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Jackson Browne — Sing My Songs + For Everyman
Album: For Everyman
Avg rating:
6.8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 562









Released: 1973
Length: 9:28
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Everybody I talk to is ready to leave
With the light of the morning
They've seen the end coming down long enough to believe
That they've heard their last warning
Standing alone
Each has his own ticket in his hand
And as the evening descends
I sit thinking 'bout Everyman

Seems like I've always been looking for some other place
To get it together
Where with a few of my friends I could give up the race
And maybe find something better
But all my fine dreams
Well though out schemes to gain the motherland
Have all eventually come down to waiting for Everyman

Waiting here for Everyman--
Make it on your own if you think you can
If you see somewhere to go I understand
Waiting here for Everyman--
Don't ask me if he'll show -- baby I don't know

Make it on your own if you think you can
Somewhere later on you'll have to take a stand
Then you're going to need a hand

Everybody's just waiting to hear from the one
Who can give them the answers
And lead them back to that place in the warmth of the sun
Where sweet childhood still dances
Who'll come along
And hold out that strong and gentle father's hand?
Long ago I heard someone say something 'bout Everyman

Waiting here for Everyman--
Make it on your own if you think you can
If you see somewhere to go I understand

I'm not trying to tell you that I've seen the plan
Turn and walk away if you think I am--
But don't think too badly of one who's left holding sand
He's just another dreamer, dreaming 'bout Everyman
Comments (62)add comment
Beautiful chills listening to this.  Just like when I was listening to this when I was 16. 
Love this guys music so much I named my son after him. 
 klaasstap wrote:
It's funny, I like melancholic music, but I cannot get into Jackson Browne's sort. The music is good, well played, so I understand that it gets a 6.8 here, but I don't like it. I think it is his voice. Yes, tastes differ.
 
Fair do's. I love it, but to each their own, and thank you for being one of those rare RP posters who can express their opinion without taking a big dump all over the piece in question. 
I had a version of this album cover where, when you pulled out the inner sleeve, what was inside was exactly the same artwork except Jackson wasn't sitting in the chair.
Interesting.  I received a load of vinyl from a neighbour a few years ago and never really played them. Then I just noticed that this album was a part of that bunch. A lot of names backing JB on this, primarily the Eagles and Joni Mitchell. Perhaps I'll give the whole album a listen after all!
It's funny, I like melancholic music, but I cannot get into Jackson Browne's sort. The music is good, well played, so I understand that it gets a 6.8 here, but I don't like it. I think it is his voice. Yes, tastes differ.
 Proclivities wrote:

There has always been "genuine and sincere" music, and there still is - one just has to know where to look for it.  There are still great singer/songwriters around, but Jackson Browne never was one, in my opinion.  This song is tepid and lifeless to me, but I understand his appeal to a lot of folks.  Maybe part of the reason that a lot of the folks considered "great singer/songwriters either faded away or began producing inferior material" was just because they were getting older.  As disheartening as it can be, cynicism is a an eventual and reoccurring response in a culture such as ours; I wouldn't necessarily blame David Letterman for its popularity.
 
"There has always been "genuine and sincere" music, and there still is - one just has to know where to look for it."  Radio Paradise being a great place to start, IMHO!
 Grayson wrote:
Everyman... beating his wife black and blue for acting "crazy."
 
I don't get the reference.
I found the song turgid and flat but it fortunately improved towards the end (no PSD on Sonos). I recall liking JB in my teens to some extent but this doesn't do it for me now.
How many times do you think Jason Isbell has listened to this?
Everyman... beating his wife black and blue for acting "crazy." I cannot loathe Jackson Browne any more than I always have. 
Ever notice he has no vibrato? 
 kingart wrote:
He was a '70s product but this sound resonates as much as ever, 45 years later. 
 
Not a '70's product, a forever poet and musical master.  {#Pray}
 On_The_Beach wrote:
I hear ya. I relate Letterman's debut (circa '81) with the beginning of cynicism as mainstream entertainment on a large scale, which is about the time when all the great singer/songwriters either faded away or began producing inferior material. I love Letterman, don't get me wrong; popular culture needed a good poke in the ribs and Dave provided that on a nightly basis, but it wasn't long before everybody and their dog was aping Letterman and soon it seemed like everything was a parody of something previous because to be genuine and sincere simply wasn't cool anymore.
So yes, hats off to Jackson Browne whose first 4 albums were all instant classics, written in a time when expressing emotion wasn't an invitation to ridicule.
Music that brings you up and down at the same time. Feeling good about feeling sad.  Mr. Browne is one of the few that are truly fine at doing that.  A mystery how it works like that. He was a '70s product but this sound resonates as much as ever, 45 years later. 
His first three albums were just superb.  
 ScottN wrote:
I'm a dreamer too, but this song does not seem to have aged well.  JB tries too hard to be "profound", imo.

  A very early album. Try "For A Dancer" "Sky Blue and Black" and "Don't You Wanna Be There" for effortless, masterful profundity.
 

precisely steeler {#Clap}    we'll get it back
 steeler wrote:
Jackson Browne's songs bring me back to a simpler time, a time that was more pure and freshly ideological, more hopeful, most just- at least in my mind and soul.  That is the gift he brings. Especially this one. When I saw  him in concert last summer, ,he brought me and others in attendance back to that place, back to that mindset, through the cobwebs and over the mental and emotional roadblocks.  It is bittersweet.  The feelings welling up inside are real and positive, oh so positive.  Yet, it is a bit sad because I wonder where and when those feelings began to seemingly evaporate into thin air.  To connect again with those hopes (and fears) and inner truths is magical. The truths remain, buried deep perhaps, but still there.  Jackson Browne unearths them, mining a deep and rich vein.  The imagery is simple yet powerful. Same with the plea. Eternal.  

Somewhere deep inside, I'm still that dreamer. 
  I'm a dreamer too, but this song does not seem to have aged well.  JB tries too hard to be "profound", imo.


 Proclivities wrote:
There has always been "genuine and sincere" music, and there still is - you just have to know where to look for it.  There are still great singer/songwriters around, but Jackson Browne never was one, in my opinion.  This song is tepid and lifeless to me - like dishwater.  Maybe part of the reason that a lot of the folks considered "great singer/songwriters either faded away or began producing inferior material" was just because they were getting older.  As disheartening as it can be, cynicism is a an eventual and reoccurring response in a culture such as ours; I wouldn't necessarily blame David Letterman for its popularity.
 
I'm definitely not blaming Letterman for the popularity of cynicism in popular culture; I'm blaming all his lazy & unimaginative imitators; Leno and so on. "Hey, Dave seems cool; let's just do what he does (only not as well)." And no, I don't really think there's any causal link between cynicism as entertainment and the decline of the singer/songwriter era, just an interesting coincidence. As for the song, I love it, you don't; ain't nothin' wrong with that.

 On_The_Beach wrote:

I hear ya. I relate Letterman's debut (circa '81) with the beginning of cynicism as mainstream entertainment on a large scale, which is about the time when all the great singer/songwriters either faded away or began producing inferior material. I love Letterman, don't get me wrong; popular culture needed a good poke in the ribs and Dave provided that on a nightly basis, but it wasn't long before everybody and their dog was aping Letterman and soon it seemed like everything was a parody of something previous because to be genuine and sincere simply wasn't cool anymore.
So yes, hats off to Jackson Browne whose first 4 albums were all instant classics, written in a time when expressing emotion wasn't an invitation to ridicule.

 
There has always been "genuine and sincere" music, and there still is - one just has to know where to look for it.  There are still great singer/songwriters around, but Jackson Browne never was one, in my opinion.  This song is tepid and lifeless to me, but I understand his appeal to a lot of folks.  Maybe part of the reason that a lot of the folks considered "great singer/songwriters either faded away or began producing inferior material" was just because they were getting older.  As disheartening as it can be, cynicism is a an eventual and reoccurring response in a culture such as ours; I wouldn't necessarily blame David Letterman for its popularity.
Jackson Browne's songs bring me back to a simpler time, a time that was more pure and freshly ideological, more hopeful, most just- at least in my mind and soul.  That is the gift he brings. Especially this one. When I saw  him in concert last summer, ,he brought me and others in attendance back to that place, back to that mindset, through the cobwebs and over the mental and emotional roadblocks.  It is bittersweet.  The feelings welling up inside are real and positive, oh so positive.  Yet, it is a bit sad because I wonder where and when those feelings began to seemingly evaporate into thin air.  To connect again with those hopes (and fears) and inner truths is magical. The truths remain, buried deep perhaps, but still there.  Jackson Browne unearths them, mining a deep and rich vein.  The imagery is simple yet powerful. Same with the plea. Eternal.  

Somewhere deep inside, I'm still that dreamer.  

.


I got a bit of flame for a comment I made against JB on another song, so I'll be careful.  This one doesn't remind me of Captain and Tennielle.  It just reminds me of someone whining, droning.  I'm sure that there are lyrics.  The music does not help me hear them.

On the other post, I was accused of being too young...  I was born in January '63 (as the flamer could have seen by looking at my profile).
I remember when this dreck came out, and I hated it then.  No, I do not hate "thoughtful, soulful, poetic music".  I loved Simon and Garfunkel, I even liked Joan Baez.  Jackson Browne is a pale, tasteless shadow of those singers/songwriters.  Bleh.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

I hear ya. I relate Letterman's debut (circa '81) with the beginning of cynicism as mainstream entertainment on a large scale, which is about the time when all the great singer/songwriters either faded away or began producing inferior material. I love Letterman, don't get me wrong; popular culture needed a good poke in the ribs and Dave provided that on a nightly basis, but it wasn't long before everybody and their dog was aping Letterman and soon it seemed like everything was a parody of something previous because to be genuine and sincere simply wasn't cool anymore.
So yes, hats off to Jackson Browne whose first 4 albums were all instant classics, written in a time when expressing emotion wasn't an invitation to ridicule.
 
It's not the content, it's the general whiny-ness that irritates me. Each to his own...
 lmic wrote:
From back when irony hadn't yet become the cultural currency, and earnestness was valued. Man I miss those days. 8
 
I hear ya. I relate Letterman's debut (circa '81) with the beginning of cynicism as mainstream entertainment on a large scale, which is about the time when all the great singer/songwriters either faded away or began producing inferior material. I love Letterman, don't get me wrong; popular culture needed a good poke in the ribs and Dave provided that on a nightly basis, but it wasn't long before everybody and their dog was aping Letterman and soon it seemed like everything was a parody of something previous because to be genuine and sincere simply wasn't cool anymore.
So yes, hats off to Jackson Browne whose first 4 albums were all instant classics, written in a time when expressing emotion wasn't an invitation to ridicule.

yep, not old, is so good that is ageless. It is forever.

 
CMax wrote:
Nina Simone - I Shall Be Released   ==>    
Simon & Garfunkel - Mrs. Robinson   ==>    
The Byrds - All I Really Want To Do   ==>  
Solas - Dignity   ==>  
Ian Brown - Time Is Everything   ==> 
Calexico - Sirena   ==>  
Bob Marley - Forever Loving Jah  ==> 
Jackson Browne - For Everyman   ==>  
Pops Staples - World In Motion   ==>  
War - Slippin' Into Darkness   ==>  
Benise - Samba Samba   ==>  
Super Furry Animals - Moped Eyes   ==>  
Mazzy Star - I've Been Let Down   ==>  
Antje Duvekot - Dandelion   ==>  
Bob Dylan - Tangled Up In Blue.  

how old is this play list from 2009??
 


Never having heard this song before or not remembering if I had, I was thinking the building drums near the end was another excellent Bill style of transition.
Something to work on Bill. 
Mopey. And boring.
Sorry guys - yes there is a lot of similarity in his songs but the music and lyrics are damn good...he could write a tune...
 Randomax wrote:

probably remastered

 


I hope so. I always felt that the original vinyl sounded murky. This is a wonderful album none the less.
 Cruzan wrote:
My god, how many identical songs with different titles did he make?
Folks must like the lyrics or something. His melodies and sound are beyond bland.........

 
Agreed, sounds like a drippy Eagles out-take (oh wait, didn't Jackson Browne used to write for them?)

At least Pop Staples is next, and Dylan Tangled up in Blue a little later on

Nina Simone - I Shall Be Released   ==>    
Simon & Garfunkel - Mrs. Robinson   ==>    
The Byrds - All I Really Want To Do   ==>  
Solas - Dignity   ==>  
Ian Brown - Time Is Everything   ==> 
Calexico - Sirena   ==>  
Bob Marley - Forever Loving Jah  ==> 
Jackson Browne - For Everyman   ==>  
Pops Staples - World In Motion   ==>  
War - Slippin' Into Darkness   ==>  
Benise - Samba Samba   ==>  
Super Furry Animals - Moped Eyes   ==>  
Mazzy Star - I've Been Let Down   ==>  
Antje Duvekot - Dandelion   ==>  
Bob Dylan - Tangled Up In Blue.  

how old is this play list from 2009??


 Tana wrote:
Is this the original recording from the For Everyman album? It's so much richer and more complex than I remember it.

 
I have the original vinyl and also the CD recorded (as closely as possible) from the analog recording.  This currently-playing version sounds like it's been digitally-remastered to within an inch of its life.

Makes me want to hear the ORIGINAL recording (with "Sing My Songs to Me" preceding it and seguéing into "For Everyman.")

Yes, I'm a purist.  You got a problem with that? {#Mrgreen}
hey...take it easy =:)
My god, how many identical songs with different titles did he make?
Folks must like the lyrics or something. His melodies and sound are beyond bland.........

 Tana wrote:
Is this the original recording from the For Everyman album? It's so much richer and more complex than I remember it.

 
probably remastered

 artsygal wrote:
Yes, more Jackson Browne, please!!!  His music is ageless, and like others here have posted, sadly overlooked. I saw his concert several years ago when it was just him and his guitars/piano with no band. He still sounded wonderful.
 
Saw him just a few months ago at Bass Concert Hall @ Univ of Texas.....just him and guitars and piano....he's so personable, played non-stop except for a mid-way break, played anything anyone cried out....he was perfect, a consumate professional and still so poignant....his voice finally gave out after the 3rd hour....what a guy!


Yes, more Jackson Browne, please!!!  His music is ageless, and like others here have posted, sadly overlooked. I saw his concert several years ago when it was just him and his guitars/piano with no band. He still sounded wonderful.
Is this the original recording from the For Everyman album? It's so much richer and more complex than I remember it.

This would have been ever-so-much better had it included the song immediately before it ("Sing My Songs to Me") from which "For Everyman" segués.  It's a seamless transition, unlike this truncated version of the song.  Still, I love Jackson Browne, and this song (with our without its lead-in) is a 10. {#Sunny}
Also, find him doing "Here Come Those Tears Again" on youtube. He must be about 26 or so. Great vid and song.
Just came to comment - cuz I love this guy so much. And just saw my comment from June! Ah...still feel the same way.
loved him since early 70's. very wise. transports me to high school. how do these musicians write such meaningful lyrics? and melodies?
lengthy{#Headache}
Ah, the cure for the reggae lecture we just suffered. Sincere, well intentioned and peaceful music from a time when we tried to be those things. Thank you.
 lmic wrote:
From back when irony hadn't yet become the cultural currency, and earnestness was valued. Man I miss those days. 8
 

Indeed.

Plaintive pleas. Profound.

Long ago I heard someone say something about everyman.

Don't ask me if he'll show.  Baby, I don't know. 

From back when irony hadn't yet become the cultural currency, and earnestness was valued. Man I miss those days. 8
One of my favorite albums. All the songs are memorable. And he always worked w/the best musicians. Ah, good times....


Pretty ho-hum for Jackson Brown....He has much better stuff
We need a Jackson Browne renaissance. He isn't nearly popular enough, considering the quality of his work.

"I'm not trying to tell you that I've seen the plan.
Turn and walk away if you think I am."
 cherinoel wrote:
SF Listener - no, he was 21 in 1969 —-remember Pretender album?
 
JB's birthday was October 9, 1948, but the song/album was "Running on Empty":

In '69 I was 21 and I called the road my own
I don't know when that road turned onto the road I'm on
Running on - running on empty


Ho-hum from bar 4, I'm afraid {#Sleep}
omg

More Jackson, please.
He has a wealth of remarkable music, that RP, sadly, has been overlooking...

Looking East, 
World in Motion,
The Pretender....

Come on...!
I love the live version of this song from the Secret Policeman's Other Ball.
 element1 wrote:


Yes, but that would actually be the Running on Empty album...

 

Well, okay that album with Pretender on it where he explains he was 21 in 1969....my bad
 cherinoel wrote:
SF Listener - no, he was 21 in 1969 —-remember Pretender album?
 

Yes, but that would actually be the Running on Empty album...


SOOOO long overdue on RP.  My goodness.
SF Listener - no, he was 21 in 1969 —-remember Pretender album?
His best album IMHO....ah, those were the daze my friend
Not my favorite JB songg, but it's always good to hear his voice.
come watch jackson browne perform for a very small crowd every year at www.steelbridgesongfest.org.  A music festival for songwriters, and the wonderful way they all make us feel...............
What, is he like 21 here?
This was/is the album that I listen to when I want to delve into introspection.

Probes deep and mines a rich vein.