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Paul Simon — Under African Skies
Album: Graceland
Avg rating:
7.6

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1373









Released: 1986
Length: 3:27
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Joseph's face was black as night
The pale yellow moon shone in his eyes
His path was marked by the stars in the southern hemisphere
And he walked his days under African skies

This is the story of how we begin to remember
This is the powerful pulsing of love in the veins
After the dream of falling and calling your name out
These are the roots of rhythm and the roots of rhythm remain

In early memory, mission music was ringing around my nursery door
I said, "Take this child, Lord, from Tucson, Arizona
Give her the wings to fly from harm
And she won't bother you no more"

This is the story of how we begin to remember
This is the powerful pulsing of love in the veins
After the dream of falling and calling your name out
These are the roots of rhythm and the roots of rhythm remain

A-oom-ba-oom-ba-oom-ba-Oooooooooooooh
A-oom-ba-oom-ba-oom-ba-Oooooooooooooh
A-oom-ba-oom-ba-oom-ba-Oooooooooooooh
A-oom-ba-oom-ba-oom-ba-Oooooooooooooh

Joseph's face was as black as the night
And the pale yellow moon shone in his eyes
His path was marked by the stars in the southern hemisphere
And he walked the length of his days under African skies
Comments (120)add comment
Don't get any better!
 murdog wrote:
Paul Simon is the greatest American songwriter in my opinion. So many phases, all favourites, that were each groundbreaking, well-crafted, and uplifting. Let's celebrate him while he lives on; I'm still grieving losing Petty.
 

He's certainly one of the very top few.
Does NOT get any better than Paul Simon........then and now!
How 'bout that bass!
 Mugro wrote:
badgerbunny wrote:
Oh dear I'm gonna make myself popular here then...... Another great white hunter raping Africa...and they're still at it, I think Blur have just gotten down in the dust to do a bit of musical gold digging.......this sanitisation of traditional music leaves me cold and its just so odd that the these mighty musical giants end up doing this in an attempt to revive their flagging careers. I just can't help thinking it would all sound so much better without their banal contributions.
Your post underscores the point that I have often made in these posts. You really need to take politics out of this and enjoy the music. Sometimes we take ourselves so seriously that we begin to judge other people so harshly that we lose sight of what is a lovely song. This is what organized religion (Christians, Jews and Muslims) seem to be getting so wrong today and seemingly throughout history. So....GETCHER POLITICS OFF MY (Paul's) MUSIC!!!!
 
I love that Paul Simon introduced me to Ladysmith Black Mambosa. A whole different genre of music for me. If what he did with this album was to enlarge our knowledge of beautiful music outside of our traditional American experience, then he did a lot.
 rdo wrote:
Simon and Garfunkel = Great

Simon solo = Good

Simon and Ronstadt = Trascendent
 

An umlaut, umlaut, umlaut Ohohhhhhh.
Tomorrow night I'm going to see a group called the London African Gospel Choir perform all of Graceland. This will be the second time I've seen them do it - they are electric. Highly recommended if you get the chance to see it!
Paul Simon is the greatest American songwriter in my opinion. So many phases, all favourites, that were each groundbreaking, well-crafted, and uplifting. Let's celebrate him while he lives on; I'm still grieving losing Petty.
Heck, I like Linda's harmony vocals better than Garfunkle's.
If you like the way the rhythms play against each other in this song, try just about anything on Tony Allen's Secret Agent album. The master drummer of Afrobeat created a brilliant solo album.
 Chwkbud wrote:
Have long felt this was the best musical album to come out of the 80's. Still brilliant and so listenable, engaging. An amazing blend of musical styles, influences, musicians, and lyrics by a master.

 

I agree,  timeless and brilliant!
Have long felt this was the best musical album to come out of the 80's. Still brilliant and so listenable, engaging. An amazing blend of musical styles, influences, musicians, and lyrics by a master.
I completely understand having go-to albums for helping a fretful child rest; this album holds dual status as that, and as family road trip music. A serious complement, to my mind.
I had trouble getting my son to go to sleep when he was an infant. The only way I could do it was by playing Graceland and dancing him to sleep.  I have listened to this album HUNDREDS of time from start to finish.  I still love every second of it!!!
Oh my God I'm becoming  a siamese.
A-oom-ba-oom-ba-oom-ba-Ooo
oHH free of your lies.
This entire album should be called "Concentrated Brilliance". It is a fine piece of art and it remains fine all these years on. 
Every now and then you suddenly hear a song differently. It's like you hear it with a part of your brain that hadn't noticed it before. Despite having heard this a thousand times it's only this morning that I really appreciated what a full sound is created by just the two lines of guitar and bass in the intro. I suppose it often takes a long time to appreciate the simplest things.
Surely one of the most beautiful, touching, well-sung and perfect songs ever...the way their voices dance and blend is astonishing still.
In early memory, mission music was ringing around my nursery door
I said, "Take this child, Lord, from Tucson, Arizona
Give her the wings to fly from harm
And she won't bother you no more"
What an album.
Loved this album since I was a kid.  Love it even more since seeing it played cover to cover live in Hyde Park in 2012.  God damn that was a good concert.
 planet3one9 wrote:
Does anyone hear  Juluka's "Scatterlings of Africa" in the intro of the song like I do?
 
I hear Johnny Clegg in my head every time Graceland is played. Clegg is more pop, but for me he comes closer to the real thing.
 wtango wrote:
Top 10 album all time for me.  Brilliant!

 
I have to agree.  It's an incredible album.
 hallogallo wrote:

Great tune from an amazing album.  Such a voice from Linda.  

Graceland really opened a music door for me.

 

 
{#Dancingbanana_2}  Toedilly...
I can actually feel the sunshine and joy in this song. This is simply a superb effort...Graceland for lunch...
Top 10 album all time for me.  Brilliant!
Wow, the PSD button really nailed it with this song.  Maybe BillG could help out Netflix with their recommendations - they are very hit or miss!
Funky tone on the bass; sounds just like the powerful pulsing of love in the veins.
oh boy
Simon and Garfunkel = Great

Simon solo = Good

Everybody in my churches loves this song...  and this whole album...
 
Does anyone hear  Juluka's "Scatterlings of Africa" in the intro of the song like I do?
Bet you the hifi feed from Bill is better quality.

 

Montysano wrote:
Just bought the 180 gram vinyl reissue.  Amazing!
 


Just bought the 180 gram vinyl reissue.  Amazing!
 (former member) wrote:

I agree...  love this whole album...

 
 

I concur, most brilliant album, and wish I could have seen the reunion
Brilliant

Great tune from an amazing album.  Such a voice from Linda.  

Graceland really opened a music door for me.

 
 Baketown wrote:
 

Just Brilliant !!

 
I agree...  love this whole album...

 
 

Just Brilliant !!




Absolutely magnificent...  volume just went wayyyy up...


That album is as good today as it was the first time I heard it.  Timeless.


 jjbix wrote:
this song and most of paul simon's work sounds TRITE!
 
Overused and consequently of little import; lacking originality or freshness

Surely you jest? Overused?

Joseph's face was black as night
The pale yellow moon shone in his eyes

His path was marked
By the stars in the southern hemisphere

And he walked his days
Under african skies
This is the story of how we begin to remember
This is the powerful pulsing of love in the vein
After the dream of falling and calling your name out

These are the roots of rhythm
And the roots of rhythm remain

..... like these are images in every other song
 
Paul Simon with Linda Ronstadt on backing vocals is a pretty darn good combination.

Too beautiful for words
literally timeless


Hugh Masekela with Paul Simon performig Live:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHny1UyjXQU


I really love Linda ronstadt's backing vocals in this song.

 Cachatons wrote:
meower wrote:
When I was a kid I wanted to grow up to be Linda Ronstadt, I think it was those roller skates on the living in the USA album

sure it wasn't the shorts?

This calls for clarification!
https://lp-covers.blogspot.com/2007/07/linda-ronstadt-living-in-usa.html
I don't see much of any shorts in that second picture.

(I can't quite bring myself to call it "the back cover")



This song is good for the ears...


{#Dancingbanana}
this song and most of paul simon's work sounds TRITE!
 mgkiwi wrote:
Hated then, hate it now - {#Puke}
 

Not quite sure how you can hate this song. Not like it, of course. Prefer to listen to something else, OK. But hate it?
 Misterfixit wrote:
Remember the flak he took over Kodachrome? Like his home town was going to take down the "Paul Simon Slept Here" sign.
 

This is news to me. Care to elaborate?
 leathepea wrote:
I love this whole album!!!!
 

Ditto. Same with Rhythm of the Saints. I somehow feel PS is actually underrated as an extraordinary musician/songwriter of the last 4 decades
 mgkiwi wrote:
Hated then, hate it now - {#Puke}
 

Yeah, but you like Pink Floyd, so.
I love this whole album!!!!
Hated then, hate it now - {#Puke}
10 for the music, the band and the vocal accompanist.
This guy really knows the formula for success.
{#Notworthy}
Misterfixit wrote:
Remember the flak he took over Kodachrome? Like his home town was going to take down the "Paul Simon Slept Here" sign.
No, I don't remember that. What happened?
Everything on this album get a 10 for me. I believe this is one of the best ablums of all time. Ray LaMontagne's Trouble album
Dah-um-ba-um-ba-um-ba-ooooh Great, that's in my head all day. Guess there are worse things to sign aloud, right?
Remember the flak he took over Kodachrome? Like his home town was going to take down the "Paul Simon Slept Here" sign.
Cachatons wrote:
sure it wasn't the shorts?
It was her boobs most likely.
String Cheese Incident plays a great cover of this live. Worth checking out if you are into that kind of thing.
broohaha wrote:
I recall the members of Ladysmith Black Mambazo took quite a bit of offense over the accusations laid on Paul Simon for bringing their music to the western mainstream. They argued that if there's any sort of exploitation going on, it would be them exploiting Simon.
And PS is very popular in South Africa. Having seen Ladysmith live some years back in Oz, all I can say is thank you Mr. Simon. Similarly, his bringing of superb South American players into his Saints project opened up new musical vistas for millions of unknowing listeners. There is an ongoing argument from purists here for the playing of didjeridoo (yidarki) in Australia. The politically correct say not even women should touch it, let alone white folk. Yet it now graces concerts halls, opens Olympics, is found on great dub mixes, has Japanese masters coming here to study with the elders deep in sacred outback country. Welcome to the world of music!
I can't work when music from this album is playing...it's too good.
meower215 wrote:
When I was a kid I wanted to grow up to be Linda Ronstadt, I think it was those roller skates on the living in the USA album
sure it wasn't the shorts?
When I was a kid I wanted to grow up to be Linda Ronstadt, I think it was those roller skates on the living in the USA album
I thought the story went something like: Simon's previous album, "Hearts and Bones" had pretty much cratered. Subsequently takes his interest in music from the African continent, along with some low sales expectations, and does something for himself. Subsequently, the album catches fire, etc. Didn't really do it to rescue his career, just tried to pay his best homage. markw wrote:
Yeah, that's one way to look at it, and Simon took a ton of shit for it when it came out. He essentially pasted his English-major lyrics on top of some existing Mbaqanga records. But what really ended up happening was the beginning of the World Music boom and in particular an intense interest in the various musical styles of Africa that continues today. Thank you Mr. Simon. That music was obscure to the world before you tried to rescue your flagging career. One of the most worthwhile of such rescues I've ever witnessed. By the way, it does sound incredibly better in its original form, which you can hear on an anthology called Zulu Jive. But how would you have ever heard of it without Simon's exposure? One should also remember that Mbaqanga was heavily influenced by western pop from the 50s and 60s, so there you go. The electric guitar didn't originate in Africa, now did it?! I wouldn't complain too much.
I like Paul Simon but I never could get into this LP.I've tried but it's not one for me...
trekhead wrote:
Anyone pick up on a RUSTED ROOT opening sequence?
You mean that they got it from HIM?
Anyone pick up on a RUSTED ROOT opening sequence?
One of my favorite songs, but I got stuck on it long before hearing the original. Someone arranged it for the WildCats, a Princeton a capella group... theirs is a much tighter version than this, but also wonderfully melodic. And catchy.
dave216j wrote:
Just a quick note to Bill, that the run since I just sat down at my desk (Jimmy Cliff - Otis Redding - Taj Mahal - Youssou N'dour - Paul Simon) is the epitome of Radio Paradise at its best. Some of those are songs I've long considered favorites, others I've only heard here once or twice, but they flow together beautifully and comprise the ephemeral idea of eclectic music without being random for the sake of randomness. Perfect.
Yes indeed! This is what used to happen before rock and radio went corporate, when a DJ could program his own show according to his own love and knowledge of music. Bill's ability to build a playlist is better than the best, a rare and under-appreciated talent. I hope there are some future DJs out there paying attention.
badgerbunny wrote:
Oh dear I'm gonna make myself popular here then...... Another great white hunter raping Africa...and they're still at it, I think Blur have just gotten down in the dust to do a bit of musical gold digging.......this sanitisation of traditional music leaves me cold and its just so odd that the these mighty musical giants end up doing this in an attempt to revive their flagging careers. I just can't help thinking it would all sound so much better without their banal contributions.
Yeah, that's one way to look at it, and Simon took a ton of shit for it when it came out. He essentially pasted his English-major lyrics on top of some existing Mbaqanga records. But what really ended up happening was the beginning of the World Music boom and in particular an intense interest in the various musical styles of Africa that continues today. Thank you Mr. Simon. That music was obscure to the world before you tried to rescue your flagging career. One of the most worthwhile of such rescues I've ever witnessed. By the way, it does sound incredibly better in its original form, which you can hear on an anthology called Zulu Jive. But how would you have ever heard of it without Simon's exposure? One should also remember that Mbaqanga was heavily influenced by western pop from the 50s and 60s, so there you go. The electric guitar didn't originate in Africa, now did it?! I wouldn't complain too much.
dave216j wrote:
Just a quick note to Bill, that the run since I just sat down at my desk (Jimmy Cliff - Otis Redding - Taj Mahal - Youssou N'dour - Paul Simon) is the epitome of Radio Paradise at its best. Some of those are songs I've long considered favorites, others I've only heard here once or twice, but they flow together beautifully and comprise the ephemeral idea of eclectic music without being random for the sake of randomness. Perfect.
Here, Here. :clap:
Just a quick note to Bill, that the run since I just sat down at my desk (Jimmy Cliff - Otis Redding - Taj Mahal - Youssou N'dour - Paul Simon) is the epitome of Radio Paradise at its best. Some of those are songs I've long considered favorites, others I've only heard here once or twice, but they flow together beautifully and comprise the ephemeral idea of eclectic music without being random for the sake of randomness. Perfect.
Oh wow, this song takes me back to the some of my earlier misspent days in Charlottesville, Virginia. Good times... Good times...
We sang this one in our music lessons... Don't like it that good when I listen to it, but it's just a wonderful feeling when you sing it...
Roverfish wrote:
Yay, Tucson! Must be why Linda Ronstadt is singing. Great tune! :clap:
Oh hi, you're still here after all that political commentary? Remarkable. Very nice song from Mr. Simon.
ptooey wrote:
This song's an 8. The album's a 12. :nodhead:
Too right :sunny:
Love the bass!
This...is...musical...perfection (to my ears!). 10. The harmonies, the percussion, the bass...everything...My day is brighter hearing this in my headphones.
Funny what'll trigger some people. Good tune, an 8.
This song's an 8. The album's a 12. :nodhead:
Mugro wrote:
Your post underscores the point that I have often made in these posts. You really need to take politics out of this and enjoy the music. So....GETCHER POLITICS OFF MY (Paul's) MUSIC!!!!
Thanks for that!
badgerbunny wrote:
Oh dear I'm gonna make myself popular here then...... Another great white hunter raping Africa...and they're still at it, I think Blur have just gotten down in the dust to do a bit of musical gold digging.......this sanitisation of traditional music leaves me cold and its just so odd that the these mighty musical giants end up doing this in an attempt to revive their flagging careers. I just can't help thinking it would all sound so much better without their banal contributions.
Your post underscores the point that I have often made in these posts. You really need to take politics out of this and enjoy the music. Sometimes we take ourselves so seriously that we begin to judge other people so harshly that we lose sight of what is a lovely song. This is what organized religion (Christians, Jews and Muslims) seem to be getting so wrong today and seemingly throughout history. So....GETCHER POLITICS OFF MY (Paul's) MUSIC!!!!
mig7 wrote:
One of the Top 10 Albums of all time.
Hell yeah. Don't think I've left home without this album in years.
I recall the members of Ladysmith Black Mambazo took quite a bit of offense over the accusations laid on Paul Simon for bringing their music to the western mainstream. They argued that if there's any sort of exploitation going on, it would be them exploiting Simon. veegez wrote:
Rape? Well, that might be overstating it a bit. Musicians should be free to explore whatever style of music that exists on the planet, without being accused of raping a culture or a society. After all, is there really any truly original music out there anymore? When you think about it, it's all about which style is being copied nowadays. I believe that Paul genuinely liked this music so much that it drove him to create "Graceland". Now, was there some degree of calculation in regards to what positive effect it could have on Paul's "flagging" career? Most likely. Also, you are right. The music could have been done better by musicians originating from the culture that it represented. But let's not go completely overboard with the hunter and rape stuff. ;)
rulebritannia wrote:
Interesting insight, Elysiana, but I have a different take on the outcome. If, for example, Gershwin, Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan were exported to an outside world that had rarely heard them, kicking off a revivial in the West, that would be pretty cool. If, on the other hand, the music was the Ohio Express, there could be a problem. From my perspective, Simon derived his album from very cool music. Today this album is less appealling to me, but that's largely because after his intro I made a point to go back to the richer original sources. In my book, the exposure he gave the the locals made a tremendous contribution. And surely, by now, the music has once again grown and evolved.
A much better take, rb. :)
elysiana wrote:
ultimately, this album would be like having a south african artist come to the U.S. and enjoy our 'quaint' music. then head home, make an album with mixtures of frank sinatra or any other form of music from the 50s, and market it as 'current US culture'. my friends from south africa smile when they hear this then roll their eyes. this is not current south african culture. in fact they have told me that its release caused south african musical culture to go back 40 years and revisit this form without fullying evolving and creating its modern forms. not only did paul make a load of money off of this but he helped infantalize a culture and turn it into a cultural keepsake for outsiders. since we have this album we no longer feel responsible to further understand the complexities of a culture, paul did it all for us. sorry for the ramblings. a liberal arts degree has to be good for something.
Apparently, you missed a lot of classes.
elysiana wrote:
ultimately, this album would be like having a south african artist come to the U.S. and enjoy our 'quaint' music. then head home, make an album with mixtures of frank sinatra or any other form of music from the 50s, and market it as 'current US culture'. my friends from south africa smile when they hear this then roll their eyes. this is not current south african culture. in fact they have told me that its release caused south african musical culture to go back 40 years and revisit this form without fullying evolving and creating its modern forms. not only did paul make a load of money off of this but he helped infantalize a culture and turn it into a cultural keepsake for outsiders. since we have this album we no longer feel responsible to further understand the complexities of a culture, paul did it all for us.
Interesting insight, Elysiana, but I have a different take on the outcome. If, for example, Gershwin, Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan were exported to an outside world that had rarely heard them, kicking off a revivial in the West, that would be pretty cool. If, on the other hand, the music was the Ohio Express, there could be a problem. From my perspective, Simon derived his album from very cool music. Today this album is less appealling to me, but that's largely because after his intro I made a point to go back to the richer original sources. In my book, the exposure he gave the the locals made a tremendous contribution. And surely, by now, the music has once again grown and evolved.
Paul Simon left me behind when he made his trip to Africa, I guess.....never have appreciated his stuff since then....
mig7 wrote:
One of the Top 10 Albums of all time.
Agreed!
One of the Top 10 Albums of all time.
downbylaw wrote:
someone else sees it! i wrote basically the same thing about another simon song. and people thought elvis was bad...
Wow--it's just a song, really, isn't it?
Had this song running through my head as I explored ancient religious sites in Ethiopia... what a great song.
elysiana wrote:
ultimately, this album would be like having a south african artist come to the U.S. and enjoy our 'quaint' music. then head home, make an album with mixtures of frank sinatra or any other form of music from the 50s, and market it as 'current US culture'. my friends from south africa smile when they hear this then roll their eyes. this is not current south african culture. in fact they have told me that its release caused south african musical culture to go back 40 years and revisit this form without fullying evolving and creating its modern forms. not only did paul make a load of money off of this but he helped infantalize a culture and turn it into a cultural keepsake for outsiders. since we have this album we no longer feel responsible to further understand the complexities of a culture, paul did it all for us. sorry for the ramblings. a liberal arts degree has to be good for something.
Thanks for enlighten us, But I believe than an artist has the right to present his interpretation of whatever music he likes. Even the Beatles did that with Indian Music.
ultimately, this album would be like having a south african artist come to the U.S. and enjoy our 'quaint' music. then head home, make an album with mixtures of frank sinatra or any other form of music from the 50s, and market it as 'current US culture'. my friends from south africa smile when they hear this then roll their eyes. this is not current south african culture. in fact they have told me that its release caused south african musical culture to go back 40 years and revisit this form without fullying evolving and creating its modern forms. not only did paul make a load of money off of this but he helped infantalize a culture and turn it into a cultural keepsake for outsiders. since we have this album we no longer feel responsible to further understand the complexities of a culture, paul did it all for us. sorry for the ramblings. a liberal arts degree has to be good for something.
I just got this album a couple of weeks ago, I was not mature enough in the eighties to appreciate this music. I am totally amazed about it, wonderful blend of music, I like Adrian Belew playing the sinthetized guitars.
someone else sees it! i wrote basically the same thing about another simon song. and people thought elvis was bad... badgerbunny wrote:
Oh dear I'm gonna make myself popular here then...... Another great white hunter raping Africa...and they're still at it, I think Blur have just gotten down in the dust to do a bit of musical gold digging.......this sanitisation of traditional music leaves me cold and its just so odd that the these mighty musical giants end up doing this in an attempt to revive their flagging careers. I just can't help thinking it would all sound so much better without their banal contributions.
A political hot potoatoe? (spell courtesy of D. Quayle) I think not....this is such a great song from such a great album. So Paul Simon went down to South Africa and integrated that country's music, rhythms and musicians into his Graceland album. More power to him...it brought a new genre to so many people around the world who had their ears opened...and hopefully went out and bought the original artist's music as well. This particular track is a fav...and it played non-stop around Koh Samui in 1987! Ah...good memories.
FeatFanMike wrote:
I don't think Paulie and Artie get along these days.
I hope they do as we're going to see them in concert next week.
Yummy :sunny.gif:
:clap: I love this whole CD anytime of the day. Sure touches my spirit. :nodhead: Thanks Bill
Originally Posted by philarktos: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: The entire history of human culture, when you get right down to it, is the history of the dissimilation, through "copying", of novel ways of going about things.
Well said. I totallly agree. :)
Originally Posted by veegez: Musicians should be free to explore whatever style of music that exists on the planet, without being accused of raping a culture or a society. After all, is there really any truly original music out there anymore? When you think about it, it's all about which style is being copied nowadays.
:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: The entire history of human culture, when you get right down to it, is the history of the dissimilation, through "copying", of novel ways of going about things.
Originally Posted by badgerbunny: Oh dear I'm gonna make myself popular here then...... Another great white hunter raping Africa...and they're still at it, I think Blur have just gotten down in the dust to do a bit of musical gold digging.......this sanitisation of traditional music leaves me cold and its just so odd that the these mighty musical giants end up doing this in an attempt to revive their flagging careers. I just can't help thinking it would all sound so much better without their banal contributions.
Oh dear. I'm only surprised that the "cultural appropriation" issue hasn't been raised here before. I've been wrestling with this one ever since the Vancouver Lesbian and Gay Choir, with which I sang, caught all kind of "politically correct" hell for singing some South African "Freedom Songs". Seems that as privileged North American mostly whites, however historically oppressed, we had no right. Associated with our critics were those who were offering to facilitate "unlearning racism" workshops, at a price. Can't see how Ladysmith Black Mambazo, who would never have had their international career otherwise, were "raped" by their collaberation with Simon. Seems to me that many North Americans who have been introduced to traditional music in this way, have gone on to explore the music of original traditional musicians. It has also paved the way for really exciting creative cross cultural hybrids like AfroCelt.
Originally Posted by badgerbunny: Oh dear I'm gonna make myself popular here then...... Another great white hunter raping Africa...and they're still at it, I think Blur have just gotten down in the dust to do a bit of musical gold digging.......this sanitisation of traditional music leaves me cold and its just so odd that the these mighty musical giants end up doing this in an attempt to revive their flagging careers. I just can't help thinking it would all sound so much better without their banal contributions.
Rape? Well, that might be overstating it a bit. Musicians should be free to explore whatever style of music that exists on the planet, without being accused of raping a culture or a society. After all, is there really any truly original music out there anymore? When you think about it, it's all about which style is being copied nowadays. I believe that Paul genuinely liked this music so much that it drove him to create "Graceland". Now, was there some degree of calculation in regards to what positive effect it could have on Paul's "flagging" career? Most likely. Also, you are right. The music could have been done better by musicians originating from the culture that it represented. But let's not go completely overboard with the hunter and rape stuff. ;)
Yay, Tucson! Must be why Linda Ronstadt is singing. Great tune! :clap:
Originally Posted by dmax: Her powerful bellowing (as tunal as it is) is out of place with his soft tone. If she were missing, I'd be happy. Maybe Artie coulda done that better?
I don't think Paulie and Artie get along these days.
Originally Posted by el_kadiri: That's Linda Rondstadt? Wow... This is a beautiful song.
Her powerful bellowing (as tunal as it is) is out of place with his soft tone. If she were missing, I'd be happy. Maybe Artie coulda done that better?
I was lucky enough to see Ladysmith Black Mambazo (the South African gentlemen who sing most of the back up on this album) live at my college in undergrad (got to design the poster for it too) and they are INCREDIBLE musicians. Leave it to someone like Paul Simon to tap into such talent. :clap:
Oh dear I\'m gonna make myself popular here then...... Another great white hunter raping Africa...and they\'re still at it, I think Blur have just gotten down in the dust to do a bit of musical gold digging.......this sanitisation of traditional music leaves me cold and its just so odd that the these mighty musical giants end up doing this in an attempt to revive their flagging careers. I just can\'t help thinking it would all sound so much better without their banal contributions.
anything less than a 10 is uncivilized. one of the greatest albums ever recorded. :notworthy: :notworthy:
favourite.album.ever. :notworthy:
This song makes me feel warm and safe.
That\'s Linda Rondstadt? Wow... This is a beautiful song.