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The Moody Blues — Visions Of Paradise
Album: In Search Of The Lost Chord
Avg rating:
7.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 764









Released: 1968
Length: 4:10
Plays (last 30 days): 1
The sounds in my mind just come to me
Come see, come see
And the call of her eyes makes waterfalls
Of me, of me

In the garden of her love I'll stay awhile
To be, to be
What the seeds of her thoughts once mean to me
Come see, come see

Visions of paradise, cloudless skies I see
Rainbows on the hill, blue onyx on the sea
Come see, ah, ah, ah

And the sounds in my mind just come to me
Come see, come see
And the call of her eyes, makes waterfalls
Of me, of me
Comments (129)add comment
 versalog wrote:

Certainly less than lively, but really must be listened to in the flow and context of the album.
 
So true for most of the Prog Rock bands....only time to get up is when you have to flip the LP to Side 2....This one's at an 8 for me...Long Live RP!!
Does NOT get any better than Moody Blues!
So glad to hear there was something there besides "Nights in White Satin".  I like this one.
 unclehud wrote:
PS:  The song that caused me to reconsider?  Your Wildest Dreams?  You can find the video on the internet.

Three and a half minutes of steaming garbage, and I am utterly convinced the Moody Blues were a pop-song band that decided to piggyback on a lot of the hallucinogenic atmosphere of the time.
 
Well in that you would be wrong.
geez, I'm a geezer,  known this for 50 years
HOW could you forget "Days of Future Passed"? A favorite!

 unclehud wrote:
Giselle62 wrote (on May 28, 2010):
To those of you who love Psychedelic music; is this album considered good (if cheesy?)  Or really too dated and cheesy for most people to like?
 I can stand some datedness and sort of liked the "OM" song I heard yesterday in the coffeshop. Hadn't heard most of this before.
  
Giselle62, I love psychedelic music, psychedelic art, and all the psychedelic accouterments that accrue to a curious mind that went through teenage during the late 60s and early 70s.

Honestly, at the time, The Moody Blues weren't "seriously out there" music; not like King Crimson, the Doors, Yes, Paul Winter Consort, or a few others.  Their music was (and still is) pretty acceptable to most listeners.  There was a stigma that attached to performers that were successful, and the Moody Blues were quite successful.  So -- yes, I considered the Moodies to be poseurs at prog-rock or space rock, and disliked them fiercely, except when they played in my girlfriend's car.  (She liked them a LOT.)  

Nowadays, I can see how the "psychedelic" label gets quickly attached to them: synthesizers, soaring vocals, lyrics that suggest mind-altering drugs were used in their compositions and cover art.  And it's true, their art includes all those characteristics, and the band had the rare combination of inspiration,technical ability, cohesiveness, and that elusive quality that can take an idea and convert it into music and lyrics.

In 1986, they released a single named "Your Wildest Dreams" that hit MTV at a time when my life was in serious turmoil.  Made me reassess their early efforts and I purchased a few of their LPs.  If you're interested, I'd recommend In Search of the Lost Chord (where you can find this song) and On the Threshold of a Dream as starters.  Threshold's entire second side is 20-25 minutes of music woven into a continuous theme.
 

Wonderful,just wonderful .......Connecticut :o) 
PS:  The song that caused me to reconsider?  Your Wildest Dreams?  You can find the video on the internet.

Three and a half minutes of steaming garbage, and I am utterly convinced the Moody Blues were a pop-song band that decided to piggyback on a lot of the hallucinogenic atmosphere of the time.
Giselle62 wrote (on May 28, 2010):
To those of you who love Psychedelic music; is this album considered good (if cheesy?)  Or really too dated and cheesy for most people to like?
 I can stand some datedness and sort of liked the "OM" song I heard yesterday in the coffeshop. Hadn't heard most of this before.
  
Giselle62, I love psychedelic music, psychedelic art, and all the psychedelic accouterments that accrue to a curious mind that went through teenage during the late 60s and early 70s.

Honestly, at the time, The Moody Blues weren't "seriously out there" music; not like King Crimson, the Doors, Yes, Paul Winter Consort, or a few others.  Their music was (and still is) pretty acceptable to most listeners.  There was a stigma that attached to performers that were successful, and the Moody Blues were quite successful.  So -- yes, I considered the Moodies to be poseurs at prog-rock or space rock, and disliked them fiercely, except when they played in my girlfriend's car.  (She liked them a LOT.)  

Nowadays, I can see how the "psychedelic" label gets quickly attached to them: synthesizers, soaring vocals, lyrics that suggest mind-altering drugs were used in their compositions and cover art.  And it's true, their art includes all those characteristics, and the band had the rare combination of inspiration,technical ability, cohesiveness, and that elusive quality that can take an idea and convert it into music and lyrics.

In 1986, they released a single named "Your Wildest Dreams" that hit MTV at a time when my life was in serious turmoil.  Made me reassess their early efforts and I purchased a few of their LPs.  If you're interested, I'd recommend In Search of the Lost Chord (where you can find this song) and On the Threshold of a Dream as starters.  Threshold's entire second side is 20-25 minutes of music woven into a continuous theme.
 thewheedle wrote:
My brother and I saw the Moody Blues back in the 80's. The Fixx was opening up for them. There were 2 younger girls sitting in front of us and asked us who the Moody Blues were. We told them they should stick around and find out.

 
Judge Smails
Just listen, breathe. Repeat.
From Wikipedia:

The Moody Blues are an English rock band formed in Birmingham, England in 1964. They first came to prominence playing rhythm and blues music, but their second album, Days of Future Passed, which was released in 1967, was a fusion of rock with classical music and established them as pioneers in the development of art rock and progressive rock. It has been described as a "landmark" and "one of the first successful concept albums".
...

The 1968 follow-up LP, In Search of the Lost Chord included "Legend of a Mind", a song written by Ray Thomas in tribute to LSD guru Timothy Leary which encompassed a flute solo performed by Thomas – four members of the group had taken LSD together at the start of 1967. A promotional film for the song was filmed on location at Groot-Bijgaarden Castle near Brussels in Belgium. Lodge provided a two-part song "House of Four Doors" set either side of Thomas' epic piece. Justin Hayward began playing sitar and incorporating it into Moody Blues music ("Voices...", "Visions of Paradise", "Om", etc.), having been inspired by George Harrison. Hayward's "Voices in the Sky" charted as a single in the UK (No. 27), as did Lodge's "Ride My See-Saw" (No. 42, No. 15 in France) – still their concert finale number – which featured Pinder's non-album song "A Simple Game" as the 'B' side. Pinder's "The Best Way to Travel" was another high point, as was his closing song "Om" (sung by Pinder and Thomas, again featuring Hayward on sitar). Graeme Edge found a significant secondary role in the band as a writer of poetry, and some of their early albums from the late 1960s began with various band members reciting poems by Edge that were conceptually related to the lyrics of the songs that followed. Edge narrated his brief "Departure" poem on "Lost Chord", although Pinder recited the majority of Edge's poetry, as according to Edge, he had the best voice for it due to smoking more cigarettes and drinking more whisky at the time.
Welcome to the Rock N Roll hall of fame.

 
 Giselle62 wrote:
To those of you who love Psychedelic music; is this album considered good (if cheesy?)
Or really too dated and cheesy for most people to like?
 I can stand some datedness and sort of liked the "OM" song I heard yesterday in the coffeshop. Hadn't heard most of this before.

 
This is an excellent record.  Of course it's "dated" (what isn't?).  That, and the quality of the music, is why many people still buy and listen to this record regularly.  Thank goodness most people restrict the use of "dated" as a descriptor of dairy products and cold cuts.  However, some people cease to listen to music simply because it's "dated" and are unfortunately homeless (musically).  
It never gets old, for sure.  Love the Moodys!!
{#Cheers} never gets old
 robh wrote:
I'm sorry but this is deary.

 
Certainly less than lively, but really must be listened to in the flow and context of the album.
From one of the best albums of that decade; there were so many. {#Yes}
Sublime! {#Pray}
Prog rock—when the term was brand new. Go, Ray, on flute.

 
These guys should definitely be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
 coding_to_music wrote:
These guys are SO copying My Morning Jacket  {#Beat}
(just 40 years earlier)
 

Hmm...did not go far enough back in time.
Beautiful 

Touches of My Morning Jacket, anyone?


 whomhow wrote:
Nice, but not great - a bit out of date... 6.

 
Out of date??? 
This is way to close to a Genisis song in the playlist for my comfort.  I can deal with these prog songs in isolation, but not when they come in waves.
I love the flute in this song.  Thank you Bill.
A seminal album 11+
 Ground breaker when it debuted-10+
Early Genesis to early Moody Blues. Thanks for the trip down memory lane, Bill.


Awsm movie - nice song
Nice, but not great - a bit out of date... 6.
My favorite Moody Blues Album.  If I could rate it an 11, I would
{#Heartkiss}  Trippy Man
Mellotron come to carry me home.
 jmsmy wrote:
One of the first pioneers of Progressive Rock.

Come on Cleveland put them into the RnR Hall Of Fame

 

I agree!  The Moodies are long overdue for their induction in the Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame!
 mrgus wrote:
My sister liked "Go Now" so in '69 for her b-day I bought her "In Search...", not having heard the album. She hated it and gave it back to me. As an 18 year old whose main musical influence were Beach Boys and Motown-it changed my musical life(also influenced some of my extracurricular activities)..
 

Your sister returned a birthday gift...???

Pfff....!


So nice to hear this today!
 robh wrote:
I'm sorry but this is deary.
 
Yes, it is certainly deary.
My brother and I saw the Moody Blues back in the 80's. The Fixx was opening up for them. There were 2 younger girls sitting in front of us and asked us who the Moody Blues were. We told them they should stick around and find out.
My sister liked "Go Now" so in '69 for her b-day I bought her "In Search...", not having heard the album. She hated it and gave it back to me. As an 18 year old whose main musical influence were Beach Boys and Motown-it changed my musical life(also influenced some of my extracurricular activities)..
One of the first pioneers of Progressive Rock.

Come on Cleveland put them into the RnR Hall Of Fame
I'm sorry but this is deary.
 Giselle62 wrote:
To those of you who love Psychedelic music; is this album considered good (if cheesy?)
Or really too dated and cheesy for most people to like? 

The Moodys aren't really psychedelic, though they include aspects. They were a category unto themselves- art rock, progressive, bits of classical...

Their double album This Is The Moody Blues is outstanding, picking up cool tunes from their major albums and streaming them together. I listened to it a lot for about ten years, though I don't currently own a copy, for what that's worth. I don't think "cheesy" when I hear tracks from it, but "pretentious" comes to mind occasionally. 

Saw them live a couple years ago in Oakland, CA. It was a good show, if somewhat low-energy. 

 Cynaera wrote:
I think most people who were listening to progressive rock in the 70's (and earlier!) have their own special Moody Blues memory. Mine is of staying at a friend's house temporarily while I looked for a job and tried to decide what to do with my life after California.  She had shelves and shelves of books - everything from archaeology to the complete hardbound collection of Harlan Ellison.  I spent a lot of time reading, drinking Café Vienna (her decadence of choice) and listening to the Moody Blues.  Brief but good memories of that time...

And I still love the Moodies. I think I appreciate them more than ever, now that I'm in my fifties and have heard a wealth of other music that can't even come close to what they accomplished in their tenure.

I honestly don't know how I'd survive this life without music in it... {#Sunny}
 


I'm a little younger, so I didn't get the MB until I hit college in 1987. My old roommate turned me on to them. We used to stay up in our dormroom at night, pouring over her vinyl, album covers and MB lyrics. I fell in love with Justin Hayward. Time stood still. Magic days of good friendship, poetry, writing and music. Life was good...
 isayhoomhom wrote:
I saw the Moodys in 1989 at the Mann in Philadelphia and it was one of the few truly awful shows I've seen. Weak...anemic...with two dippy background vocalists singing Nights in White Satin as if it were a Britney Spears tune. John Lodge played about every other note of his original bass lines. Sad and disappointing.

And I really like their old albums.
 


You saw them on an off night. I've seen them three times...in CT, MA and NC. They were always magic...
By the way, I used to live in Newtown. Hello, neighbor!

Everything that Fleet Foxes wishes they could be. . . but sadly, can only simulate, albeit quite poorly. . . 


Very nice set there, Bill: Habib Kolte, then this, and then follow it with "Bread and Wine" by Cowboy Junkies.
Love this piece and wish that Bill would allow it to extend into the segue to "the Actor" - one of my favourite Moody Blues songs that is not often played anywhere.

I think most people who were listening to progressive rock in the 70's (and earlier!) have their own special Moody Blues memory. Mine is of staying at a friend's house temporarily while I looked for a job and tried to decide what to do with my life after California.  She had shelves and shelves of books - everything from archaeology to the complete hardbound collection of Harlan Ellison.  I spent a lot of time reading, drinking Café Vienna (her decadence of choice) and listening to the Moody Blues.  Brief but good memories of that time...

And I still love the Moodies. I think I appreciate them more than ever, now that I'm in my fifties and have heard a wealth of other music that can't even come close to what they accomplished in their tenure.

I honestly don't know how I'd survive this life without music in it... {#Sunny}
To those of you who love Psychedelic music; is this album considered good (if cheesy?)
Or really too dated and cheesy for most people to like?
 I can stand some datedness and sort of liked the "OM" song I heard yesterday in the coffeshop. Hadn't heard most of this before.
My Dad is like the biggest Moody Blues fan... he was playing them for us one night and my wife said, "they're pretty dramatic". He disagreed... later that night on PBS, there they are, the whole orchestra, Royal Albert Hall, Ride My See Saw, WOW, very cool, I almost peed my pants! We chuckle every time we hear a MB song... any band that uses a gong, I think it's safe to say there is some drama. Thanks Dad!

I saw the Moodys in 1989 at the Mann in Philadelphia and it was one of the few truly awful shows I've seen. Weak...anemic...with two dippy background vocalists singing Nights in White Satin as if it were a Britney Spears tune. John Lodge played about every other note of his original bass lines. Sad and disappointing.

And I really like their old albums.
Saw some of the Albert Hall concert on IPTV last week.  The guys still sound great!
The best! Definitely one of my desert island albums.
    ...memories, nice memories, sad memories, soft memories, sounds of a summer afternoon in the countryside, grey days of rain trying to learn not knowing why, breathless bicycle rides against the wind, moments of eternity, visions of Paradise - I was listening to this song constantly - no mp3 player at that time, just the natural device call ... memory

Trippy
Blimey Bill - are you having a Hippy Moment or what?  First Genesis    then this.

Anyway, we are going to see these guys later this year - bet the average age of the audience will be around 60! 
Just listened to this album last week (on vinyl).  Parts of it are indeed dated, but a lot of it still sounds great, and timeless.  This is one of those songs.
classic rp-sad,sweet,spooky-ethereal?
A rarely heard gem from a truly Classic Album.  Notice that I refer to it as an "Album".  Back in the day, that's all there was - Vinyl.  Scratchy & organic.  Funny that format has become vogue again.  Everthing old is new again.  :-)

I needed this today...thanks Bill.
No one has a voice like Justin Haywood. His voice, the beautiful melodies, and instrumentation always take me THERE!

Wow, a double header. Yesterday to today. Two Moodys' from In 'Search Of the Lost Chord'. My all time favorite album from my youth. Thanks Bill!!!



As someone stated previously - Visions of Radio Paradise. {#Daisy}
Love the Moodys'
Possibly my favorite song from this outstanding album.  Such musical range!
 gjeeg wrote:
Raie your hand if you tripped to this....
 
     I raise both hands and feet!{#Bananasplit}
My favorite album of all time!

(Hand up)
      WHAT ?
          {#Arrowd}
These guys are SO copying My Morning Jacket  {#Beat}
(just 40 years earlier)

 greengarden wrote:

Isn't he dead?...

No no, He's outside looking in.
 
Actually, he was orbiting the planet until he and Gene Roddenberry's ashes burned up upon reentry a couple of years ago.
 lwilkinson wrote:

Other than their very first album which was pretty bad and the solo stuff after their split, I've always been of the opinion that it's actually very difficult to play any "single" song off any album.  It's always seemed easier to start and play the vinyl all the way start to finish since the album is like a book.  The first chapter sets the mood, the middle chapters hook you in and the last chapter/song completes it.

  
i don't know about the Moody Blues' first album and the "solo stuff" (yet!), but lwilkinson gives a good image/analogy of what i think was the musicians' intention—every song seems to build on but differ from the one before it. . . i recall fellow DJs on my college radio station expressing your attitude—that
"the album is like a book.  The first chapter sets the mood, the middle chapters hook you in, and the last chapter/song completes it."
Raise your hand if you tripped to this....
 jagdriver wrote:
RIP, Dr. Tim

You too, Ken



No they're outside, looking in.

 


Rare, lost gem treasure.
Wow.
Back there.... way back there.
Leave it to RP!
Visions of Radio Paradise! I have said it before,say it again,I love The Moodies!{#Yell}
{#Meditate}
 OperaNrocks wrote:
I guess it's my day to be a fly in the ointment but this is the first song of theirs I can recall putting me to sleep.  Honestly, I've loved so much of their music for so long it amazes me that this one is a complete snooze.....
 
It must have been an incredible dream!!   {#Sleep}

Lullaby, and good night,
With pink roses bedight
OperaNrocks wrote:
 Please play any other song but this one.


So it is written, so it shall be done. {#Lol}

 OperaNrocks wrote:
I guess it's my day to be a fly in the ointment but this is the first song of theirs I can recall putting me to sleep.  Honestly, I've loved so much of their music for so long it amazes me that this one is a complete snooze.  I didn't even recognize the band when I first heard it.  Please play any other song but this one.

 
Other than their very first album which was pretty bad and the solo stuff after their split, I've always been of the opinion that it's actually very difficult to play any "single" song off any album.  It's always seemed easier to start and play the vinyl all the way start to finish since the album is like a book.  The first chapter sets the mood, the middle chapters hook you in and the last chapter/song completes it.

 OperaNrocks wrote:
I guess it's my day to be a fly in the ointment but this is the first song of theirs I can recall putting me to sleep.  Honestly, I've loved so much of their music for so long it amazes me that this one is a complete snooze.  I didn't even recognize the band when I first heard it.  Please play any other song but this one.

 
I was a big fan of theirs way back when, but I think this track sounds like a self-parody.


break out your flute and lets skip to the gay hobbits mushroom house in the woods!..sheezuz!!!!
RIP, Dr. Tim

You too, Ken



 mandolin wrote:
...so i thought i was hearing a new fleet foxes track!..
 

The Moody Blues recently noted Fleet Foxes as a major influence...{#Wink}

I guess it's my day to be a fly in the ointment but this is the first song of theirs I can recall putting me to sleep.  Honestly, I've loved so much of their music for so long it amazes me that this one is a complete snooze.  I didn't even recognize the band when I first heard it.  Please play any other song but this one.

Yes, that was a sitar.  Love it!

 
Tana wrote:

Oh my yes. Didn't even recognize it at first. Do I hear a sitar?

 


 hippiechick wrote:
Always nice to hear the Moodies!

{#Meditate}
 

And the word is "Om" . . . {#Meditate}
 catal wrote:
How lovely.....long time since I heard this!  Thanks.
 
Oh my yes. Didn't even recognize it at first. Do I hear a sitar?

How lovely.....long time since I heard this!  Thanks.
...so i thought i was hearing a new fleet foxes track!..
They are timeless, Days of Future Past as a whole is one of the best albums—that sweet trippy quality
 
toehead wrote:

They were and still are ahead of there time.


 


Awesome album art... Love The Moody Blues and RP!!! {#Daisy}
Always nice to hear the Moodies!

{#Meditate}

They were and still are ahead of there time.


Dire!


 jagdriver wrote:

Excellent CD! ...Timothy Leary...


 
Isn't he dead?...

No no, He's outside looking in.

 Cy wrote:
Lost Chord... one of my favorite albums to take "on the bus" back in the day. :D

 
Too true. A trip it was.

rbigelo wrote:
I've never heard this Moody Blues tune before and it is FABULOUS!


same her and agreed!

HomeGreauxn wrote:
RP never ceases to amaze me. Great to hear some old MB!
Roger that, friend!
I've never heard this Moody Blues tune before and it is FABULOUS! :music:
This is why I love RP. You can expect the unexpected.
A song I haven't heard in years. Always a surprise to find that you can still remember the lyrics and the chord changes after such a long time.
I forgot about this tune - most excellent.
daveturnley wrote:
Would make for a great daytripping tune.
Yes, it did.
Would make for a great daytripping tune.
Loved them since I heard 'Tuesday Afternoon' soon after its release.
I'd like to buy a mellatron on ebay for about $20...I'd start my own band.
such a great great album :meditate:
M.B. always the coolest cover,
There's no other group quite like Moody Blues!
Cy wrote:
Lost Chord... one of my favorite albums to take "on the bus" back in the day. :D
Kool-Aid, anybody?
Excellent CD! ...Timothy Leary...
Beautiful
wow, I forgot I like this. wicked cool. really does have that 60-something acid head feel about it. lovely.
Love anything by the Moody Blues-haven't heard this in a while. Thanks RP
RP never ceases to amaze me. Great to hear some old MB!
This is off my favorite MB album! Love it. Great stuff! :clap:
Originally Posted by curtisls: Way beyond most people's intellect or spirit. And that's a good thing. We all need things to which we aspire.
Not too elistist, are we. Man, this is really dated. (Lots of stuff from the past does not transport well)