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Genesis — Firth Of Fifth
Album: Selling England By The Pound
Avg rating:
7.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1974








Released: 1973
Length: 9:32
Plays (last 30 days): 1
The path is clear
Though no eyes can see
The course laid down
Long before

And so with gods and men
The sheep remain
Inside their pen
Though many times
They've seen the way to leave

He rides majestic
Past homes of men
Who care not
Or gaze with joy

To see reflected there
The trees, the sky
The lily fair
The scene of death
Is lying just below

The mountain cuts off
The town from view
Like a cancer growth
Is removed by skill
Let it be revealed

A waterfall
His madrigal
An inland sea
His symphony

Undinal songs
Urge the sailors on
'Till lured by the siren's cry...

Now as the river
Dissolves in sea
So Neptune
Has claimed another soul

And so with gods and men
The sheep remain inside their pen
Until the shepherd
Leads his flock away

The sands of time
Were eroded by
The river
Of constant change
Comments (514)add comment
Genesis' "Foxtrot" album blew my mind wide open when I was a teenager, and "Selling England" does the same. Been tickling my brain in all sorts of interesting places ever since.
Rush?
oddly enuff

i prefer Peter Gabriel solo and Phil lead Genesis

this stuff is dog shit
Long Live                                                         Radio Paradise
Rating to me                                          9- O U T S T A N D I N G           almost 10
 peter881 wrote:
A guitar solo to die for . . . 
 
I remember seeing them do this live at Earl's Court in the 1970's, and 40 years later Steve Hackett still plays it at his live gigs . His current band are every bit as good too - check out his Genesis Revisited albums.
RP. Where else would you hear stuff like this. WONDERFUL. All in glorious FLAC - hooked for life.
The song that turned me on to Steve Hackett back in 1975. Spectral Mornings is still one of my absolute favorite albums.
 noe.architecte169 wrote:
It's not Peter singing ?
 
 

Yup.  There is one track on Selling England by the Pound that was sung by Phil Collins (More Fool Me, I think?) but it's definitely PG on this track.
love the original genesis, but not crazy about this song
A guitar solo to die for . . . 
This must be one of the best prog-rock/art rock albums of all time.

That said, most of early Genesis is pretty unforgettable.   There I said it.  
For me it's Gods-like. The "old Genesis" with Peter Gabriel was musically like heaven on earth....
This LP left an indelible impression on me..   so very good
The mortar between the stones in our wonderful, old auditorium has never been the same after Rutherford hit the bass pedals playing Firth of Fifth during the Wind & Wuthering USA Tour opener here in Boulder, Colorado.
It's not Peter singing ?
 
A poor mans King Crimson
Technically interesting song, but how did it wind up on the Groovy Mix? 
I always WANT to like this song more than I do. It's just a little too over-the-top for me, and as the song goes on I like it less and less, until at the end I'm left with "Meh."
 unclehud wrote:
BAM!  A shot from high school!  Lighting up in a Mercury Comet with the sunroof open and springtime streaming in ....
 
They made Mercury Comet's with sunroofs?!?!?  my father must've bought the low-end model...so sad
  brilliant !! {#Music}
Bass pedals!!!!!!!!!!Awesome
 Limpopoking wrote:
One of my extremely rare 10s

 
Same here. While not the emotional surreal punch Foxtrot (the album before this) had on my young mind, this was more mature and complex and hard to argue against it being their best record.
BAM!  A shot from high school!  Lighting up in a Mercury Comet with the sunroof open and springtime streaming in ....
 westslope wrote:
I listened to this album shortly after it came out in the early 1970s and immediately liked it.

To date, it is my favourite album of early Genesis work.  Lamb, Fox Trot, Nursey Cryme, they all contain songs I love but none of them come close to Selling England by the Pound.

In your opinion, which early Genesis album is better than Selling England?

 
None of them - it is (for me) the finest album ever made.
For me, this is the finest album EVER made.

Bought it the week it came out and have never tired of it.
 milaremi wrote:
Agreed @Westslope.

Never get enough of Selling England - used to listen to it while reading Tolkien.  Great memories

 
I still do!
 (Banned) wrote:

Well the fact you have no disrespect for Phil Collins says a lot.  However: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firth_of_Fifth

 
Pete's last Genesis album was the "Lamb", the one after this
Amazing!!!
Thank you thank you thank you for playing classic Genesis. This tune shows what badass musicians they are. More please! {#Bananajam}
 Limpopoking wrote:
One of my extremely rare 10s

 
Me too!
Great guitar solo.
 haretic wrote:
 (Banned) wrote:
And this is Phil Collins you know...  God Bless him, even though he is still alive.  Maybe reason even more!

 

No disrespect for Phil Collins, who of course played drums and sang harmonies with Genesis on this album;
but I'm pretty sure that's Peter Gabriel's voice out in front. I believe this was is last album with Genesis before
Phil stepped up to replace Mister Gabriel.

God bless them both, and all the rest of us!
 
Well the fact you have no disrespect for Phil Collins says a lot.  However: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firth_of_Fifth
One of my extremely rare 10s
 (Banned) wrote:
And this is Phil Collins you know...  God Bless him, even though he is still alive.  Maybe reason even more!

 

No disrespect for Phil Collins, who of course played drums and sang harmonies with Genesis on this album;
but I'm pretty sure that's Peter Gabriel's voice out in front. I believe this was is last album with Genesis before
Phil stepped up to replace Mister Gabriel.

God bless them both, and all the rest of us!
Agreed @Westslope.

Never get enough of Selling England - used to listen to it while reading Tolkien.  Great memories
I listened to this album shortly after it came out in the early 1970s and immediately liked it.

To date, it is my favourite album of early Genesis work.  Lamb, Fox Trot, Nursey Cryme, they all contain songs I love but none of them come close to Selling England by the Pound.

In your opinion, which early Genesis album is better than Selling England?
 Isabeau wrote:

Lovely with a touch of menace .... perfect description. 

 
Lovely with a touch of menace <—- that deserves to be posted again
 LowPhreak wrote:

Yes, I've known that since the album was current. I was just being facetious. {#Wink}

 
I did not know so thanks SurlyRon for the background.
 SurlyRon wrote:
LowPhreak wrote:
And what pray tell is a Firth of Fifth?

Is it like a Fifth of Filth?

Or Forth of Firth?

 
The title is a pun on the estuary of the River Forth in Scotland, commonly known as the Firth of Forth.
 
Yes, I've known that since the album was current. I was just being facetious. {#Wink}
LowPhreak wrote:
And what pray tell is a Firth of Fifth?

Is it like a Fifth of Filth?

Or Forth of Firth?

 
The title is a pun on the estuary of the River Forth in Scotland, commonly known as the Firth of Forth.
And what pray tell is a Firth of Fifth?

Is it like a Fifth of Filth?

Or Forth of Firth?


Sounds like a drummer who is lead vocalist.  Brilliant!
Lovely with a touch of menace like most early Genesis
 GeorgeMWoods wrote:
Pretentious. Like all their stuff.

 
Ok, so let's see your playlist.
 Kassbomb wrote:
Lovely with a touch of menace like most early Genesis

 
Lovely with a touch of menace .... perfect description. 
And this is Phil Collins you know...  God Bless him, even though he is still alive.  Maybe reason even more!

 
Definitly Godlike. {#Notworthy}

- Am I the only one that feels that after the 60's - early 70s rock music entered in decadence?
Pretentious. Like all their stuff.
Spectacular.

I recently learned to play this... or approximate it... on piano.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AD-er_H_4o 
The Mother of All The Genesis Albums {#Good-vibes}{#Music}
 markybx wrote:
Pure poetry

9 -> 10

 
love. song and album. sigh...
 drews wrote:
"selling england by the pound" rings truer than ever as the neoliberal ideologues from the outsourcing corporations rip apart the infrastructure of this once great country, and slowly drag us towards a third world future of extreme wealth and poverty, a devastated healthcare system, crap transport, corruption and tax evasion

but then again we're not having the shit bombed out of us like the poor sods in Syria, so can't complain too hard  

 
I disagree, we should be more than complaining. They should be working for us, not using us as their private income and power stream. More and more are seeing through the unjust system that keeps people in perpetual slavery and uses fear as the tool to keep us in place. This includes the fear of us being within a war zone rather than in the 'safety' of our controlled state. 

It's time for a peaceful reset. I'm in. I'm ready for it. 
 
YES   YES   YES 
OMG, I forgot how much I love this song.  Please play more Gabriel Genesis!
I have to admit that the "Second's Out" version is even better than the studio album, musically even more dynamic with Bruford back there with Collins (when not singing).  Hackett's live solo is stunning. 
Pure poetry

9 -> 10
"selling england by the pound" rings truer than ever as the neoliberal ideologues from the outsourcing corporations rip apart the infrastructure of this once great country, and slowly drag us towards a third world future of extreme wealth and poverty, a devastated healthcare system, crap transport, corruption and tax evasion

but then again we're not having the shit bombed out of us like the poor sods in Syria, so can't complain too hard  
This song takes me to a time and place in my youth. Especially the live version on "Seconds Out". Love this song.
Best album ever. Best band ever.
Man, I love the hook on this song.

Never tire of it. 
And now I know what undinal means. 
genes at their best! Please play more!
 Aural_not_Oral wrote:

It's one o'clock and time for lunch - Hum de-dum de-dee.
When the sun beats down, and I'm lying on the bench
I can always hear them talk...

 
Probably one of my favorite set of lyrics.
One of the truly great progressive rock albums, by one of the great bands of all time.
 westslope wrote:

Selling England by the Pound is definitely my favourite Genesis album and is far better or certainly more consistent than the Lamb Likes Down on Broadway album. 

 
Ditto here.
 bluematrix wrote:
Just gave me chills. Again. As it has since I was a wee lad. Thanks Bill.

And what a great segue into Frou Frou... dang, you're good.

 
Hopefully everyone remembers that RP has been playing some of the best music around for 16 years with no commercials.

I donate every year for that very reason. 
Just gave me chills. Again. As it has since I was a wee lad. Thanks Bill.

And what a great segue into Frou Frou... dang, you're good.
 davesbuster wrote:
...... Most early Genesis fans seem to think the Lamb was their peak, but I think Selling England By The Pound was their high water mark.  After Steve Hackett left, it was all over.

 
Selling England by the Pound is definitely my favourite Genesis album and is far better or certainly more consistent than the Lamb Likes Down on Broadway album. 
 Motolorax wrote:
How do you do it Bill?
 
That's exactly what I thought when I heard him spin this track.  I love the fact that he has some excellent prog sensibilities (Genesis, King Crimson, Porcupine Tree and/or Steven Wilson come to mind) and that he manages to blend some prog to the mix almost seamlessly, even when it's one of the epics of the genre such as Firth of Fifth.
 TotalHip wrote:

lbaltz
wrote:
I never tire of this song.  If you like it don't miss the 2nd leg of Steve Hackett's spring 2016 tour if he's anywhere near you.  He and his band are incredible and their version of this tune is spectacular!

 
... and his solo in Firth still again brought chills to my spine. A wonderful show indeed.

 
I've caught the last few tours and Firth of course is a highlight.  Another was around a year ago, where he went into a very extended rendition of Fly on a Windshield / Broadway Melody of 1974.  Also met him on The Cruise to the Edge a few years ago and he's a genuinely nice guy.

lbaltz
wrote:
I never tire of this song.  If you like it don't miss the 2nd leg of Steve Hackett's spring 2016 tour if he's anywhere near you.  He and his band are incredible and their version of this tune is spectacular!

 
... and his solo in Firth still again brought chills to my spine. A wonderful show indeed.
One of Genesis BEST OF THE BEST!!
 Ikharry wrote:
For me, it's Steve Hackett who carried the creative and surprising twists in sound of Genesis in this period. I don't use the words genious often, but this comes very close....

 
Well I rather hope nobody uses the word genious often. Still, all semantic snarkiness aside I know what you mean.
Ah the good old days when Phil was behind the drums and his pop voice not heard. This is one of my all time favorite songs. Hackett and Banks at their best.
For me, it's Steve Hackett who carried the creative and surprising twists in sound of Genesis in this period. I don't use the words genious often, but this comes very close....
Amen !
How do you do it Bill? It's like you're rifling through my collection.  When the music world was going to goth and heavy metal for the first time in the mid 80s a neighbour 20 odd yrs my senior encouraged me to tape his record collection. Tull, Genesis, Led Zep, Floyd. My path was set. Thirty odd years later and with a broad and shifting musical taste these are the foundations of my life soundtrack.  I don't need to hear them all the time, but whenever I do put them on or Bill does it for me my life plays again. It's the magic of music. So I guess for me as somebody who considers them self no expert or muso, it's mostly irrelevant whether or not these tracks are technically or artistically standing the test of time, they are part of my life and deeply sweet music to my ears.  However, a quick listen to contemporary pop music certainly suggests to me that albums like 'Wish you were here' and 'houses of the holy' were born of something mostly lacking from most contemporary music. But like i said, I'm a zoologist, not a music critic.
 I sincerely doubt Pulp Fiction will still be on anyone's radar 40 years from now.  Remember this song is almost 43 years old and still has a very large and enthusiastic audience.  As far as I am concerned it has stood the test of time...
 For me, it has not lost its original flavor..Surely it is not like the usual ..  It is the unusual that has attracted me for all of these years.  To each his own.  misterbearbaby wrote:

 

 iggam wrote:

Early Genesis songs are like the movie "Forrest Gump", only longer and slightly less entertaining. 

 
I have to agree with the grumpy, dour post above. I can't believe I used to listen to this sh*t! 

I lay all the blame on certain extremely powerful, psychotomimetic recreational drugs that were prevalent at the time. I had just stopped playing in my county's (junior) symphony orchestra and wanted to believe that there was innate value in the compositions of some of the progressive rock bands. Ahemm...

In the rear view mirror, it looks pretty tiny and silly now; it was a fad at the time I suppose. I did just re-watch "Forrest Gump" and had about the same hollow feeling.To survive the ages, music must have some feeling; it has to rock, not just roll.  (Watch "Pulp Fiction" also from 1994- now that still rocks!)

Steve Hackett's excellent musicianship isn't even sufficient to pull the sad "Selling England by the Pound"  album from the slow-burning dumpster fire it represents. 



 

 


A 10 just for the piano intro. Then they get to the jam in the middle of the song and it gets even better. I need an 11.
My favorite Genesis song I feel so secure knowing the sheep are in their pen waiting for the shepherd.
I never tire of this song.  If you like it don't miss the 2nd leg of Steve Hackett's spring 2016 tour if he's anywhere near you.  He and his band are incredible and their version of this tune is spectacular!
 For me, it has not lost its original flavor..Surely it is not like the usual ..  It is the unusual that has attracted me for all of these years.  To each his own.  misterbearbaby wrote:

 

 iggam wrote:

Early Genesis songs are like the movie "Forrest Gump", only longer and slightly less entertaining. 

 
I have to agree with the grumpy, dour post above. I can't believe I used to listen to this sh*t! 

I lay all the blame on certain extremely powerful, psychotomimetic recreational drugs that were prevalent at the time. I had just stopped playing in my county's (junior) symphony orchestra and wanted to believe that there was innate value in the compositions of some of the progressive rock bands. Ahemm...

In the rear view mirror, it looks pretty tiny and silly now; it was a fad at the time I suppose. I did just re-watch "Forrest Gump" and had about the same hollow feeling.To survive the ages, music must have some feeling; it has to rock, not just roll.  (Watch "Pulp Fiction" also from 1994- now that still rocks!)

Steve Hackett's excellent musicianship isn't even sufficient to pull the sad "Selling England by the Pound"  album from the slow-burning dumpster fire it represents. 



 


One of my earliest and still one of my favorite albums of all time.
 daveesh wrote:
this is truly painful.

 
Agree. Reminds me of experimental theater where you end up sitting through 90-minutes of a tortured performance, but see a glimpse of brilliance here and there. The hope is they learn through the process, grow the brilliance and shelve the rest of it.
Piano and base chords remind me sooo much of Renaissance except they are much simpler. Love this classical rock sound
 LowPhreak wrote:

Same here.

 
yep, one of my few 10s. but looking at the stats, we're in good ten company :)
 daveesh wrote:
this is truly painful.

 
Maybe you should see Dr. Flowers?


 westslope wrote:

I have it rated 10.

 
Same here.
In 1973, a friend told me "You have to listen to this band, Genesis - they're great!"  He dropped the needle and the first thing I heard was "It's one o'clock and time for lunch - dum de dum de dum"  "You've got to be kidding me - what is this crap?" I said.  It wasn't until after Gabriel left Genesis that I realized what I had missed.  Most early Genesis fans seem to think the Lamb was their peak, but I think Selling England By The Pound was their high water mark.  After Steve Hackett left, it was all over.
 iggam wrote:
Early Genesis songs are like the movie "Forrest Gump", only longer and slightly less entertaining. 

 
It's one o'clock and time for lunch - Hum de-dum de-dee.
When the sun beats down, and I'm lying on the bench
I can always hear them talk...
 daveesh wrote:
this is truly painful.

 
I have it rated 10.
 stunix wrote:
I never got on with early to mid Genesis. I've tried in an aim to educate myself, but, no, its just a bunch of noodling noodles.

 
In my opinion you either like early Genesis it or you don't.  I've always like early Genesis maybe growing up with it as a teenager in the 70's helped. I'm not sure it would be something I would enjoy if I just heard it for the first time.
oh. is this still on?
Im a huge prog rock fan from Floyd to Heep and Tull to Tree.    I never got on with early to mid Genesis.   I've tried in an aim to educate myself, but, no, its just a bunch of noodling noodles.  Love Gabriels solo stuff from start to finish thou, Rotherford and Collins have produced some commercial stuff worthy of a listen or two, but Hackett and Banks?    Sitting with Tap in the WATN file.

5
Great track. Sends shivers up my spine. If you don't hear the extremely low bass pedal notes then it's a good excuse to buy a sub.
this is truly painful.
thank goodness for PSD when a song like this is played.
 misterbearbaby wrote:

 

 

In the rear view mirror, it looks pretty tiny and silly now; it was a fad at the time I suppose.

...

To survive the ages, music must have some feeling; it has to rock, not just roll.



 
I suppose one could say that about most any hit record of the past 50 years (looks tiny and silly), if one were cynical. Anyone saying SEBTP didn't have "some feeling" or created a "feel" (atmosphere), then they just don't get it.

Eh, opinions...
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Well, I think we've pretty much beaten this one to death. I prefer Pete-era Genesis, but will be the first to say that Trick of the Tail was excellent and several other Phil-era tracks were outstanding. We both appear to be Genesis and 70s prog fans, so I say, cheers, LowPhreak!  {#Cheers}

 
Yeah truce man, we flogged the snot outta that burro. {#Biggrin}
Def a 70's prog fan like you. It's what I grew up on and played in some of my bands, {#Drummer} I can dig any era of Genesis but after Duke it wasn't prog anymore. :(

Here's to all ye Squonk huntin' carpet crawlers!!  {#High-five}  {#Cheers}

 

 iggam wrote:

Early Genesis songs are like the movie "Forrest Gump", only longer and slightly less entertaining. 

 
I have to agree with the grumpy, dour post above. I can't believe I used to listen to this sh*t! 

I lay all the blame on certain extremely powerful, psychotomimetic recreational drugs that were prevalent at the time. I had just stopped playing in my county's (junior) symphony orchestra and wanted to believe that there was innate value in the compositions of some of the progressive rock bands. Ahemm...

In the rear view mirror, it looks pretty tiny and silly now; it was a fad at the time I suppose. I did just re-watch "Forrest Gump" and had about the same hollow feeling.To survive the ages, music must have some feeling; it has to rock, not just roll.  (Watch "Pulp Fiction" also from 1994- now that still rocks!)

Steve Hackett's excellent musicianship isn't even sufficient to pull the sad "Selling England by the Pound"  album from the slow-burning dumpster fire it represents. 


 LowPhreak wrote:
It's more than just me with that opinion about PG, but of course you won't hear it from his uber fans. I also had friends back then who thought much the same - well before the internet was even a concept on some nerd's slide rule.
What gets me is people constantly whining about PG's departure, when actually Genesis was much more than just the vocals/lyrics, whether Peter or Phil sang. It was the instrumentals and compositions that made them what they are, like several other great prog bands, and it didn't stop when Peter left.
 
Well, I think we've pretty much beaten this one to death. I prefer Pete-era Genesis, but will be the first to say that Trick of the Tail was excellent and several other Phil-era tracks were outstanding. We both appear to be Genesis and 70s prog fans, so I say, cheers, LowPhreak!  {#Cheers}
Early Genesis songs are like the movie "Forrest Gump", only longer and slightly less entertaining. 
 On_The_Beach wrote:

So this whole thing is about Pete wearing a flower mask after its "best before" date?
I have to say at this point I've lost interest in the entire subject.
As for needlessly calling me biased, here's a news flash; anyone who likes some music better than others (like you, me and everyone else) is biased by definition.
Personally, I've never heard anyone other than you refer to Gabriel as having an "entitled snotty rich kid vibe".
Certainly sounds like a completely open-minded and unbiased comment to me.

 
It's more than just me with that opinion about PG, but of course you won't hear it from his uber fans. I also had friends back then who thought much the same - well before the internet was even a concept on some nerd's slide rule.

What gets me is people constantly whining about PG's departure, when actually Genesis was much more than just the vocals/lyrics, whether Peter or Phil sang. It was the instrumentals and compositions that made them what they are, like several other great prog bands, and it didn't stop when Peter left.
 LowPhreak wrote:
You should take that up with Peter Gabriel, because he said it himself: "At the 1982 Milton Keynes reunion show, Gabriel admitted that Collins sang the songs "better", though never "quite like" him."
I did not say that Peter was better or worse as a vocalist than Phil, ('artist' would encompass many things that they did in the band, not just singing). That wasn't my point. Also, I mentioned some of Peter's solo tunes from So not as a critique of his vocal ability but as an example of the vibe he puts out; which to many came off at the time as reinforcing what they saw when he was in Genesis.
As we all know, they're both quite good musicians and as I've said, I've always liked Peter's vocals in Genesis as much as Phil's. Rather, it was Peter's stage theatrics and his ego at the time that needed a break.
Try to better comprehend what is written instead of seeing it through your heavily biased filter.
 
So this whole thing is about Pete wearing a flower mask after its "best before" date?
I have to say at this point I've lost interest in the entire subject.
As for needlessly calling me biased, here's a news flash; anyone who likes some music better than others (like you, me and everyone else) is biased by definition.
Personally, I've never heard anyone other than you refer to Gabriel as having an "entitled snotty rich kid vibe".
Certainly sounds like a completely open-minded and unbiased comment to me.
The first Genesis....the best Genesis
 
Genesis was my introduction to progressive rock. This was the first song I heard from Genesis and what a trip it was.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Wow, so you're seriously arguing that Phil Collins is a superior artist to Peter Gabriel? Yikes.
You've heard their solo work, right?
Phil's solo stuff made Lionel Ritchie look like a rock & roll animal. The musical equivalent of pancake syrup.
Interesting that you pick Gabriel's two weakest and most "Phil-like" tracks as representative (they're almost as bad as Phil!).
Anyway, it's a free country and everyone is entitled to their opinion.
Keep on groovin' to Groovy Kind of Love!

 
You should take that up with Peter Gabriel, because he said it himself: "At the 1982 Milton Keynes reunion show, Gabriel admitted that Collins sang the songs "better", though never "quite like" him."

I did not say that Peter was better or worse as a vocalist than Phil, ('artist' would encompass many things that they did in the band, not just singing). That wasn't my point. Also, I mentioned some of Peter's solo tunes from So not as a critique of his vocal ability but as an example of the vibe he puts out; which to many came off at the time as reinforcing what they saw when he was in Genesis.

As we all know, they're both quite good musicians and as I've said, I've always liked Peter's vocals in Genesis as much as Phil's. Rather, it was Peter's stage theatrics and his ego at the time that needed a break.

Try to better comprehend what is written instead of seeing it through your heavily biased filter.
 LowPhreak wrote:
While I've greatly admired Peter for his work in Genesis and solo, he should have quit some of the theatrics and costumes well before Lamb. It would have been nice to see a Genesis show without it around the time of Selling England..., or even Foxtrot, since it was interesting and "new" for the first few albums but by late '73 it was worn out. I was 12 then and even at that age I thought so after having seen Genesis live 3 times.

Not only did Peter not know how or want to find a different schtick at that time, but according to Wiki:

"Collins's approach to Genesis shows differed from the theatrical performances of Gabriel, and his interpretations of older songs were lighter and more subtle. At the 1982 Milton Keynes reunion show, Gabriel admitted that Collins sang the songs "better", though never "quite like" him."

Peter with his ego often took himself and his lyrics/vocals too seriously and still does. He also never quite shed the entitled snotty rich kid vibe though complained that others saw Genesis that way, (not a wonder with solo hits like "Sledgehammer" and "Big Time" with 80's yuppies). I've had a bit of that impression from Mike and Tony as well, not as much from Phil, Steve, or Chester.

Thus I've always said about that period of Genesis: Peter became a bit stuck in a mode (it is after all - progressive rock), although I liked all of Selling England... and much of Lamb. He left that great band none too soon.
 
Wow, so you're seriously arguing that Phil Collins is a superior artist to Peter Gabriel? Yikes.
You've heard their solo work, right?
Phil's solo stuff made Lionel Ritchie look like a rock & roll animal. The musical equivalent of pancake syrup.
Interesting that you pick Gabriel's two weakest and most "Phil-like" tracks as representative (they're almost as bad as Phil!).
Anyway, it's a free country and everyone is entitled to their opinion.
Keep on groovin' to Groovy Kind of Love!
true musicians from musical era
This is good stuff. I'm hearing this for the first time.
 On_The_Beach wrote:

Trick of the Tail was excellent & Wind & Wuthering was pretty good.
After that, it was pretty slim pickin's.
 
Opinion. Perhaps better if you just stay on the Myopic Gabriel Bandwagon™.

While I've greatly admired Peter for his work in Genesis and solo, he should have quit some of the theatrics and costumes well before Lamb. It would have been nice to see a Genesis show without it around the time of Selling England..., or even Foxtrot, since it was interesting and "new" for the first few albums but by late '73 it was worn out. I was 12 then and even at that age I thought so after having seen Genesis live 3 times.

Not only did Peter not know how or want to find a different schtick at that time, but according to Wiki:

"Collins's approach to Genesis shows differed from the theatrical performances of Gabriel, and his interpretations of older songs were lighter and more subtle. At the 1982 Milton Keynes reunion show, Gabriel admitted that Collins sang the songs "better", though never "quite like" him."

Peter with his ego often took himself and his lyrics/vocals too seriously and still does. He also never quite shed the entitled snotty rich kid vibe though complained that others saw Genesis that way, (not a wonder with solo hits like "Sledgehammer" and "Big Time" with 80's yuppies). I've had a bit of that impression from Mike and Tony as well, not as much from Phil, Steve, or Chester.

Thus I've always said about that period of Genesis: Peter became a bit stuck in a mode (it is after all - progressive rock), although I liked all of Selling England... and much of Lamb. He left that great band none too soon.


 reindeer wrote:
Thank you Bill and Rebecca for including this gem in my late night listening.
One of my favorites of all time.
This song reminds me of a kinder, gentler time.
Love Banks piano here, and the flute solo.
I used to play this on my flute, a long time ago.

 
Do you still play that flute all these years later?  I don't think I've actually heard one live and in person since my daughter finished her high school band concert years in 2005.


 LowPhreak wrote:
I can name at least 5 great albums after Gabriel left:
Trick Of The Tail
Wind & Wuthering
...And Then There Were Three...
Duke
Abacab
Get over it.
 
Trick of the Tail was excellent & Wind & Wuthering was pretty good.
After that, it was pretty slim pickin's.
As you would say, get over it.
 gjeeg wrote:
Heard live, the bass just shatters! Genesis had mastered the technology of rumbling an entire auditorium; bass pedals would thunder the place to frightening extent. Right at the edge of live music experience.

Heard this once, forty years ago.
Haven't been the same since.
Genesis - at the Absolute Height of progressive rock genius.

 
Yes, well said.
With the right sound reproduction equipment, the bass will shake the walls towards the end of this track.  It's sets you back on your heels.
Genesis explored things musically that were cutting edge for the time, and arrangements that were intensely complex.
The use of the Mellotron electric piano; electronic effects; the use of two drum kits; insane over the top live shows with blacklights and costumes.  It was a time of experimentation.  Long songs that don't fit the sub 4 minute mold.  Ballads that have several parts, chord and style changes that are unexpected.  Score timing that was unusual, like 9/8 time.  Unique instruments that were custom made.  It was a time of great creativity.  It's just sad to me that there are so many who are closed to it and hate something that they don't understand or accept because it doesn't sound exactly like everything else.  Thank you Bill for having the courage to play songs and artists like this who are *different*.  Anyone can tune in the FM dial and here everyone sound the same.  Who wants that?  No thanks.
I love Radio Paradise *because* of of early Genesis and all of the other wonderful (and sometimes forgotten) music.
I see that at least two people on this thread have been awakened to early Genesis.  That's a good thing.
Selling England by the Pound is a good album to start with, as it's considered by many to be one of the best of the early period of Genesis. 
Spinal Tap comes to mind.
Thank you Bill and Rebecca for including this gem in my late night listening.
One of my favorites of all time.
This song reminds me of a kinder, gentler time.
Love Banks piano here, and the flute solo.
I used to play this on my flute, a long time ago.
One of the greatest songs for piano ever created, and the Mellotron truly makes it shine.
I had to stop what I was doing and listen, and close my eyes with my headphones on.
The guitar solo at the end is inspirational.
This song right here is why I am a loyal listener of Radio Paradise.
You would never hear this on FM radio, except perhaps as a fluke.
Thanks again Bill.


 treatment_bound wrote:

Phil Collins

 
I may be wrong, but I think he's demonstrating what exactly he's banging the tambourine with.
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Photo below shows Phil answering the question "How many good albums did Genesis produce after Gabriel left?".

 
I can name at least 5 great albums after Gabriel left:

Trick Of The Tail

Wind & Wuthering

...And Then There Were Three...

Duke

Abacab

{#Ass}

Get over it.
Photo below shows Phil answering the question "How many good albums did Genesis produce after Gabriel left?".
 musikluvr wrote:

At least it beats the hell out of Sussudio.

 
Phil Collins