo freaking good.

 
 LowPhreak wrote:

I think they stand up just fine. Song lyrics are a form of poetry, and metaphor and allegory are well-known literary devices.
 
Well said.
 Boy_Wonder wrote:
Love this.... many happy memories of the early 70's - but the lyrics don't stand up to examination these days!!

 
I think they stand up just fine. Song lyrics are a form of poetry, and metaphor and allegory are well-known literary devices.

45 years ago! Where has the time gone?
Love this.... many happy memories of the early 70's - but the lyrics don't stand up to examination these days!! "Sister Bluebird"!!

 
I. Life Seeker

Sister bluebird flying high above
Shine your wings forward to the sun
Hide the myst'ries of life on your way
Though you've seen them, please don't say a word
What you don't know, I have never heard

Starship trooper, go sailing on by
Catch my soul, catch the very light
Hide the moment from my eager eye
Though you've seen them, please don't tell a soul
What you can't see, can't be very whole

Speak to me of summer
Long winters longer than time can remember
The setting up of other roads
To travel on in old accustomed ways
I still remember the talks by the water
The proud sons and daughter 
That knew the knowledge of the land
Spoke to me in sweet accustomed ways

Mother life, hold firmly on to me
Catch my knowledge higher than the day
Lose as much as only you can show
Though you've seen me, please don't say a word
What I don't know, I have never shared

II. Disillusion

Loneliness is a power that we possess to give or take away forever
All I know can be shown by your acceptance of the facts there shown before you
Take what I say in a different way and it's easy to say that this is all confusion
As I see a new day in me, I can also show it you and you may follow

Speak to me of summer
Long winters longer than time can remember
The setting up of other roads
To travel on in old accustomed ways
I still remember the talks by the water
The proud sons and daughter 
That knew the knowledge of the land
Spoke to me in sweet accustomed ways
Love the guitar work.  Both Steve Howe on lead and Chris Squire on bass were phenomenal.

RIP Chris Squire.   
f-ing spaceships left me behind.
Ah, YES, that final movement, PROG BLISS
Yes promised much, but actually delivered very few great songs. This song is typical - 3.
  YESSS!! PSD'd the decemberists and got THIS.. {#Bananajumprope}
Just bought this on vinyl the other day.{#Drummer}


 old_shep wrote:
For me back then, Yes sang clearly of wonder and hope in a world up to its ears in social and geo-political conflict.  Things haven't changed. 

 
Yes, they have.  More countries have nuclear weapons.  And the world's population has not really dialled into the risks of the next regional nuclear war.  What the hell are we doing protecting Israel's nuclear weapons monopoly in the Mid-East?  Especially as the ethnic cleansing/nation building campaign continues.

On the bright side, a regional nuclear war would once and for all take care of the global climate change issue. 
 Relayer wrote:
Probably one of my top 5 songs of all time.  Amazing 3-part song that finishes with a masterful guitar segment. Yes was untouchable from 1971 - 1975 (well, maybe not Topographic Oceans).

 
Hilarious.  I agree; I thought Topographic Oceans sucked.  And during the period, Relayer was the very best.

I am amazed at how fresh and invigorating this still sounds. 
For me back then, Yes sang clearly of wonder and hope in a world up to its ears in social and geo-political conflict.  Things haven't changed. 
Probably one of my top 5 songs of all time.  Amazing 3-part song that finishes with a masterful guitar segment. Yes was untouchable from 1971 - 1975 (well, maybe not Topographic Oceans).
BRILLIANT ...... just brilliant!
 Stich wrote:
Perfect for a Friday afternoon !

 
Yup. Pass the bong please. 
Still makes my heart soar and the memories return in a flood taking me on a hundred paths connected by this jewel of a song... One of the first things a good friend showed me how to play on the Strat I used to have was the open C in here... Still seems like YESterday...
 Lindo525 wrote:
Some of the best times I will never remember happened while this album played!!

SOOOOOOO GOOD! 

 
Amen Lindo!
 jagdriver wrote:

I'm with you. Musically, their stuff is interesting. But I always found Jon Anderson's vocals to be so.foching.ANNOYING.

 
Me too, mainly because I could do a fairly good "McCartney" but a "Jon Anderson" would have required surgery.
On second thoughts, that would have avoided a butterfly effect or two.
 aspicer wrote:
Never gets old - simply brilliant!

 
Hear! Hear!

This is clearly one of my favourite early Yes songs.   Frankly, I believe that it holds up rather well.
Weird to hear something I used to listen to and loved as a teenager but until this moment had completely forgotten about for the last 40 years.
 fatcatjb wrote:
in the 70's I was an Allman Brothers loving budding slide guitarist, so it is no surprise that Yes did not catch my ear. I always admired what they did...and liked them on stage once, but just never my cup of tea. Too complicated for my simplistic sensibilities, I suspect
 
I'm with you. Musically, their stuff is interesting. But I always found Jon Anderson's vocals to be so.foching.ANNOYING.


Never gets old - simply brilliant!
 dragon1952 wrote:

Yep...if your tastes run towards pop and top 40 you certainly wouldn't hear anything like this let alone be able to appreciate the virtuosity and complexity of it.

 
All the "virtuosity and complexity" in the world does not automatically make good music. In the realm of rock music it can often come across as little more than smug adornment.  But go ahead and teach us all about music appreciation and higher culture.
 Lindo525 wrote:
Some of the best times I will never remember happened while this album played!!

SOOOOOOO GOOD! 

 

in the 70's I was an Allman Brothers loving budding slide guitarist, so it is no surprise that Yes did not catch my ear. I always admired what they did...and liked them on stage once, but just never my cup of tea. Too complicated for my simplistic sensibilities, I suspect
 
".... In sweet accustomed ways....."

thank you  .. such a delightful surprise to hear this today on Radio Paradise
A choice, very choice favorite ... 
 Ericocean wrote:
Radio Paradise is the only place I ever hear Yes, and it never fails to remind me what an annoying, terrible sound they had.  This song is painful.

 
Yep...if your tastes run towards pop and top 40 you certainly wouldn't hear anything like this let alone be able to appreciate the virtuosity and complexity of it.

Starship Trooper. Good book, good song and the film… Well two out of three isn’t bad!


 {#Clap}
LowPhreak wrote:


OK, so a song is "painful" now? I suggest you see a doctor...or grow up and stop using these stupid, trendy euphemisms.

 


 Ericocean wrote:
Radio Paradise is the only place I ever hear Yes, and it never fails to remind me what an annoying, terrible sound they had.  This song is painful.

 

OK, so a song is "painful" now? I suggest you see a doctor...or grow up and stop using these stupid, trendy euphemisms.
Starship Trooper, classic blast from the past! Thank you, i needed that!
{#Bananajam}Excellent live shows need emoticons for smoke and lasers...
Radio Paradise is the only place I ever hear Yes, and it never fails to remind me what an annoying, terrible sound they had.  This song is painful.
Perfect for a Friday afternoon !
Some of the best times I will never remember happened while this album played!!

SOOOOOOO GOOD! 
 Hannio wrote:
I like to follow Yes with some 3 chord rock and roll to cleanse the palate.

 
I know what you mean, yet the final section of this song IS three-chord rock and roll. It's just not the standard I IV V changes. 
 Lazarus wrote:
Everybody in my homeless camp loves this song, and The Yes Album...

Now I gotta wait til a "bad" song comes on to listen ... could be quite a wait 

 

What a great fn album!!! ...esp. wirh headphones
Everybody in my homeless camp loves this song, and The Yes Album...

 
This is one of those bands that I just never felt any kind of connection with.
Wore this album out, still love this music. 
 nagsheadlocal wrote:
Heading out at 4 a.m., surfboards on the roof rack, hoping there was something at Hatteras and blasting this into the eastern NC soybean fields. 

 
Hoping the music will kill the Monsanto soybeans !
One of my favorite songs when I was in College way back when.....still lovin' it!
I miss Rick Wakeman going wild on this at the end like on the live Yessongs album, but I know this studio version predates his joining the band. 
{#Bananajam}{#Dancingbanana_2}{#Notworthy}{#Clap}
 Ja300Mes wrote:

I find it difficult to comment only on this track. The Yes Album is one where I only listen to it from start to finish without interruption. It is a true masterpiece - every facet is perfect.



 
Ditto. Bill, how 'bout more from this ablum!!
This song is soooo phenomenal...  this whole album is incredible...  absolutely incredible...  love it all...
{#Kiss} ........ luv it
 westslope wrote:

Cranked up!  

For serious Yes fans, Steven Wilson's most recent CD is just as much a homage to Yes as it is a tribute to King Crimson.  

I hear Yes (Squire Bass, Howe lead) all over The Raven that Refused to Sing CD.  



 
First listen of the first song on The Raven, it struck me that this was Steve Wilson homage to Yes, KC, and Rush.  He's paid tribute to Pink Floyd many times before, but on The Raven I truly hear Yes.  

This is remains one of my favorite songs of all time.

I find it difficult to comment only on this track. The Yes Album is one where I only listen to it from start to finish without interruption. It is a true masterpiece - every facet is perfect.


it's easy to say that this is all confusion...
Enigmatic lyrics, connoting what? Knowledge of the land? Sweet accustomed ways?
What does one take away?
Got to love the bass line and that crescendo. 
There may have been as many weed-and-peyote-fueled conversations over this as any other track ever.  
 dig wrote:
Yes? No.

  yep. not down


That tune was way ahead of its time. At the time!  loved the long version most.
 
Yes? No.

Everybody in my mushrooming multitude of churches be dancing buck ass naked all over the world like bowlegged gypsy muleskinners...  I am grateful for the unbridled adulation from my avid readers...  love this song...  love this album...  love sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll...
Yes at the peak of their powers. 
 h8rhater wrote:

Says the bearer of bad views.

 
haha, good one. 
 nagsheadlocal wrote:
Heading out at 4 a.m., surfboards on the roof rack, hoping there was something at Hatteras and blasting this into the eastern NC soybean fields. 

 
that's a great picture you paint.
I like to follow Yes with some 3 chord rock and roll to cleanse the palate.
Starship Trooper takes me across time and space, like a several hour meditation session, or a toke used to at one point. A much needed journey today. Thanks for playing such liberating music. 
 RedTopFireBelow wrote:
We were allowed to bring music to our 8th grade art class and I brought The Yes Album.   I remember other students laughing at me because the thought the music was horrible but I loved it and still do.  A remarkable album for it's time. 


"it's easy to say that this is all confusion"... yes indeedie doo



{#Dancingbanana}   

 
Cool you have good memories and I do too, I have owned a couple Yes albums over the years and it would be ok with me if I never heard them again.
Me too!  Dallas Convention Center. 


   bobzane wrote:
I have become the guy who says "I saw Yes open for Tull in '71." May the gods have mercy on my soul.

Imaginative lyric, constantly changing meter, superb technical skills, badass drums, even more badass guitar, and you can dance to it if you really want to.  10 without a moment's hesitation.
My Hero, Steve Howe!
 anika200 wrote:
Really, I hate to be the bearer of bad news but this song is horrible. Lets move on.

 
Says the bearer of bad views.
We were allowed to bring music to our 8th grade art class and I brought The Yes Album.   I remember other students laughing at me because the thought the music was horrible but I loved it and still do.  A remarkable album for it's time. 


"it's easy to say that this is all confusion"... yes indeedie doo



{#Dancingbanana}   
Really, I hate to be the bearer of bad news but this song is horrible. Lets move on.
YES - I ENJOY ! Very much. This Song, the whole album, the Band accompanies me since I'm 13 years old. Yes and Genesis mean a lot to me.
 catnip wrote:
I used to be a great fan of Yes... but 25 years or more along the line I have to admit that apart from the most excellent instrumental outro, the rest of the song really is turgid crap.

I mean, honestly, utter rubbish. 

 
Yes, that´s true.{#Yes}
 bobzane wrote:
I have become the guy who says "I saw Yes open for Tull in '71." May the gods have mercy on my soul.

 
May the gods give you props.
Heading out at 4 a.m., surfboards on the roof rack, hoping there was something at Hatteras and blasting this into the eastern NC soybean fields. 
Hell Yes, Yes!

Cranked up!  

For serious Yes fans, Steven Wilson's most recent CD is just as much a homage to Yes as it is a tribute to King Crimson.  

I hear Yes (Squire Bass, Howe lead) all over The Raven that Refused to Sing CD.  


Favorite Yes song of all time.  Damn this rocks, especially the ending.
I recently downloaded the entire Yes discovery and had a Prog Rock weekend (much to the amusement of Mrs Poacher). 

I could not find any loons or tie die tshirts hidden in the wardrobe though.

However, it was interesting that I listened to a couple of Yes Albums I had not heard for over 40 years - and I found myself remembering the words. Compare that with sometimes not remembering where I parked my car. . . short term memory loss. . . must be something to do with the tea I am drinking or something. 

Anyway, this track in particular has been an anthem for me for most of my life and still hits the spot.

Hurrah for RP! 
 big stud Romeo Tuma wrote:


This is as good as it gets...  love this song, and this whole phenomenal album...



 
 

this song is marvelous...
 
 gjeeg wrote:
This was the start of The Shift.
Life changed.
1971.
Play it at my funeral too.
"Mother Life confirming unto me..."
Unexpected Genius.
(Was fortunate to see them live; November 1971. NYC Academy of Music. Blew the house away. Triple bill: with King Crimson and Procol Harem. I was seventeen years old.)
 
Would have loved to see that triple bill!  Sweet. 

Only managed to see King Crimson in Ottawa when Fripp was in his shredding wall-paper stage and I was unfamiliar with the music. 

 

For fans of the old King Crimson, please do give Steven Wilson's Raven that refused to sing CD a listen or two.


 kojiroh wrote:
I'm glad this is the long version, not the crap one that misses the most important part of the song.
 
exactly!