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Yes — I've Seen All Good People
Album: The Yes Album
Avg rating:
7.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 844









Released: 1971
Length: 6:46
Plays (last 30 days): 0
'''I. Your Move'''

I've seen all good people turn their heads each day
so satisfied I'm on my way
I've seen all good people turn their heads each day
so satisfied I'm on my way

Take a straight and stronger course
to the corner of your life
Make the white queen run so fast
she hasn't got time to make you a wife

'Cause it's time is time in time with your time and
its news is captured... for the queen to use!
Move me on to any black square
Use me anytime you want
Just remember that the goal
Is for us all to capture all we want
(Move me on to any black square)

Don't surround yourself with yourself
Move on back two squares
Send an instant karma to me
Initial it with loving care
(Don't surround yourself)

'Cause it's time is time in time with your time and
its news is captured... for the queen to use!

Diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit didda
Diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit didda
(Don't surround yourself with yourself)

Don't surround yourself with yourself
(Don't surround yourself)
Move on back two squares
Send an instant karma to me
(Send an instant karma to me)
Initial it with loving care
(Don't surround yourself)

'Cause it's time is time in time with your time and
its news is captured... for the queen to use!

Diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit didda
(All we are saying)
Diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit didda
(Is give peace a chance)
Diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit didda
(All we are saying)
Diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit didda
(Is give peace a chance)

'Cause it's time is time in time with your time and
its news is captured...


'''II. All Good People'''

I've seen all good people turn their heads each day
So satisfied I'm on my way

I've seen all good people turn their heads each day
So satisfied I'm on my way

''(repeat)''
Comments (235)add comment
get out of your mom's basement
This song squeezes my gizzards every time I hear it...  love it... love this entire album to this day...  love sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll...
I don't think you have to drop to your knees and confess ("CONFESS, brothah!"—Fred, this applies to you) that you liked, lionized even, prog rock before punk brought you (indeed an entire culture) to your senses. It was what it was, at time excessive, and at times transcendent, like this extended bit of indulgence. But once you sort of poke past all the excesses that prog came to represent, you find amazing musicianship and a sense of cohesiveness to the composition. Overblown? Maybe. But I find this one eminently listenable today, and, folks, I was an avowed destroyer of all things prog back then. You learn; you grow.
Recognize the history and importance of this song but I'd be fine if I never heard it again.
Yes is one of the groups that I really respect but have never been able to make a personal connection with. Owner of a Lonely Heart and Love Will Find a Way might be the exceptions. I've never spent a cent on Yes but they can groove.
 fredriley wrote:

"hobbit-rock" - nice one! {#Roflol}{#Clap} I wish I'd coined that phrase.

Back in the day (that'll be the decadent progrock early 70s, before punk exploded all pretentions with its rude and necessary vitality) I and my pretentious mates at college were into ELP, Yes, Gong, Amon Duul and similar. I used to dream of appearing on stage with Keith Emerson and playing synth riffs. I wrote ELP on school desks, quoted their lyrics, expounded on their musical virtuosity, and generally though that they were the dog's bollox. Which I suppose they were at the time, but virtually nothing of theirs is now listenable to by any other than the nostalgic. A couple of Greg Lake songs, and that's about it. Albums like Brain Salad Surgery are as distinctive markers of their time as fossils are in determining the age of rocks.

I could no more listen to ELP now than stick needles in my ears, and that applies tenfold to the execrable Yes (if Yes is the answer, you're asking the wrong question). I don't look back on my tastes in the 70s with disgust or shame - that was a different time, I was a different person, and progrock was a necessary antidote to the social turmoil of Britain at that time. I enjoyed ELP and Yes then, as did many others. Even though we knew in our hearts that the lyrics were gnomically meaningless, the 20-minute tracks hideously overblown, and the baroque synth solos from Wakeman and Emerson plain self-indulgent noodling, we revelled in it. However, that was then, this is now. Some artists' work (eg Hendrix, Floyd, Clapton, Kraftwerk) straddles the decades and will still be listened to for decades to come, some is specific to its time.

 

Hendrix, Floyd, Clapton . . . Kraftwerk?

YES!


brilliant..  love it...
 




 fredriley wrote:

"hobbit-rock" - nice one! {#Roflol}{#Clap} I wish I'd coined that phrase.

Back in the day (that'll be the decadent progrock early 70s, before punk exploded all pretentions with its rude and necessary vitality) I and my pretentious mates at college were into ELP, Yes, Gong, Amon Duul and similar. I used to dream of appearing on stage with Keith Emerson and playing synth riffs. I wrote ELP on school desks, quoted their lyrics, expounded on their musical virtuosity, and generally though that they were the dog's bollox. Which I suppose they were at the time, but virtually nothing of theirs is now listenable to by any other than the nostalgic. A couple of Greg Lake songs, and that's about it. Albums like Brain Salad Surgery are as distinctive markers of their time as fossils are in determining the age of rocks.

I could no more listen to ELP now than stick needles in my ears, and that applies tenfold to the execrable Yes (if Yes is the answer, you're asking the wrong question). I don't look back on my tastes in the 70s with disgust or shame - that was a different time, I was a different person, and progrock was a necessary antidote to the social turmoil of Britain at that time. I enjoyed ELP and Yes then, as did many others. Even though we knew in our hearts that the lyrics were gnomically meaningless, the 20-minute tracks hideously overblown, and the baroque synth solos from Wakeman and Emerson plain self-indulgent noodling, we revelled in it. However, that was then, this is now. Some artists' work (eg Hendrix, Floyd, Clapton, Kraftwerk) straddles the decades and will still be listened to for decades to come, some is specific to its time.
 
Fredriley, your post contains one or two common threads found in a lot of entries here, such as "when does a band or a genre become a nostalgia act?". 

Some music aims to be in the here and now and doesn't care about grand themes or musical traditions. It just wants to explode and tear away the mainstream bullshit that's built up. Once its time is past, it doesn't work as a nostalgia act. 
Rebellion has to take ever new forms if it wants stay fresh and current. Once punk's time was up, we eventually moved onto grunge in response to heavy metal metal hair bands and arena rock. 

Do you want your music to always be new, do you want it tied to some musical tradition? I'm pretty sure that we all want a mix but it's always interesting to hear how someone's musical tastes have changed over time. RPers are always going to be debating this matter. There's no right answer. 

Personally, I wonder from time to time whether there'll be classic punk or rap anthologies, and whether anyone will buy them. I can't listen to punk-only Webstations for very long—it's loud and angry and messy and then it gets really tiresome. I'd probably get quickly fed up with prog-rock stations as well.  

I don't look back on my tastes in the 70s with disgust or shame - that was a different time, I was a different person, and progrock >was a necessary antidote to the social turmoil of Britain at that time. 

Would love to read more of what you have to say about that time in the UK and how it affected music. I've heard that the British version of the TV series "Life on Mars" really captured that period in the country. 

Never really liked this group.
 cohifi wrote:
Much better than Rush!
 
So is a poke in the eye with a sharp stick!
(But yes, I like Yes.)

 lemmoth wrote:


More proof of your cluelessness.
 

Wow. Just wow. I didn't realize someone's opinion of a song had something do with their level of knowledge. This is music not physics equations.{#Rolleyes}

 fredriley wrote:
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'... I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s...
Does that mean you think they are eminently effable nowdays?


 Cynaera wrote:

{#Lol}  Your joy is contagious - I am SO loving hearing this song! We're about to get a foot of snow, I have three litterboxes to clean, all the critters are tucked in for the night, the bills are paid, we're going to get a dishwasher either repaired or replaced, the rototiller is in the shop, and it seems that life has finally cut us a break or two.  I wish peace and contentment to everyone at RP.

Thank you for this song, whoever uploaded it.  {#Daisy}
 


Oh, Yes... hearing this made the whole evening... love it... thank you...



 romeotuma wrote:


I am so happy to hear this song!  Love it!!!!


 
{#Lol}  Your joy is contagious - I am SO loving hearing this song! We're about to get a foot of snow, I have three litterboxes to clean, all the critters are tucked in for the night, the bills are paid, we're going to get a dishwasher either repaired or replaced, the rototiller is in the shop, and it seems that life has finally cut us a break or two.  I wish peace and contentment to everyone at RP.

Thank you for this song, whoever uploaded it.  {#Daisy}
Much better than Rush!
Live YES in the round. 2 hits of ——.
I forget it like it was yesterday.........
But it makes every 7th grade chess club geek with glasses happy{#Smile}

this was more profound after a few joints

I love this!
 Proclivities wrote:
fredriley wrote:
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'. The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating these days, though I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s. Yes were one of the main reasons that punk kicked off as it did in reaction to puffed-up bands touring the country in lorry convoys carried shedloads of kit and playing pretentious cobblers. In that sense Yes were a good thing, but in all other senses they should be left buried in the dustbin of history with ELP and the others of that generation. 1 from the Nottingham jury, and that's being generous.
  It's amazing how someone who speaks ill of this band and/or song is dismissed as a "moron" or a "fool". Since when is hindsight not a way to judge music, culture or anything else? There are countless examples throughout one's life of having something seem like "the coolest sh*t in the world" at one time and then coming to the realization that it really wasn't.  I'm not sure why "music supposed to be about feel in real time" either: that would seem to invalidate anything but live performances (maybe I'm just misinterpreting that sentence).
  I understand that this band is/was important to a lot of folks here, and that's great, but there's a lot of stuff I listened to in the 1970's that I can't listen to anymore - particularly this sort of "hobbit-rock".

 
I must agree with both of you that this type of music seems dated now, but I LOVE HOBBIT ROCK!  (and love that moniker!)

I personally believe prog rock will becomemore accepted with, much like opera or Butoh dance {ducks and runs for cover}

 Greyjoca wrote:
Hey Bill, I'm pretty disappointed you didn't play the Wurm part of this song. Bummin me out man.
 


You are thinking of the song Starship Trooper from the same album, that had the incredible instrumental climax "Wurm" at the end. Starship Trooper is one of my all time favorites.
 GINRUSH wrote:
After all these years, I am just finding the  hidden lyrics, " All we are saying .... is give peace a chance"  in this tune.....cool
 


There are 2 Lennon references in this song; in addition to what you hear, they also use the phrase "instant karma" in the verses.


I am so happy to hear this song!  Love it!!!!




 sirdroseph wrote:
This is one of those prerequisite sing along to songs and let me tell you to all of those around me, this is not good, but this song sure is......{#Cheers}
Edit: I was just listening to ShawBlades cover of this this morning, it is very good as well!
 

More proof of your cluelessness.
 fredriley wrote:

"hobbit-rock" - nice one! {#Roflol}{#Clap} I wish I'd coined that phrase.

Back in the day (that'll be the decadent progrock early 70s, before punk exploded all pretentions with its rude and necessary vitality) I and my pretentious mates at college were into ELP, Yes, Gong, Amon Duul and similar. I used to dream of appearing on stage with Keith Emerson and playing synth riffs. I wrote ELP on school desks, quoted their lyrics, expounded on their musical virtuosity, and generally though that they were the dog's bollox. Which I suppose they were at the time, but virtually nothing of theirs is now listenable to by any other than the nostalgic. A couple of Greg Lake songs, and that's about it. Albums like Brain Salad Surgery are as distinctive markers of their time as fossils are in determining the age of rocks.

I could no more listen to ELP now than stick needles in my ears, and that applies tenfold to the execrable Yes (if Yes is the answer, you're asking the wrong question). I don't look back on my tastes in the 70s with disgust or shame - that was a different time, I was a different person, and progrock was a necessary antidote to the social turmoil of Britain at that time. I enjoyed ELP and Yes then, as did many others. Even though we knew in our hearts that the lyrics were gnomically meaningless, the 20-minute tracks hideously overblown, and the baroque synth solos from Wakeman and Emerson plain self-indulgent noodling, we revelled in it. However, that was then, this is now. Some artists' work (eg Hendrix, Floyd, Clapton, Kraftwerk) straddles the decades and will still be listened to for decades to come, some is specific to its time.

 
OK Fred - I often disagree with your comments here on RP, and ELP is my wife's favorite band of all time and............I couldn't have said it better — You are 100% accurate

 Proclivities wrote:
  It's amazing how someone who speaks ill of this band and/or song is dismissed as a "moron" or a "fool". Since when is hindsight not a way to judge music, culture or anything else? There are countless examples throughout one's life of having something seem like "the coolest sh*t in the world" at one time and then coming to the realization that it really wasn't.  I'm not sure why "music supposed to be about feel in real time" either: that would seem to invalidate anything but live performances (maybe I'm just misinterpreting that sentence).
  I understand that this band is/was important to a lot of folks here, and that's great, but there's a lot of stuff I listened to in the 1970's that I can't listen to anymore - particularly this sort of "hobbit-rock".

 
"hobbit-rock" - nice one! {#Roflol}{#Clap} I wish I'd coined that phrase.

Back in the day (that'll be the decadent progrock early 70s, before punk exploded all pretentions with its rude and necessary vitality) I and my pretentious mates at college were into ELP, Yes, Gong, Amon Duul and similar. I used to dream of appearing on stage with Keith Emerson and playing synth riffs. I wrote ELP on school desks, quoted their lyrics, expounded on their musical virtuosity, and generally though that they were the dog's bollox. Which I suppose they were at the time, but virtually nothing of theirs is now listenable to by any other than the nostalgic. A couple of Greg Lake songs, and that's about it. Albums like Brain Salad Surgery are as distinctive markers of their time as fossils are in determining the age of rocks.

I could no more listen to ELP now than stick needles in my ears, and that applies tenfold to the execrable Yes (if Yes is the answer, you're asking the wrong question). I don't look back on my tastes in the 70s with disgust or shame - that was a different time, I was a different person, and progrock was a necessary antidote to the social turmoil of Britain at that time. I enjoyed ELP and Yes then, as did many others. Even though we knew in our hearts that the lyrics were gnomically meaningless, the 20-minute tracks hideously overblown, and the baroque synth solos from Wakeman and Emerson plain self-indulgent noodling, we revelled in it. However, that was then, this is now. Some artists' work (eg Hendrix, Floyd, Clapton, Kraftwerk) straddles the decades and will still be listened to for decades to come, some is specific to its time.

 westslope wrote:
Question:  I hear Wakeman on the keyboards, Squire on bass, Howe on lead guitar.  Who is playing the second guitar?  
 

Not Wakeman, is Tony Kaye on keyboard

Is the one with broken foot on the sleeve cover photo

 





I want to hear this song right now....

 
 westslope wrote:
Question:  I hear Wakeman on the keyboards, Squire on bass, Howe on lead guitar.  Who is playing the second guitar?  
 
No, who is on first.

Question:  I hear Wakeman on the keyboards, Squire on bass, Howe on lead guitar.  Who is playing the second guitar?  
I love that moment when the pipe organ comes in. I imagine myself sitting in a big cathedral playing this across five keyboards, flipping my long grey hair out of my eyes
Noooooooo.
These guys had such an impact on music back then - I just love early Yes.  {#Sunny}
This is one of those prerequisite sing along to songs and let me tell you to all of those around me, this is not good, but this song sure is......{#Cheers}
Edit: I was just listening to ShawBlades cover of this this morning, it is very good as well!


Yessss...  just cranked the volume wayyyy up...  love it...

 
Hey Bill, I'm pretty disappointed you didn't play the Wurm part of this song. Bummin me out man.
After all these years, I am just finding the  hidden lyrics, " All we are saying .... is give peace a chance"  in this tune.....cool
I love it when these gems suddenly appear. Makes me want to go and play the album.
I still have this on a 45.

Black round plastic thing with a big hole in the center.
Played on a turntable (record player)

{#Dancingbanana_2} I'm back in high school . . . "Hey, don't Bogart that, man . . . pass it on down!"

Click.


absolutely fantastic...  love it...


I used to think this was two different songs.  The serious contemplative song with just Jon Anderson then the dancy song with the guitar riff.

{#Bananajam}{#Bananajam}{#Bananajam}{#Dancingbanana}




love it...


 lostintokyo wrote:
this song did not stand the test of time
 
I think you accidentally left out the last two very necessary words in your post - "for me". Or perhaps you meant "except for those with no taste"? But, of course, how could anyone (aside from Bill, as programmer in chief) disagree with you? Absurd.

I really liked this band early on, even if they couldn't pen a coherent lyric. Just amazingly good musicians, really inventive. Trying to please the masses is what ruined them, I think.
{#Motor}           {#Motor}          {#Motor}
this song did not stand the test of time


This song is soooo good for the ears...


 holborne wrote:
Bleh. Bombastic crap.
 

Yay! Bombastic crap!
fredriley wrote:
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'. The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating these days, though I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s. Yes were one of the main reasons that punk kicked off as it did in reaction to puffed-up bands touring the country in lorry convoys carried shedloads of kit and playing pretentious cobblers. In that sense Yes were a good thing, but in all other senses they should be left buried in the dustbin of history with ELP and the others of that generation. 1 from the Nottingham jury, and that's being generous.

 radiozep wrote:
Thanks for the negative moronic input... Made me load up my song list with Yes. You 'used' to think that they were the 'pearls of ineffable wisdom', yet know you dismiss them now?? Isn't music supposed to be about feel in real time? If it sounded fresh and beyond your years then, give it some credit. Thank God they and others stretched the bounderies of music. First impressions are raw, and usually truthful. Anything can get outdated after massive play, so I guess you were either a fool then or a fool now, but 20/20 hindsight is no way to judge music.
 
  It's amazing how someone who speaks ill of this band and/or song is dismissed as a "moron" or a "fool". Since when is hindsight not a way to judge music, culture, or anything else? There are countless examples throughout one's life of having something seem like "the coolest sh*t in the world" at one time and then coming to the realization that it really wasn't.  I'm not sure why "music is supposed to be about feel in real time" either: that would seem to invalidate anything but live performances (maybe I'm just misinterpreting that sentence).
  I understand that this band is/was important to a lot of folks here, and that's great, but there's a lot of stuff I listened to in the 1970's that I can't listen to anymore - particularly this sort of "hobbit-rock".

my very 1st progressive rock album bought in '75...I still love it!
thanks Steve!...(my big brother)
 romeotuma wrote:


This is as good as it gets...
 

I agree with myself— this song is seminal...


This makes me feel like I've ate too much.....
...i've had this song stuck in my head all morning, in fact even lamented that i didn't own the CD to listen i drove in to work - thanks, bill!..
Yes any time!
 jagdriver wrote:
{#Arghhh} We're hearing these guys WAY too often as of late....
 
Hmmm, looks like the last time this was played was February.  I feel your pain.  Whenever it's a song I don't like, it FEELS like they play the damn thing every day!!!

That said, I love this song....

{#Arghhh} We're hearing these guys WAY too often as of late....


This is a GREAT song...


I have always adored Yes, particularly before they went all POP on us (i.e. Owner of a Lonely Heart)....

This is probably my favorite of all their albums!  LOVE the pipe organ.

 vaiodon wrote:
This last page worth of comments really made me laugh - thanks to all the post-ers especially those who have vague and augmented memories.

I've never been a big abuser of mind altering drugs, alcohol is bad enough, but a course of heavy painkillers for a 40-something's back problem a couple of years ago really did take take me to a mellow place.

As to the music: Yes have their moments, I loved that track on Going for the One where Rick recorded the organ in some Swiss/French church. But, yes, I can see how a trip helps it all digest....

And, yes I'm enjoying a drink just now. Why not?

 

There was alot of that church organ on that record. I am a big Yes fan and know the album well. About 15 yrs ago I had the good fortune to travel to Switzerland. I looked up that church in a town called Vevey. It was a tiny church with a rather large and stately pipe organ upstairs above the altar. It was a little surreal for me for a moment or two.

 
 rolland69 wrote:
Someone probably already said it, but when i was younger i thought this was a Rush song.... but it's all good.
 
I have known the music of "Yes" since the early 1970's when I listened repeatedly to "Close to the edge". I have since heard enough of "Rush" to know the difference. While the music of "Yes" degraded in later years, music by "Rush" clearly is not "all good" in comparison. {#Snooty}


This last page worth of comments really made me laugh - thanks to all the post-ers especially those who have vague and augmented memories.

I've never been a big abuser of mind altering drugs, alcohol is bad enough, but a course of heavy painkillers for a 40-something's back problem a couple of years ago really did take take me to a mellow place.

As to the music: Yes have their moments, I loved that track on Going for the One where Rick recorded the organ in some Swiss/French church. But, yes, I can see how a trip helps it all digest....

And, yes I'm enjoying a drink just now. Why not?

 songbirdfemme wrote:

 
peter_james_bond wrote:
Yes....I like this Yes song. Time for a drink {#Drunk}
 

Good LORD me too
 
Cheers!

 
peter_james_bond wrote:
Yes....I like this Yes song. Time for a drink {#Drunk}
 

Good LORD me too
Yes....I like this Yes song. Time for a drink {#Drunk}
I fell in love with the Ovation because of Yes.
What a miracle these guys are.
1970
The Golden Time.
This album is unparalleled.
{#No}   MUTE


Love it...


Someone probably already said it, but when i was younger i thought this was a Rush song. (like in my early teens) now that I older i can recognize the differnce mostly by the Chicago like riff at the end where the beat, tone, and even instruments chagne up. given that this song is Pre-'hard to say i'm sorry/get away' i would say that Chicago did a more Yes-like switch up... but it's all good.


Double-barrel orange, eh?

According to a Carleton Univ. chemistry student I met, it was 40% mescaline and 60% LSD.  The guy who played 3rd clarinet beside me in the high school band did some (against everybody's advice) and went into a series of convulsions at 9:30 a.m. after walking into music class.  Came close to ODing he did.

As the resident high school radical activist (I was so non-violent, polite and cooperative, it bordered on ridiculous) I helped the principal find a sample for the doctors.

So I did a full hit at a later date and better chosen time and venue.  Good stuff!   But not for everybody, especially for those with known metabolism and similar problems.

 

Still love Yes.

 



ACK!!!!  ACK ACK ACK!!!!!!
F*ckin'   ACK!!!!!
Seriously?  How many times ya gotta modulate just to prove you can do it?

{#Frustrated}
 healyf52 wrote:
Yes kicked ass in the 70's. I saw them at a midnight show at New York's Academy of Music in January of 1972. They played for over 4 hours and completely blew everybody's minds to smithereens.

I dropped one half of a four-way Orange Barrel about an hour prior to the show and was peaking about an hour into their set. It was a life altering experience for me.

We wobbled out of there at 5am happily stunned by their performance. It was literally earth shaking. I'll never forget their splendid musicianship. Chris Squire was wearing thigh-high leather boots and nearly shook the place apart with his thundering bass lines. Steve Howe was at his peak, his mercurial and edgy lines running around Squires bass. Rick Wakeman playing was astonishing and Jon Anderson sang like an Angel.
 

Jeez, those orange barrels were supposed to be 4-way, we used to pop em two or three at a time.  Of course we'd be flying for 24+ hours.  Used to hit a show Fri evening,  college football game Sat afternoon and another show Sat evening, coming down by early Sun am and sleeping all day.  So I must admit all those groups I liked in the 70's were seen and heard under the influence. However, I still enjoy listening to them, Yes included.  But I really like listening to RP because they've opened my ears to lots of new music, most of which I like.
Just a Fabulous album!
Not my favorite song indeed...
{#Bananajam}     Good Stuff (a bit dated, but still good R&R).
All I know is it makes me smile. That's really all I need. {#Sunny}
 veegez wrote:
 
So, Yes fans are worshipping a false god, or something like that?  Ok.  That would assume your low opinion of Yes is the "correct" opinion.  Which is stupid.
 

BZZZZZT!!! Sorry, good try, but no. Your consolation prize is a free course: Logic and Critical Thinking 101. Good luck!
 Hannio wrote:


Let's see. Fredriley posts up a heretical opinion of Yes, and

radiozep calls him a moron and a fool,
cafortier calls him self-righteous,
rtrudeau calls him (along with Brits in general)insufferable, self-righteous, egomaniacal know-it-all

This leads me to believe that Yes fans are every bit as intolerant as punks. Maybe because the object of their worship is so worthy of derision, and they know it?

  
So, Yes fans are worshipping a false god, or something like that?  Ok.  That would assume your low opinion of Yes is the "correct" opinion.  Which is stupid.


Bleh. Bombastic crap.


This is as good as it gets...


Hannio wrote:
Let's see. Fredriley posts up a heretical opinion of Yes, and radiozep calls him a moron and a fool, cafortier calls him self-righteous, rtrudeau calls him (along with Brits in general)insufferable, self-righteous, egomaniacal know-it-all This leads me to believe that Yes fans are every bit as intolerant as punks. Maybe because the object of their worship is so worthy of derision, and they know it?
Smack! I love the Austin people on RP.
bronorb wrote:
I like what you say about punks all dressing the same, acting the same, same disdain for popular things. Henry Rollins said once that punks were the most intolerant group ever.
Let's see. Fredriley posts up a heretical opinion of Yes, and radiozep calls him a moron and a fool, cafortier calls him self-righteous, rtrudeau calls him (along with Brits in general)insufferable, self-righteous, egomaniacal know-it-all This leads me to believe that Yes fans are every bit as intolerant as punks. Maybe because the object of their worship is so worthy of derision, and they know it?
fredriley wrote:
...The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating....
That may be an apt description, but irritating? I guess I just don't listen to The Yes with a view to understanding what the lyrics mean. Cryptic prose, like some James Joyce, can irritate me that way, but music? It's not much different from them singing it in Swahili -- it's a good song even if I can't understand it.
Get the idea cross around the track Underneath the flank of Thoroughbred racing chasers. Getting the feel as a river flows. Would you like to go and shoot the mountain masses? And here you stand no taller than the grass sees. And should you really chase so hard, The truth of sport plays rings around you.
The Yes, "Going for the One" (opaque, sure, but still a really good song IMHO)
countyman wrote:
those who don't recognize history are bound to repeat it. the music of the 70's was what it was. if you didn't live it you can't comment on it. just be thankful that it happened.
I sure hope you don't comment on Bach or Mozart.
radiozep wrote:
Thanks for the negative moronic input... Made me load up my song list with Yes. You 'used' to think that they were the 'pearls of ineffable wisdom', yet know you dismiss them now?? Isn't music supposed to be about feel in real time? If it sounded fresh and beyond your years then, give it some credit. Thank God they and others stretched the bounderies of music. First impressions are raw, and usually truthful. Anything can get outdated after massive play, so I guess you were either a fool then or a fool now, but 20/20 hindsight is no way to judge music.
excellent argument!
whining
those who don't recognize history are bound to repeat it. the music of the 70's was what it was. if you didn't live it you can't comment on it. just be thankful that it happened.
fredriley wrote:
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'. The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating these days, though I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s. Yes were one of the main reasons that punk kicked off as it did in reaction to puffed-up bands touring the country in lorry convoys carried shedloads of kit and playing pretentious cobblers. In that sense Yes were a good thing, but in all other senses they should be left buried in the dustbin of history with ELP and the others of that generation. 1 from the Nottingham jury, and that's being generous.
Fred gets it exactly right.
...more yes, please...
Ahhh, I love to show my age. Yes! Quite a gear shift from Zero 7.
Memeories..Just make me stop and listen
healyf52 wrote:
Yes kicked ass in the 70's. I saw them at a midnight show at New York's Academy of Music in January of 1972. They played for over 4 hours and completely blew everybody's minds to smithereens. I dropped one half of a four-way Orange Barrel about an hour prior to the show and was peaking about an hour into their set. It was a life altering experience for me. We wobbled out of there at 5am happily stunned by their performance. It was literally earth shaking. I'll never forget their splendid musicianship. Chris Squire was wearing thigh-high leather boots and nearly shook the place apart with his thundering bass lines. Steve Howe was at his peak, his mercurial and edgy lines running around Squires bass. Rick Wakeman playing was astonishing and Jon Anderson sang like an Angel.
Forgotten Yesterdays (Yes concert archive) There aren't any comments or reviews up for this show, you should add yours. dctrpunda wrote:
This was a do or die album for them, Atlantic told them to make a sellable album or they would drop them. Relative to their more recent stuff where they sold out completely, this has a nice balance of showing off thier talents and trying to achieve some sales
Adding Steve didn't hurt either.
This was a do or die album for them, Atlantic told them to make a sellable album or they would drop them. Relative to their more recent stuff where they sold out completely, this has a nice balance of showing off thier talents and trying to achieve some sales
healyf52 wrote:
...I dropped one half of a four-way Orange Barrel...
:roflol: Jeesuz. Peaking at a 4 hour Yes show sounds seriously memorable. I listened to them blissfully enough through the 70's not even knowing what the hell you just said.
rtrudeau wrote:
Thank you for answering the question: are Brits insufferable, self-righteous, egomaniacal know-it-alls? YES!
That's rich! :ass:
Takes me back, this one does! :cheesygrin:
fredriley wrote:
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'. The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating these days, though I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s. ... blah blah blah ...
Thank you for answering the question: are Brits insufferable, self-righteous, egomaniacal know-it-alls? YES!
Yes kicked ass in the 70's. I saw them at a midnight show at New York's Academy of Music in January of 1972. They played for over 4 hours and completely blew everybody's minds to smithereens. I dropped one half of a four-way Orange Barrel about an hour prior to the show and was peaking about an hour into their set. It was a life altering experience for me. We wobbled out of there at 5am happily stunned by their performance. It was literally earth shaking. I'll never forget their splendid musicianship. Chris Squire was wearing thigh-high leather boots and nearly shook the place apart with his thundering bass lines. Steve Howe was at his peak, his mercurial and edgy lines running around Squires bass. Rick Wakeman playing was astonishing and Jon Anderson sang like an Angel.
fredriley wrote:
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'. The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating these days, though I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s. Yes were one of the main reasons that punk kicked off as it did in reaction to puffed-up bands touring the country in lorry convoys carried shedloads of kit and playing pretentious cobblers. In that sense Yes were a good thing, but in all other senses they should be left buried in the dustbin of history with ELP and the others of that generation. 1 from the Nottingham jury, and that's being generous.
Thanks for the negative moronic input... Made me load up my song list with Yes. You 'used' to think that they were the 'pearls of ineffable wisdom', yet know you dismiss them now?? Isn't music supposed to be about feel in real time? If it sounded fresh and beyond your years then, give it some credit. Thank God they and others stretched the bounderies of music. First impressions are raw, and usually truthful. Anything can get outdated after massive play, so I guess you were either a fool then or a fool now, but 20/20 hindsight is no way to judge music.
fredriley wrote:
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'. The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating these days, though I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s. Yes were one of the main reasons that punk kicked off as it did in reaction to puffed-up bands touring the country in lorry convoys carried shedloads of kit and playing pretentious cobblers. In that sense Yes were a good thing, but in all other senses they should be left buried in the dustbin of history with ELP and the others of that generation. 1 from the Nottingham jury, and that's being generous.
do you really talk like the way you write? good grief. Lighten up Francis! :moon: Oh By the way. this is a good song. on the radio too much but its a good song from a very good album.
fredriley wrote:
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'. The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating these days, though I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s. Yes were one of the main reasons that punk kicked off as it did in reaction to puffed-up bands touring the country in lorry convoys carried shedloads of kit and playing pretentious cobblers. In that sense Yes were a good thing, but in all other senses they should be left buried in the dustbin of history with ELP and the others of that generation. 1 from the Nottingham jury, and that's being generous.
:ass: that's appropriate for your self-righteous diarrhea of the mouth.
WTF is all this about punk? Why can't there be room for both? People talk about punk like a bunch of skinny angry heroin-addled youths called each other up all on the same day and say "let's get these blighters with some simplistic shout-fests! That'll show 'em!" and then *POOF* punk was born. That's just not true. Maybe marketers and critics want you to think that, but punk, like art rock or prog or anything else, was informed by what came before. Sex Pistols did not appear on the earth from outer space. They listened to older records by bands they liked and were influenced by them, like anyone else at any other time in music history.
idheitmann wrote:
Yes!
NO
A band that really attempted positive themes. I really can't think of another one like them, in any time.
Yes!
fredriley wrote:
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'. The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating these days, though I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s. Yes were one of the main reasons that punk kicked off as it did in reaction to puffed-up bands touring the country in lorry convoys carried shedloads of kit and playing pretentious cobblers. In that sense Yes were a good thing, but in all other senses they should be left buried in the dustbin of history with ELP and the others of that generation. 1 from the Nottingham jury, and that's being generous.
tell me how you really feel...
Yes are perhaps the most egregious, stereotypical, and now seriously dated example of egocentric self-important 'pomp rock'. The lyrics in particular, with their cod Eastern philosophy and sheer impenetrability are astonishingly irritating these days, though I and my mates used to think that they were pearls of ineffable wisdom back in the early 70s. Yes were one of the main reasons that punk kicked off as it did in reaction to puffed-up bands touring the country in lorry convoys carried shedloads of kit and playing pretentious cobblers. In that sense Yes were a good thing, but in all other senses they should be left buried in the dustbin of history with ELP and the others of that generation. 1 from the Nottingham jury, and that's being generous.
Amazed at all the posts about punk, etc. Anyway, this is a great tune from a great band - takes me back to high school. Remember seeing them in Long Beach in the late 70's in the round - great set up it was! As for punk - it's for punks ! and they are too shallow to understand this music.
crinky wrote:
...excruciatingly dull, plodding Led Zeppelin in 1978. After enduring Bonham's 20-minute drum solo ...
The self abuse had started to catch up to Bonham by then. If you can lay your hands on the two DVD Zep set, the drum solo on there (from 1970) is a tour de force. But that's what happened ... by 78 the bloat had set in for a lot of the old guard like Zep and Yes. I personally like both Yes (pre-bloat) and the Pistols --- "Bollocks" is overlooked for what it is, which is a great rock album.
heyjoe3577 wrote:
I like your thoughts here. I don't like Punk because of a Punk roommate I had (he was the "drummer" in his band - they were awful and they loved being awful) who would always have his crew of punk friends crash at the house on weekends. They were all real cool people, funny as hell, fun to party with, but they were ALL THE SAME. Same clothes, same hair, same disdain for anything mainstream or popular. I was the most unique person there, and yet they might have only thought a few of my records, tapes or cd's were worth listening to. I've never had any prog musicians pass out drunk at my house, so I don't have much to say bout them. I like some Yes, some ELP, some Supertramp, but only some. And I do like some punk, but its the popular stuff, so I guess it doesn't really count.
I like what you say about punks all dressing the same, acting the same, same disdain for popular things. Henry Rollins said once that punks were the most intolerant group ever. If a song went longer than 3 minutes, they hated you. If your hair was too long or too short, you were shunned. How can anything new come out of that? The best bands of the punk era broke out of their punk chains and piercings and went on to something new. The rest faded away and became a parody of themselves. IMHO.
So sa-ti-sFIED…. Nails on a blackboard. I'm old enough to remember this when it came out and I loathed it then too. Though I think the musicianship is decent.
radioparadisehead wrote:
Ugh... Yes and Santana so close... I feel like I should be out on my cigarette boat, crimped mullet flowing through the air, high-hipped, one-piece bathing suit-wearing blonde at my side, neon shorts on, Gold's Gym tank top pulling back in the wind, smiling, and thinking how great it's going to be to watch Magnum P.I. tonight.
Magnum P.I.! Right on!
Well - I like it YES!
NO!
Oh no, Yes! I seem to remember this one sounding a bit different...
beelzebubba wrote:
You know, some hack reporter for Rolling Stone magazine or somewhere wrote an article and described 'punk' as the natural 'answer' to the 'overblown pretention' of prog of the 70's, and people have latched onto his quote and have been repeating it like lemmings ever since, without really thinking about how smart the original quote was in the first place. Let's examine the notion that 'punk' is the 'answer' to 'prog'. It may sound clever, but does it really ring true? Did legions of Yes fans suddenly wake up in 1977 and collectively say "my gawd, this is pretentious...whoah, have you heard this band called the Sex Pistols?!!" No, I doubt it. Most people I know who were prog fans in the 70's are still fans today. They may have given up a bit when bands such as Yes ran out of good concepts, but to think that people got sick of Yes and punk was created to 'answer' the 'overblown pretentions' of prog is stupid and lazy. And I doubt Johny Rotten, Sid Vicious, Jello Biafra, Joey Ramone et. al., were once prog fans or ever paid much attention to prog and one day said, "Blimey, let's write fast 3-chord songs with bloody nasty lyrics that last 2 minutes because prog songs are too long and pretentious an overblown." If punk was an 'answer' to any musical genre, it was more likely an 'answer' to the status quo stupidity of disco and the the lilly-white wonder-bread puke called the Carpenters and Harry Chapin.
Punk was a reaction to all the creaky rock music at the time that people in their teens and 20s could not relate to: boring prog bands, jaded 60's rock stars et al. I was converted after seeing an excruciatingly dull, plodding Led Zeppelin in 1978. After enduring Bonham's 20-minute drum solo I embraced the scene. It was great seeing new, young, exciting bands in clubs rather than paying too much money to see bored rock stars in stadiums. It seemed like every week there was a great new record released - even great 45s. New clubs started popping up with great new bands playing nightly. I saw Joey Ramone walking around my neighborhood in Queens occasionally. He was friendly and approachable unlike the dour rock stars ensconced in their limos surrounded by bodyguards. Years later I realized that there is only good or bad music. I'm still not a Yes fan but I do listen to all kinds of rock music including some LZ as well as blues, reggae, classical, jazz, folk, country, latin, & electronic among others. But in the late 70s it made perfect sense that punk came out to shake up the old guard. Oh and punks tended to like both disco and reggae.
beelzebubba wrote:
You know, some hack reporter for Rolling Stone magazine or somewhere wrote an article and described 'punk' as the natural 'answer' to the 'overblown pretention' of prog of the 70's, and people have latched onto his quote and have been repeating it like lemmings ever since, without really thinking about how smart the original quote was in the first place. Let's examine the notion that 'punk' is the 'answer' to 'prog'. It may sound clever, but does it really ring true? Did legions of Yes fans suddenly wake up in 1977 and collectively say "my gawd, this is pretentious...whoah, have you heard this band called the Sex Pistols?!!" No, I doubt it. Most people I know who were prog fans in the 70's are still fans today. They may have given up a bit when bands such as Yes ran out of good concepts, but to think that people got sick of Yes and punk was created to 'answer' the 'overblown pretentions' of prog is stupid and lazy. And I doubt Johny Rotten, Sid Vicious, Jello Biafra, Joey Ramone et. al., were once prog fans or ever paid much attention to prog and one day said, "Blimey, let's write fast 3-chord songs with bloody nasty lyrics that last 2 minutes because prog songs are too long and pretentious an overblown." If punk was an 'answer' to any musical genre, it was more likely an 'answer' to the status quo stupidity of disco and the the lilly-white wonder-bread puke called the Carpenters and Harry Chapin.
The above is a Top 5 RP post, for me. A couple years old, but I couldn't agree more.
I love the way this song was used in the movie \"Almost Famous\" - where the young reporter gets his very first glimpse backstage at a rock concert, like he was entering a secret fantasy world.