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Oliver Mtukudzi — Tapindwa Nei
Album: Tuku Music
Avg rating:
6.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 908









Released: 1999
Length: 6:33
Plays (last 30 days): 2
Ndozviudza aniko,
Nditaurire aniko,
Ndigazvitaure sei ahh ah
Rega ndirambe ndinyere, Zvandityisa,
zveityisa
(Who shall I tell this to, Who shall I tell this to,How will I say it, Let me keep quiet, This is scary)

Ndozviudza aniko, aniko
Nditaurire aniko, aniko
Ndigazvitaure sei ahh ah
Rega ndirambe ndinyere
Zvandityisa,
haiwaiwa varumewe Zvaityisa

Varume tapindwa neiko
Varume tapindwa neiko isu
Kubata mwana chiBharo asati akura
Kubata mwana chiBharo asati akomba
(Men, what has got into us, how can u rape a child before she has matured)

Ndozviudza aniko, aniko
Nditaurire aniko, aniko
Ndigazvitaure sei ahh ah
Rega ndirambe ndinyere
Zvandityisa,
haiwaiwa varumewe Zvaityisa

Ndozviudza aniko, aniko
Nditaurire aniko, aniko
Ndigazvitaure sei ahh ah
Rega ndirambe ndinyere
Zvandityisa,
haiwaiwa varumewe Zvaityisa

Ndozviudza aniko, aniko
Nditaurire aniko, aniko
Ndigazvitaure sei ahh ah
Rega ndirambe ndinyere
Zvandityisa,
haiwaiwa varumewe Zvaityisa

Mhirikovo vakomana, mai
Mhirikovo asati akomba maiwe
Mhirikovo varume we, mai
Mhirikovo asati akomba maiwe
Dai ari wako wainzwa sei
Dai ari wako wainzwa sei
(If she was your child, how would u feel)

Chorus
Kana riri domba
Idomba rudzii vakomana
Kana iri nzara
Inzara rudzii warumewe
Kana riri domba
Idomba rudzii vakomana
(If it is desire, What kind of desire is it)

Kubata mwana chibharo asati akura
Kubata mwana chibharo asati akura

Mhirikovo vakomana, mai
Mhirikovo asati akomba maiwe
Mhirikovo varume we, mai
Mhirikovo asati akomba maiwe
Comments (109)add comment
 mach-hog wrote:
Interesting subject matter indeed. Remember that Africa is not like Europe or the New World. If this works to develop conscience or contribute to social engineering then let it play!
 
This comment smacks of paternalistic condescension.  Are you stating that the only reason this song should be played on RP is that it might uplift Africans, or make Europeans and North Americans more tolerant of their brethren in Africa?   

Good music is good music. 

The greatest musical artists frequently delve into social justice issues, irregardless of their origin.  Thank you, Bill, for playing the vast array of good music that you select for your playlists.  I don't love everything you play, but I do appreciate the musical quality of your selections, and  have yet to hit the PSD button in the 6 years or so that I have been listening, almost daily, to your station.   
Interesting subject matter indeed. Remember that Africa is not like Europe or the New World. If this works to develop conscience or contribute to social engineering then let it play!
Sadly, Oliver Mtukudzi died January 23, 2019. He'll be missed.
Good Music from Africa
 hallogallo wrote:


Love this album.  Such a positive and affirming vibe from
Oliver Mtukudzi.

 
Not with those lyrics.  Sorry.....
Thanks, BillG, for turning me on to Tuku music. I have a few of his anthologies now. 
 haretic wrote:
OK, a very nice sounding African tune, with a kind of lilting lyrical quality.
But then I looked up the lyrics! What a clash, the sound of this song and the subject matter of the lyrics! (Scroll down for some samples). I just cannot reconcile the two. Maybe that incongruity is part of the art, and it all just loses too much in the translation... but no, I can't applaud this. I won't rate it at all.

 
Avery beautiful song acknowledging very disturbing subject matter.  Cognitive dissonance forming.
check the lyrics. this song is about child rape
no, it is not OK to rape a child before or after he or she has matured, either

 number7 wrote:
Sometimes I wonder, would I like or hate the words to songs I don't understand.
I like this anyhow.

 


Sometimes I wonder, would I like or hate the words to songs I don't understand.
I like this anyhow.
very nice, makes a grey day feel warm and sunny.....
no, no, no. just no. enough already.
Shifting further and further down the scale each time I hear it. Thank you, Bill, for providing us with the PSD button.
Good to hear something of this ilk which isn't Amadou and Mariam, check out some good ol Madagascan music for thoroughly cheery and danceable vibes, especially Tarika.
 misterbearbaby wrote:


I'm going to buy the CD, tape it to a large salami, and beat my sister-in-law over the head with it. She needs some positive and affirming vibes.
 
lol. mainly a good use of a cd, i think?
 hallogallo wrote:


Love this album.  Such a positive and affirming vibe from
Oliver Mtukudzi.
 

I'm going to buy the CD, tape it to a large salami, and beat my sister-in-law over the head with it. She needs some positive and affirming vibes.


Love this album.  Such a positive and affirming vibe from
Oliver Mtukudzi.


OK, a very nice sounding African tune, with a kind of lilting lyrical quality.
But then I looked up the lyrics! What a clash, the sound of this song and the subject matter of the lyrics! (Scroll down for some samples). I just cannot reconcile the two. Maybe that incongruity is part of the art, and it all just loses too much in the translation... but no, I can't applaud this. I won't rate it at all.
 papaman wrote:
Cool head gear. I wonder what the back end looks like.
Oliver's mama: "oli-VER! What is that on your head, child? That thing could put someone's eye out!"

 rdo wrote:
I love these Windham Hill-like arrangements.
 Blasphemer! (heh heh).
Okay, but it does go on...
This is AWESOME.  I love you RP for introducing me to the best music ever whenever I listen to you!
Another reason that I lurve RP.

I've become a giant fan of Tuku music because of my exposure through Bill's playlist. There's a nice two CD collection of Oliver's greatest hits.

Definitely not a drum machine in this production ! {#Drummer} #6

 On_The_Beach wrote:
Oh great, another Paul Simon imitator!  {#Wink}
 

{#Lol}
Itssss grrrrrrreeeeeaaaaaattttttt!!{#Bananajam}9!!!!


This song is good for the ears...


Oh great, another Paul Simon imitator!  {#Wink}
Happy birthday, Radio Paradise! Thanks for ten years of great music!
I love these Windham Hill-like arrangements.

Wikipedia:

Unlike Mapfumo, Mtukudzi has refrained from directly criticizing the repressive government of Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe, perhaps because he still lives in the country. However, some of his most emotive hits prodded the aging authoritarian ruler, including "Ndakuvara," which bemoans the politcal violence engineered by Mugabe's ZANU-PF party and "Wasakara (You Are Getting Old)," which most Zimbabweans took as a direct plea for Mugabe to retire.


This song I've flunked on lyrics.
I liked the music.
 Mandible wrote:
hmmmm i was thinking of adding this to my list of yoga music, UNTIL I read the lyrics.

  i know


 papaman wrote:
Cool head gear. I wonder what the back end looks like.
  an elephant butt?


Burl Ives?
hmmmm i was thinking of adding this to my list of yoga music, UNTIL I read the lyrics.

cattgirl813 wrote:
Here's a sample of the lyrics: Men, what has gotten into us? How can you rape a child before she has matured? If it is desire, what kind of desire is this? Sad and unthinkable, but if it keeps at least one person from victimizing another, it should be a never ending loop.


wow ... thanks for the translation ...

If a Baobab tree had an elevator, this would be playing in it.

  Great, now THIS comes on! I'll never be able to leave the office at this rate! {#Lol}  {#Notworthy}


Cool head gear. I wonder what the back end looks like.
There is no Sunny Ade in the library. Vote yes on Ja Funmi (LRC nearest you) :-)
kazuma wrote:
When did Paul Simon record with Sunny Ade? I wasn't aware of that and can't seem to find anything about it.
Probably thinking of Ladysmith Black Mambazo
martin451 wrote:
I was first introduced to African beats when Paul Simon recorded with King Sunni Ada (sp?).
When did Paul Simon record with Sunny Ade? I wasn't aware of that and can't seem to find anything about it.
in the first few seconds i thought this was Kottke/Gordon........I like.......
AphidA wrote:
This sounds like a never ending loop. :frustrated:
I like never ending loops. :whistle:
interesting fusion
AphidA wrote:
This sounds like a never ending loop. :frustrated:
Here's a sample of the lyrics: Men, what has gotten into us? How can you rape a child before she has matured? If it is desire, what kind of desire is this? Sad and unthinkable, but if it keeps at least one person from victimizing another, it should be a never ending loop.
lester wrote:
Thanks for the translation, which is always nice to have. But about my question . . .
Whirled music: tunes that defy a culture's ingrained linearity of thought when perceived from that culture's perspective.
Caught part of Tuku at ACL Fest - would love to see him in a more intimate environment (e.g., someplace with seating, acoustics, and air conditioning...not necessarily in that order). Lot of fun!
BAY AREA - Oliver is at Yoshi's nightclub! Tonight through Sept 13th. Wish I could go... :wall:
Refreashing change of pace. 7
I was first introduced to African beats when Paul Simon recorded with King Sunni Ada (sp?). Different, and very listenable, but very mood related. Then came Ry Cooder and Ali Farke Torre. Great music. Again, mood related. I'm not always popping it into the CD player in the car, but I like to listen to it once in a while because it reminds me that there's more to the world than the G8, and there's some great music coming from everywhere. I've only recently become an RP listener, but I can't say enough good about it. The music is open and informal. It is also, above all else, all inclusive. And that means that we get a mix of music from all over the world. Play on - because variety is...you guessed it...the spice of life.
What will become of this world, men abuse innocent children . . . imagine how you would feel if it were your child? I love this artist
nick_valensi wrote:
I just guess I'm not in the mood for RP today.
I know. Isn't it odd? Some days I really like 95% of what RP plays and then other days I only really like about 30%. That being said, I'm grooving on Oliver Mtukudzi today.
This sounds like a never ending loop. :frustrated:
I just guess I'm not in the mood for RP today.
liked this at first, but now it's a little monotonous...how about some Baaba Maal?
I love this song!
wade44 wrote:
This song is tired. It needs a vacation. So does Sufjan Stevens :)
So do you. It still rates 9 in my book.
I like the sound of the song and his vocal style. It conveys very peaceful, centered mood. From what I've read in these posts, the lyrics are quite dark and sad - this makes for an interesting juxtaposition of mood and meaning.
Sorry, just don't like it. I'd rather listen to bagpipes than this.
This song is tired. It needs a vacation. So does Sufjan Stevens :)
jehahn wrote:
This song was interesting at first. Then it was familiar. Then it was tiresome. Now it's just overplayed. Please, make it stop. It was fine 6 months ago, but now it just needs to retire. Or at least take a leave of absence.
Agreed. It's a 2 now.
i work as a sound engineer, and was born and grew up in Zimbabwe. I've worked with Oliver or 'Tuku' as he's affectionately known throughout Southern Africa. This isn't one of his best tracks, but i can assure you that this guy is the real deal. I'm glad to see him getting the audience he deserves, long may it continue.
Sorry Jehahn. Disagree completely. Still a solid 9 in my book :dance:
This song was interesting at first. Then it was familiar. Then it was tiresome. Now it's just overplayed. Please, make it stop. It was fine 6 months ago, but now it just needs to retire. Or at least take a leave of absence.
Art_Carnage wrote:
Oliver needs to buy a vowel.
ArbiterOfGoodTaste wrote:
LOL, reminds me of this: (click here)
HAHA! this had to be on top.
One of an increasing number of songs on RP that send me running for my MP3's. Maybe RP needs a Super Eclectic day part where Bill can get these tunes out of his system. Don't get me wrong, I have discovered and purchased a lot of new music thanks to RP. This artist won't be joining that list.
SURELY an 8. Africa at it's best. I miss more "World-MUSIC" anyway, especially from Mali. What about Rokia Traore? What about Boubakar 'Kar Kar' Traore? Nearly a shock, we're not getting "GIGI" (Ethiopia, produced in NYC)here.
You were doin' ok til you tried to pair "afro celt" and "crap". Try again. thewiseking wrote:
now this is good "world" music. indigenous and authentic, as opposed to that fuzak, synthesized, kenny g/afro celt crap.
bmo wrote:
song lyrics (transliteration & translation)
Thanks for the translation, which is always nice to have. But about my question . . .
lester wrote:
I love this stuff, too. But I've always wondered which part of the world "world" music comes from and which of the world's parts produce no "world" music. Can anybody characterize the genre a little better?
Kana riri domba if it is desire Idomba rudzii vakomana what kind of desire is it Kana iri nzara if it is hunger Inzara rudzii warumewe what kind of hunger is it Kana riri domba if it is desire Idomba rudzii vakomana what kind of desire is it Kana yave nzara if it is hunger Inzara rudzii warumewe what kind of hunger is it Kubata mwana chibharo asati akura how can u rape a child before she has matured Wobata mwana chibharo asati akomba how can u rape a child before she has matured
thewiseking wrote:
now this is good "world" music. indigenous and authentic, as opposed to that fuzak, synthesized, kenny g/afro celt crap.
I love this stuff, too. But I've always wondered which part of the world "world" music comes from and which of the world's parts produce no "world" music. Can anybody characterize the genre a little better?
thewiseking wrote:
now this is good "world" music. indigenous and authentic, as opposed to that fuzak, synthesized, kenny g/afro celt crap.
Whoa, at first I thought I was reading my own comment and couldn't figure out what I'd meant by "fuzak". Then I realized it was just my own opinion coming out of someone else. This is good "world" music.
now this is good "world" music. indigenous and authentic, as opposed to that fuzak, synthesized, kenny g/afro celt crap.
trekhead wrote:
I'll be the first to admit, I originally could not find room for this in my head. I rated it low ,2/3. Called it 'subtitle' music. Now... a 6 and , I think , growing. Kinda WORLD MUSIC -like Neat rhythms, soothing 'lyrics' not at all bad.
I'm going the other way with it, liked it at first but the subtle parts of the music are starting to wear on me. I wouldn't call it dorky, but...
I'll be the first to admit, I originally could not find room for this in my head. I rated it low ,2/3. Called it 'subtitle' music. Now... a 6 and , I think , growing. Kinda WORLD MUSIC -like Neat rhythms, soothing 'lyrics' not at all bad.
Art_Carnage wrote:
Oliver needs to buy a vowel.
:roflol:
heeb wrote:
I happen to be married to a beautiful african woman (already happily married for 18 days now!). For our party after our wedding, I had made three CD's with african music from different countries mixed together. The joy and beauty in and of this music is not in chord-changes. The joy and beauty lies in going with the groove, dancing to it, and seeing and enjoying other people dance to it. Man, these african ladies sure know how to shake their respective yanshes ! :moon: :bounce: :goodvibes: :D/ :jump:
Congrats, heeb! I like this music - calming, soothing.
That's kinda a weird album cover. What do you think he's got stashed in his nap-sak? :D/ maybe some more chords? He's not sharing! <-X
drover wrote:
A chord change now and then might be nice.
I happen to be married to a beautiful african woman (already happily married for 18 days now!). For our party after our wedding, I had made three CD's with african music from different countries mixed together. The joy and beauty in and of this music is not in chord-changes. The joy and beauty lies in going with the groove, dancing to it, and seeing and enjoying other people dance to it. Man, these african ladies sure know how to shake their respective yanshes ! :moon: :bounce: :goodvibes: :D/ :jump:
A chord change now and then might be nice. Other than that, decent little ditty.
:bounce: :daisy.gif: :bounce:
Art_Carnage wrote:
Oliver needs to buy a vowel.
LOL, reminds me of this: (click here)
Oliver needs to buy a vowel.
catmaven wrote:
Also, at the risk of sounding politically incorrect, why do I have to venerate every culture? There is some American music I don't care for. If we all liked everything, wouldn't we be pretty undefined?
Don't worry too much about being pc. Cultures aren't sacred, any more than any other human creation. It is respect for individuals, regardless of the terms that define them, that is important. That said, I don't much like this song either. :-)
still very irritating, but at least it's not in extremely high rotation anymore.
:bounce:
More Tuku music please!!! :!: :!:
...Is it OVER yet? :roll:
I just discovered this guy a couple weeks ago and am hooked. Must hear more!
TOtally in philosophical agreement with SuperWeh. Also, at the risk of sounding politically incorrect, why do I have to venerate every culture? There is some American music I don't care for. If we all liked everything, wouldn't we be pretty undefined? This is how this song made me feel: :beat: Now do I get drummed out of Radio Paradise? (By the way, blecch on the subliminally contemptuous, euphemistic term "world music.")
Very, very nice. :bounce:
this is a refreshing break from the rock guitar and screaming lyrics... fits well with the Jamaican music.. sounds tropical.... Good stuff and new to my music diet..
Hannio wrote:
Ah! The noble and innocent child of the forest! (Do people still believe that?)
I think the historic term is 'noble savage'? Personally I don't really believe in it, I am inclined to thinking that qualities such as greed etc are inherently human (have you ever noticed how selfish babies can be? parents have to teach them how not to be selfish...). Reports from travelers that have discovered tribes of noble savages later proved to be highly romanticized/idealized. It's an interesting subject though, is there any real evidence that the noble savage ever really existed?
I have a ton of this stuff from the PUTUMAYO Collection. Really awsome world sounds. :notworthy: :roflol: :music: :guitarist: :roflol: :bounce: :clap:
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain!! I am the Great and Powerful OZ!! Bow to me! :fire:
nice beat :clap:
what a beauty! :bounce:
Originally Posted by FriendRon: The language is Shona and the Shona culture is one of the most wonderful I have encountered in my travels. They are a naturally generous and artistic people who did not have the concept of private property and greed until it was introduced by the Cecil Rhodes and the British.
Ah! The noble and innocent child of the forest! (Do people still believe that?)
Originally Posted by FriendRon: A funny story about Shona. While I taught at the University, my wife took a Shona class. At a faculty reception for us at the end of my term, my wife tried out a beautiful Shona greeting on one of the Black Zimbabwean lecturers. The woman responded to Elizabeth with, "That was beautiful. What language was that?"
Great story Ron, thanks. :cool:
Originally Posted by Cy: Oliver Mtukudzi is Zimbabwean. This song was used in a South African documentary a while back. Here's a link, if you're interested: https://www.cyberplexafrica.com/fingaz/99/stage/archive/991110/view-index.html
I really enjoy this song a lot. Brings back pleasant memories of times gone by, when I was a Guest Lecturer at the University of Zimbabwe in Harare in 1990 (I was active in anti-apartheid politics in the US and one thing led to another). The language is Shona and the Shona culture is one of the most wonderful I have encountered in my travels. They are a naturally generous and artistic people who did not have the concept of private property and greed until it was introduced by the Cecil Rhodes and the British. A funny story about Shona. While I taught at the University, my wife took a Shona class. At a faculty reception for us at the end of my term, my wife tried out a beautiful Shona greeting on one of the Black Zimbabwean lecturers. The woman responded to Elizabeth with, "That was beautiful. What language was that?" Oh well. So you can play this and other Zimbabwean music as much as you like. Also, there are a number of Oregon bands that have taken up Zimbabwean dance music, with perhaps the best being Boca Marimba. Bright Blessings of Peace, -Ron Braithwaite
I like this tune alot. Great for drinking Margaritas on the patio.
Sometimes its' better NOT to know. It is a nice song, but you can hear a sad undertone in his voice. A translation would get his message out!!
Originally Posted by odoggy: According to this article, the song is "lamenting the prevalence of child sexual abuse". I would have never guessed that. It sounded like a happy song to me. Apparently not... The guy has a good first name, though! :D
:??: :??:
Originally Posted by Cy: Oliver Mtukudzi is Zimbabwean. This song was used in a South African documentary a while back. Here's a link, if you're interested: https://www.cyberplexafrica.com/fingaz/99/stage/archive/991110/view-index.html
According to this article, the song is "lamenting the prevalence of child sexual abuse". I would have never guessed that. It sounded like a happy song to me. Apparently not... The guy has a good first name, though! :D
Originally Posted by the_jake: I also am curious to the language in this tune. Still enjoy the song, but it's meaning eludes me. Singing in tongues ;)
Oliver Mtukudzi is Zimbabwean. This song was used in a South African documentary a while back. Here's a link, if you're interested: https://www.cyberplexafrica.com/fingaz/99/stage/archive/991110/view-index.html
I also am curious to the language in this tune. Still enjoy the song, but it\'s meaning eludes me. Singing in tongues ;)
:??: :??: So, does ANYONE know what Tapindwa Nei means? Someone gimme a clue ... pleeeease ...
The best of world music too-nice
agreed, Major! i have heard enough of this one.