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Bob Marley — War
Album: Rastaman Vibration
Avg rating:
7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 830









Released: 1976
Length: 3:23
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Until the philosophy which hold one race
Superior and another inferior
Is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned
Everywhere is war, me say war

That until there are no longer first class
And second class citizens of any nation
Until the color of a man's skin
Is of no more significance than the color of his eyes
Me say war

That until the basic human rights are equally
Guaranteed to all, without regard to race
A dis a war

That until that day
The dream of lasting peace, world citizenship
Rule of international morality
Will remain in but a fleeting illusion
To be pursued, but never attained
Now everywhere is war, war

And until the ignoble and unhappy regimes
That hold our brothers in Angola, in Mozambique
South Africa, sub-human bondage
Have been toppled, utterly destroyed
Well, everywhere is war, me say war

War in the east, war in the west
War up north, war down south
War, war, rumours of war

And until that day, the African continent
Will not know peace, we Africans will fight
We find it necessary and we know we shall win
As we are confident in the victory

Of good over evil, good over evil, good over evil
Good over evil, good over evil, good over evil
Comments (150)add comment

I think I actually chuckled out loud reading the banter down below in the comments on this song.  I had a quick flash to my favorite line in the classic film Dr. Strangelove:  "Gentleman, you can't fight in here.  This is the WAR room!"

I'm at a 9 on this track, the song is a 7 + 2 for the message.  PEACE and Long Live RP! 


Long Live                                                                                                                                      Radio Paradise
To me:                                                                                   8  - Most Excellent          but sadly not more
I hope that day will come.
 That_SOB wrote:

sdn wrote :  "War is bad, mmmmmmkay?" 
If you don't learn from history your condemned to repeat it.
The USA is the most warring country in the world —ever wonder why,  or should we just 'go with the flow doomed to endless repetition?'
Do you really believe you have to support our warring to be a patriot ?  Only the dead die young.



 
There is nothing special about the USA, historically all powerful countries/empires have waged many wars. Currently the USA is the most powerful country and therefore it wages most wars, there is nothing intrinsically different or especially "evil" about the USA.

My obfuscation, really? I made a correction, that is a clarification, just the opposite of an obfuscation. And this correction of your mistake justifies a rant? Geez. Looks like you may be so fond of moral outrage that you see opportunities for such where none exists.

 

midreaming wrote:

 bitbanger wrote:

Nazi's weren't really in Ethiopia during WW2 


really these boards are better when they're about the music. But Ethiopia was a tragedy , and your obfuscation shouldn't stand. First - I may have confused the point. It wasn't Germany specifically, it was an ally - Italy. Instead of Nazis I should have written "Facists". Almost the same thing. Clearly the same intentions.

On October 3, 1935, Italy attacked Ethiopia without a declaration of war. Four days later, the League of Nations declared Italy an aggressor, but as usual, took no action against the country. Italian troops held back until December of that year, when a border incident in the city of Wal Wal gave Italy its much needed excuse to attack Ethiopia. (1)

The remnants of the Italian forces in the AOI surrendered after the Battle of Gondar in November 1941, except for groups that fought the Italian guerrilla war in Ethiopia against the British until the Armistice of Cassibile (3 September 1943) ended hostilities between Italy and the Allies. (2)

as regards the speech and the song, both are documented facts.

(1) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_African_Campaign_(World_War_II)
(2)https://www2.needham.k12.ma.us/nhs/cur/Baker_00/03/baker-mc-03/ethiopia.htm

 

 bitbanger wrote:

Nazi's weren't really in Ethiopia during WW2 


really these boards are better when they're about the music. But Ethiopia was a tragedy , and your obfuscation shouldn't stand. First - I may have confused the point. It wasn't Germany specifically, it was an ally - Italy. Instead of Nazis I should have written "Facists". Almost the same thing. Clearly the same intentions.

On October 3, 1935, Italy attacked Ethiopia without a declaration of war. Four days later, the League of Nations declared Italy an aggressor, but as usual, took no action against the country. Italian troops held back until December of that year, when a border incident in the city of Wal Wal gave Italy its much needed excuse to attack Ethiopia. (1)

The remnants of the Italian forces in the AOI surrendered after the Battle of Gondar in November 1941, except for groups that fought the Italian guerrilla war in Ethiopia against the British until the Armistice of Cassibile (3 September 1943) ended hostilities between Italy and the Allies. (2)

as regards the speech and the song, both are documented facts.

(1) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_African_Campaign_(World_War_II)
(2)https://www2.needham.k12.ma.us/nhs/cur/Baker_00/03/baker-mc-03/ethiopia.htm

Nazi's weren't really in Ethiopia during WW2

midreaming wrote:


how bout the fact that H.S is beilieved to be the direct decendant of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheeba, ancient rulers from the tenth century BC and that his speech was delivered to the General Assembly of the UN asking for help to rebuild his country (Ethiopia) after Nazi's detroyed it in WWII.  'Song still too simple for you?

 


 CaffeineSam wrote:

Doesn't that make it even more simplistic?

I think you kind of ruined the song for me.

I'll just go listen to Haile Selassie speeches from now on... 

 
how bout the fact that H.S is beilieved to be the direct decendant of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheeba, ancient rulers from the tenth century BC and that his speech was delivered to the General Assembly of the UN asking for help to rebuild his country (Ethiopia) after Nazi's detroyed it in WWII.  'Song still too simple for you?
 scrubbrush wrote:


Simplistic? Bob took a speech from Haile Selassie. Hardly changed a single word, put music to it, and sang it. It's one of the most impressive songs i know of.

 
Doesn't that make it even more simplistic?

I think you kind of ruined the song for me.

I'll just go listen to Haile Selassie speeches from now on... 
 scrubbrush wrote:


Simplistic? Bob took a speech from Haile Selassie. Hardly changed a single word, put music to it, and sang it. It's one of the most impressive songs i know of.

 
cool factoid. tangentially connected.. the carved rock churches of ethiopia's orthodox christians are worth checking out. 
 Art_Carnage wrote:
Simplistic claptrap.

 

Simplistic? Bob took a speech from Haile Selassie. Hardly changed a single word, put music to it, and sang it. It's one of the most impressive songs i know of.
 freddyfender wrote:
 Art_Carnage wrote:
Simplistic claptrap.


You know what Texans are called......  TexAsholes; and this comment just solidifies that sentiment!

 
Geez, guy makes a comment about the music and you come back with a personal attack. What is that all about!
 Art_Carnage wrote:
Simplistic claptrap.


You know what Texans are called......  TexAsholes; and this comment just solidifies that sentiment!

Everybody in my church loves this song...

 lattalo wrote:
The 5th commandment for the Roman Catholic religion states; Thou shalt not kill The 5th commandment for the Lutheran religion states; Thou shalt not murder The 6th commandment for Jewish, Orthodox, and Anglican, Reformed, and other Christian religions states; Thou shalt not murder There is no exceptions stated.


Have you actually read the Old Testament?  Just curious.  Much of it is devoted to the conquest of Canaan.  The character YHWH (aka God) commands the wholesale slaughter of the indigenous inhabitants of Canaan in no uncertain terms.  This injunction is repeated over and over and over again, and carried out to a tee.  Failure to comply to this commandment is punishable by death.  Read it if you don't believe me.  Today, in the 2012th year of our Lord, we have a term for this.  That term is genocide. 
ich bin froh , daß es solche Menschen wie Bob Marley gab, es gibt Ihn noch immer   Ihr hört es . Bob macht seinen Job {#Notworthy}
 Art_Carnage wrote:
Simplistic claptrap.
 

{#Lol}{#Rolleyes}
 peacockangel wrote:
the king's words ~ know your history
 
Know your history ... or be condemned to repeat it again ... {#Meditate}
Bob you trying to say something there ?
the king's words ~ know your history
Simplistic claptrap.

Bob Marley - 12Caras Series by *artcova
©2009-2010 *artcova

7th portrait of this series. Graphic tablet in photoshop. Custom brush used, you can find it linked to one of the portraits of this series. ;)



First time I hear this studio version ... Superb .... 
Literally sends chills up my spine.

Bob Marley - "War" Live  

"  "War" is a song recorded and made popular by Bob Marley. It first appeared on Bob Marley and the Wailers' 1976 Island Records album, Rastaman Vibration, Marley's only album to chart in the USA, at #10. The lyrics are almost literally derived from a speech made by Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I before the United Nations General Assembly in 1963.
The song is credited to Alan Cole and late Wailers percussionist  Carlton "Carly" Barrett as song writers, and not to Bob Marley. However, based on two simple guitar chords, the semi-improvised, spirited melody put to Selassie's words is unmistakably Marley's.  Barrett's brother and collaborator, Wailer musician Aston "Family Man" Barrett (who created the bass line, key to the song's efficiency) has since brought law suits against the Marley estate for unpaid royalties and credit for songs such as 'War' that were either written by others and not by Bob Marley, or in collaboration with Marley. "  Wikipedia

"What life has taught me
I would like to share with
Those who want to learn...

Until the philosophy which hold one race
Superior and another inferior
Is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned
Everywhere is war, me say war

That until there are no longer first class
And second class citizens of any nation
Until the colour of a man's skin
Is of no more significance than the colour of his eyes
Me say war

That until the basic human rights are equally
Guaranteed to all, without regard to race
Dis a war

That until that day
The dream of lasting peace, world citizenship
Rule of international morality
Will remain in but a fleeting illusion
To be persued, but never attained
Now everywhere is war, war

And until the ignoble and unhappy regimes
that hold our brothers in Angola, in Mozambique,
South Africa sub-human bondage
Have been toppled, utterly destroyed
Well, everywhere is war, me say war

War in the east, war in the west
War up north, war down south
War, war, rumours of war

And until that day, the African continent
Will not know peace, we Africans will fight
We find it necessary and we know we shall win
As we are confident in the victory

Of good over evil, good over evil, good over evil
Good over evil, good over evil, good over evil "

 


** 10 **

.

...And again I will point out that:


WAR IS A RACKET!



MayBaby wrote:
{#Clap} Great post, Andre!

Luv me some Marley. The music and the message.

andrewimft wrote:

Clearly you know nothing about Marley, his career, beliefs or philosophy.

The lyrics are very much intended as an anti-war song, "derived from a speech made by Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I before the United Nations General Assembly in 1963... Haile Selassie 1 gave the speech calling for world peace at the 1963 U.N. Conference in New York City. The song uses part of Selassie's speech that calls for equality among all without regard to race, class, or nationality in his hymnal cry for peace... It also asserts, quoting Selassie directly, that until the day of an equal society, there will be war... In the original speech, Selassie urged U.N. officials and country representatives, to disarm their nuclear weapons and to end international exploitation (specifically with Africa). The song honors Haile Selassie I while calling for action against racial inequality and international injustice."

The song quotes much of Selassie's speech (most of the info I'm referencing is at the link here, you can read the rest of his speech that is in the song there). Regarding this part of the speech, "We Africans will fight, if necessary, and we know that we shall win, as we are confident in the victory of good over evil... Selassie reminded his listeners that these are only words; their value depends wholly on our will to observe and honour them and give them content and meaning." That's an anti war song citing prophecy about wars and rumors of war, and Selassie's anti war speech.

Junior Marvin, former Wailers guitarist in an interview at reggae-vibes.com, also verifies the song's anti war meaning. He says this about the meaning of the song War: "Like 'War,' America's at war," points out Marvin. Marley borrowed the lyrics to 'War' from a speech Haile Selassie I (aka Ras Tafari) gave to the United Nations.

"I think the time has come for a big peace movement, which is what Bob started then, 'movement of Jah people,' the One Love Peace Concert in Jamaica," says Marvin. "9/11 was a wake up call for everyone on the planet and now we've gotta learn from that."

"Cultures should work together and share knowledge," says Marvin, "rather than 'tearing each other's throats out.'"

"In the long run, it's gonna be beneficial to everyone to just chill out," he adds.

That's just the tip of the overwhelming evidence about Marley and his career, beliefs and message that have nothing to do with your bizarre interpretation. Bob Marley's entire career was opposed to the very ideas you spout about using religion to justify war, the record is long and available to examine.

Your post is inaccurate and full of some weird right wing Christianist pro war agenda. You're free to make that interpretation of the song for your own personal meaning, but don't go around ascribing it to Marley. Your kind of agenda laden ignorance and dishonest, aggressive revisionist history just leaves me without words to describe how bizarre and annoying it is.




Here here Andrew! Props, MayBaby! {#Cowboy}
{#Clap} Great post, Andre!

Luv me some Marley. The music and the message.

andrewimft wrote:

Clearly you know nothing about Marley, his career, beliefs or philosophy.

The lyrics are very much intended as an anti-war song, "derived from a speech made by Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I before the United Nations General Assembly in 1963... Haile Selassie 1 gave the speech calling for world peace at the 1963 U.N. Conference in New York City. The song uses part of Selassie's speech that calls for equality among all without regard to race, class, or nationality in his hymnal cry for peace... It also asserts, quoting Selassie directly, that until the day of an equal society, there will be war... In the original speech, Selassie urged U.N. officials and country representatives, to disarm their nuclear weapons and to end international exploitation (specifically with Africa). The song honors Haile Selassie I while calling for action against racial inequality and international injustice."

The song quotes much of Selassie's speech (most of the info I'm referencing is at the link here, you can read the rest of his speech that is in the song there). Regarding this part of the speech, "We Africans will fight, if necessary, and we know that we shall win, as we are confident in the victory of good over evil... Selassie reminded his listeners that these are only words; their value depends wholly on our will to observe and honour them and give them content and meaning." That's an anti war song citing prophecy about wars and rumors of war, and Selassie's anti war speech.

Junior Marvin, former Wailers guitarist in an interview at reggae-vibes.com, also verifies the song's anti war meaning. He says this about the meaning of the song War: "Like 'War,' America's at war," points out Marvin. Marley borrowed the lyrics to 'War' from a speech Haile Selassie I (aka Ras Tafari) gave to the United Nations.

"I think the time has come for a big peace movement, which is what Bob started then, 'movement of Jah people,' the One Love Peace Concert in Jamaica," says Marvin. "9/11 was a wake up call for everyone on the planet and now we've gotta learn from that."

"Cultures should work together and share knowledge," says Marvin, "rather than 'tearing each other's throats out.'"

"In the long run, it's gonna be beneficial to everyone to just chill out," he adds.

That's just the tip of the overwhelming evidence about Marley and his career, beliefs and message that have nothing to do with your bizarre interpretation. Bob Marley's entire career was opposed to the very ideas you spout about using religion to justify war, the record is long and available to examine.

Your post is inaccurate and full of some weird right wing Christianist pro war agenda. You're free to make that interpretation of the song for your own personal meaning, but don't go around ascribing it to Marley. Your kind of agenda laden ignorance and dishonest, aggressive revisionist history just leaves me without words to describe how bizarre and annoying it is.





Equality anthem!  Preach Bob, preach!!!
My sister was on a bus in Eritrea and enjoying all the men in the bus singing what sounded to her like a joyful, happy kind of song. She asked the guy next to her what they were singing:

we are lions off to decapitate our enemies and root out their families

  Kind of killed the mood she said.

sdn wrote :  "War is bad, mmmmmmkay?" 
If you don't learn from history your condemned to repeat it.
The USA is the most warring country in the world —ever wonder why,  or should we just 'go with the flow doomed to endless repetition?'
Do you really believe you have to support our warring to be a patriot ?  Only the dead die young.


 lattalo wrote:


The 5th commandment for the Roman Catholic religion states; Thou shalt not kill

The 5th commandment for the Lutheran religion states; Thou shalt not murder

The 6th commandment for Jewish, Orthodox, and Anglican, Reformed, and other Christian religions states; Thou shalt not murder

There is no exceptions stated.
 

and John Prine wrote :  "Jesus don't like killin' no matter what the reason's for"

nuff said
{#Notworthy}
War is bad, mmmmmmkay?
Bob Marley - War
AC/DC - War Machine

Cue Franky Goes to Hollywood in 5...4..3...
Bob just killed my AC/DC Buzz.  {#Stop}
 99 wrote:
The Crusaders killed but did not murder.

The people they killed would beg to differ, they were murdered for not being a Christian with a sword held to their heads, and that's murder. The children's crusade was another phenomenon long recognized by historians as a low point in all of human history, where little children were taken from their parents' homes and forced into that Crusader army. Just because some religious guy wearing a funny hat and robes says go and kill doesn't make it holy or not murder. Did you flunk history in elementary school?


 99 wrote:
This is not an anti-war song. Bob is saying that people will claim their God given rights by any means necessary.
 
Clearly you know nothing about Marley, his career, beliefs or philosophy.

The lyrics are very much intended as an anti-war song, "derived from a speech made by Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I before the United Nations General Assembly in 1963... Haile Selassie 1 gave the speech calling for world peace at the 1963 U.N. Conference in New York City. The song uses part of Selassie's speech that calls for equality among all without regard to race, class, or nationality in his hymnal cry for peace... It also asserts, quoting Selassie directly, that until the day of an equal society, there will be war... In the original speech, Selassie urged U.N. officials and country representatives, to disarm their nuclear weapons and to end international exploitation (specifically with Africa). The song honors Haile Selassie I while calling for action against racial inequality and international injustice."

The song quotes much of Selassie's speech (most of the info I'm referencing is at the link here, you can read the rest of his speech that is in the song there). Regarding this part of the speech, "We Africans will fight, if necessary, and we know that we shall win, as we are confident in the victory of good over evil... Selassie reminded his listeners that these are only words; their value depends wholly on our will to observe and honour them and give them content and meaning." That's an anti war song citing prophecy about wars and rumors of war, and Selassie's anti war speech.

Junior Marvin, former Wailers guitarist in an interview at reggae-vibes.com, also verifies the song's anti war meaning. He says this about the meaning of the song War: "Like 'War,' America's at war," points out Marvin. Marley borrowed the lyrics to 'War' from a speech Haile Selassie I (aka Ras Tafari) gave to the United Nations.

"I think the time has come for a big peace movement, which is what Bob started then, 'movement of Jah people,' the One Love Peace Concert in Jamaica," says Marvin. "9/11 was a wake up call for everyone on the planet and now we've gotta learn from that."

"Cultures should work together and share knowledge," says Marvin, "rather than 'tearing each other's throats out.'"

"In the long run, it's gonna be beneficial to everyone to just chill out," he adds.

That's just the tip of the overwhelming evidence about Marley and his career, beliefs and message that have nothing to do with your bizarre interpretation. Bob Marley's entire career was opposed to the very ideas you spout about using religion to justify war, the record is long and available to examine.

Your post is inaccurate and full of some weird right wing Christianist pro war agenda. You're free to make that interpretation of the song for your own personal meaning, but don't go around ascribing it to Marley. Your kind of agenda laden ignorance and dishonest, aggressive revisionist history just leaves me without words to describe how bizarre and annoying it is.




99 wrote:
I'm no Hebrew scholar but my understanding is that the Decalogue prohibits that taking of innocent life. War and capital punishment are therefore excepted. The Crusaders killed but did not murder. I think that Marely is similarly justified in this call to arms.
"A life for a life...", Exodus 21: 23-25.
Can never have too much of Bob Marley :) :cheers: Thank you Mr.Bill :crown:
99 wrote:
I'm no Hebrew scholar but my understanding is that the Decalogue prohibits that taking of innocent life. War and capital punishment are therefore excepted. The Crusaders killed but did not murder. I think that Marely is similarly justified in this call to arms.
The 5th commandment for the Roman Catholic religion states; Thou shalt not kill The 5th commandment for the Lutheran religion states; Thou shalt not murder The 6th commandment for Jewish, Orthodox, and Anglican, Reformed, and other Christian religions states; Thou shalt not murder There is no exceptions stated.
99 wrote:
I'm no Hebrew scholar but my understanding is that the Decalogue prohibits that taking of innocent life. War and capital punishment are therefore excepted. The Crusaders killed but did not murder. I think that Marely is similarly justified in this call to arms.
I'm sorry, but the 5th commandment is clear in its statement: No human being is allowed to kill another human being. And there is __no__ exception as far as I know.
maybe not his best - but its as good an anti war song as I've ever heard.
Machine Gun from Hendrix is WAY better than this IMHO.
cc_rider wrote:
Another example: the Ten Commandments decree 'Thou shalt not murder'. But the Crusaders (ancient and modern, but that's another discussion) killed thousands. Catholics and Protestants have killed each other for ages now.
I'm no Hebrew scholar but my understanding is that the Decalogue prohibits that taking of innocent life. War and capital punishment are therefore excepted. The Crusaders killed but did not murder. I think that Marely is similarly justified in this call to arms.
ploafmaster wrote:
1. You don't know that. You suppose it. 2. I think you're confusing hate for his artistic output with hate for the man himself. Maybe some antisocial folks do hate the man himself, but most folks saying they "hate Bob Marley" mean it in the same way as they may hate "The Beach Boys" or whatever - it's the music of the artist, not the people behind it.
1. Quite true, it's a supposition. Based on voluminous anecdotal evidence. 2. Excellent point. As evidenced by the comments, some people simply cannot stand reggae, no matter how hearfelt or sociopolitically accurate the content. c.
99 wrote:
You completely misunderstood the song.
I'm not sure. As long as people refuse to accept each other, as long they hate each other for 'tribal' reasons, there will be war. Humans need to evolve past 'me against my brother; me and my brother against my cousin; me, my brother, and my cousin against my neighbor' and so forth. Example: The Koran forbids a Muslim to kill another Muslim, correct? But Sunni Muslims kill Shia Muslims every day. Arab Muslims kill African Muslims every day. Me against my brother. Another example: the Ten Commandments decree 'Thou shalt not murder'. But the Crusaders (ancient and modern, but that's another discussion) killed thousands. Catholics and Protestants have killed each other for ages now. None of those conflicts show any signs of lessening, occasional sebb and flow notwithstanding. Our basic evolutionary bent toward tribalism must be changed, or else we are doomed. Maybe I didn't phrase it accurately enough the first time. I think Mr. Marley was trying to say that as long as one tribe thinks it is superior to another tribe, as long as one tribe thinks it has the right (or duty) to eradicate another tribe, there will be war. History proves he is correct, sadly. Peace Y'all, c.
rocco1207 wrote:
maybe not his best - but its as good an anti war song as I've ever heard.
This is not an anti-war song. Bob is saying that people will claim their God given rights by any means necessary.
You completely misunderstood the song. cc_rider wrote:
I wish this song was outdated. I wish this song wasn't relevant anymore. I like it a lot, but wish I didn't have to. Yes, if wishes were horses... But still, are we so uncivilized we must KILL each other? Is it beyond the capacity of humans to empathize, at least enough to understand what harm we do to each other? I'm not talking about THIS war (whichever guerre-du-jour you choose, and sadly today's list is long), but wars in general. Why must we (humans) kill each other en masse? What possible purpose does it serve? Thinning the herd, maybe? Makes a powerful case for Darwinism: those humans too backward to accept other humans, are simply killed off, leaving us enlightened folk to carry on (he said, tongue firmly in cheek.) Questions with no answers... c.
MutualDisdain wrote:
RADIO • PARADISE
More Reggae per set than any other station :(
One of many reasons it has such a dedicated following. Peace Y'all, c.
I wish this song was outdated. I wish this song wasn't relevant anymore. I like it a lot, but wish I didn't have to. Yes, if wishes were horses... But still, are we so uncivilized we must KILL each other? Is it beyond the capacity of humans to empathize, at least enough to understand what harm we do to each other? I'm not talking about THIS war (whichever guerre-du-jour you choose, and sadly today's list is long), but wars in general. Why must we (humans) kill each other en masse? What possible purpose does it serve? Thinning the herd, maybe? Makes a powerful case for Darwinism: those humans too backward to accept other humans, are simply killed off, leaving us enlightened folk to carry on (he said, tongue firmly in cheek.) Questions with no answers... c.
RADIO • PARADISE
More Reggae per set than any other station :(
fredriley wrote:
A wee bit over-didactic, IMHO. The lyrics sound like they're written for a propaganda poster, not a reggae song, and come across pretty clunkily. Not one of yer man's best, I don't think.
maybe not his best - but its as good an anti war song as I've ever heard.
A wee bit over-didactic, IMHO. The lyrics sound like they're written for a propaganda poster, not a reggae song, and come across pretty clunkily. Not one of yer man's best, I don't think.
Mandatory excellent
Sinead on SNL: (click here)
jlind wrote:
That's actually a hard choice for me, want to vomit 24/7 because my rights are being quickly stripped away, or because I have to listen to this crap... This might be worse.
You HAVE to be kidding me, this song is all about equal rights and not having war. Maybe you should vomit because of your overabundance of ignorance.
Jimi_the_Saint wrote:
I remember the first time I heard this song. Actually, it was the Sinead O'Conner version on SNL when she ripped the picture of the Pope. That was the most powerful thing I had ever seen on TV (I was fairly young). It shocked me to the point of finding out what the song was, what the lyrics said, etc. That's how I discovered Bob Marley. Thanks, Sinead!
ME TOO!! I like to remind people of that when I hear them rip on Sinead for doing reggae. She's is Rasta to the core!
greenighs wrote:
The lyric is taken from Haile Selassie's Address To The United Nations in 1963. (click here) Er, ah, already observed by ziggy. oops.
Well let's face it a good effort from Ras Tafari but he sowed the seeds for the dreadfulness of Mengitsu and the famines of Ethiopia
I remember the first time I heard this song. Actually, it was the Sinead O'Conner version on SNL when she ripped the picture of the Pope. That was the most powerful thing I had ever seen on TV (I was fairly young). It shocked me to the point of finding out what the song was, what the lyrics said, etc. That's how I discovered Bob Marley. Thanks, Sinead!
bev wrote:
What life has taught me I would like to share with Those who want to learn...
The lyric is taken from Haile Selassie's Address To The United Nations in 1963. (click here) Er, ah, already observed by ziggy. oops.
What life has taught me I would like to share with Those who want to learn... Until the philosophy which hold one race Superior and another inferior Is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned Everywhere is war, me say war That until there are no longer first class And second class citizens of any nation Until the colour of a man's skin Is of no more significance than the colour of his eyes Me say war That until the basic human rights are equally Guaranteed to all, without regard to race Dis a war That until that day The dream of lasting peace, world citizenship Rule of international morality Will remain in but a fleeting illusion To be persued, but never attained Now everywhere is war, war And until the ignoble and unhappy regimes that hold our brothers in Angola, in Mozambique, South Africa sub-human bondage Have been toppled, utterly destroyed Well, everywhere is war, me say war War in the east, war in the west War up north, war down south War, war, rumours of war And until that day, the African continent Will not know peace, we Africans will fight We find it necessary and we know we shall win As we are confident in the victory Of good over evil, good over evil, good over evil Good over evil, good over evil, good over evil
Listen closely to the text. Totally insightful. Brilliant. :cheers:
jlind wrote:
Seriously EVERYTHING they play with the exception of regaee is great. Even some other "world" music I enjoy, espically some of the Arabic stuff. Every time I hear regaee I just want to puke.
That is sad for you, I think ... hope that you can still appreciate the contribution reggae has made to the world of music, and consciouness. PEACE NorCalDave
1. You don't know that. You suppose it. 2. I think you're confusing hate for his artistic output with hate for the man himself. Maybe some antisocial folks do hate the man himself, but most folks saying they "hate Bob Marley" mean it in the same way as they may hate "The Beach Boys" or whatever - it's the music of the artist, not the people behind it. lovelifealways wrote:
...too many haters out there and it must be said that Bob had more love for his fellow beings in his cancerous toe than the rest of you haters will ever have combined...
...too many haters out there and it must be said that Bob had more love for his fellow beings in his cancerous toe than the rest of you haters will ever have combined...
physicsgenius wrote:
Wow, some truly subtle lyrics here. I wonder what he's trying to say?
He didn't write the lyrics. They're adapted from a translation of a speech by Haile Selassie in 1968 before the United Nations. "That until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned: That until there are no longer first-class and second class citizens of any nation; That until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes; That until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race; That until that day, the dream of lasting peace and world citizenship and the rule of international morality will remain but a fleeting illusion, to be pursued but never attained."
good messages come from Bob Marley unlike some reggae, listen to what the man is saying despite the style.
zonker wrote:
Is there some sort of rule for Radio Paradise that they MUST play reggae every hour or so? I used to work for a classic rock station where the program director would make SURE there was a Stones song in every hour, and I wonder if someone at RP does the same. Jeebus. I'll be listening and really enjoying the selection for about an hour and sure enough ... here comes the reggae. Sorry for the folks who like it, but it really grates on my nerves.
:yes: :yes: :yes:
Is there some sort of rule for Radio Paradise that they MUST play reggae every hour or so? I used to work for a classic rock station where the program director would make SURE there was a Stones song in every hour, and I wonder if someone at RP does the same. Jeebus. I'll be listening and really enjoying the selection for about an hour and sure enough ... here comes the reggae. Sorry for the folks who like it, but it really grates on my nerves.
jlind wrote:
Seriously EVERYTHING they play with the exception of regaee is great. Even some other "world" music I enjoy, espically some of the Arabic stuff. Every time I hear regaee I just want to puke.
r e g g a e
katalyst wrote:
typical American moron
Seriously EVERYTHING they play with the exception of regaee is great. Even some other "world" music I enjoy, espically some of the Arabic stuff. Every time I hear regaee I just want to puke.
zonker wrote:
Uh, no -- just can't stand reggae. I don't like Bush either -- if I had to choose between the two, I'd choose reggae every time, but...
That's actually a hard choice for me, want to vomit 24/7 because my rights are being quickly stripped away, or because I have to listen to this crap... This might be worse.
nuggler wrote:
Ignorance is consciously and/or unconsciously locking down one's own soul. Whichever it might be one does it to oneself & that, my friend, is ignorance....
So, to summarize, you are contending that ignorance is ignorance. I can't disagree with that. It's not very englightening though.
ploafmaster wrote:
Yeah, all music does have it's place. For me personally, this song's place is far away as possible. Nobody's yet been able to explain to me why not liking most Marley or most reggae is ignorant, or displaying a lack of knowledge (that's what ignorance is, after all). If you're going to make a personal statement like that, you should be able to qualify it. If my dislike of this song, or use of the emoticon that Bill provided, makes me ignorant, than tell me why.
Ignorance is consciously and/or unconsciously locking down one's own soul. Whichever it might be one does it to oneself & that, my friend, is ignorance....
djblitz wrote:
It's so sad how many 1's there are for this song. Those people must be Bush war mongers.
Uh, no -- just can't stand reggae. I don't like Bush either -- if I had to choose between the two, I'd choose reggae every time, but...
katalyst wrote:
typical American moron
I don't like reggae... but I want RP to play all kinds, because then we have all sorts of crazy music lovers here! I don't mute the songs I don't like, to give them another chance, but I'm probably not singing along either.
Nice...perfect for a Friday. The dream is still alive. :biggrin:
djblitz wrote:
It's so sad how many 1's there are for this song. Those people must be Bush war mongers.
What a retarded comment. I don't support the war but to generalize like that is ridiculous.
Wow, some truly subtle lyrics here. I wonder what he's trying to say?
Godlike
katalyst wrote:
All music has its place. Try not to be ignorant your whole life
Yeah, all music does have it's place. For me personally, this song's place is far away as possible. Nobody's yet been able to explain to me why not liking most Marley or most reggae is ignorant, or displaying a lack of knowledge (that's what ignorance is, after all). If you're going to make a personal statement like that, you should be able to qualify it. If my dislike of this song, or use of the emoticon that Bill provided, makes me ignorant, than tell me why.
ploafmaster wrote:
Here we go a vomiting... :puke:
All music has its place. Try not to be ignorant your whole life
jlind wrote:
If only RP would never play reggae it would be perfect.
typical American moron
SCJoniguy wrote:
Gee, this dude does reggae almost as good as Willie Nelson! ;~) :mrgreen:
you are so wrong.....why dont you take your cowboy out of your ass
10
ploafmaster wrote:
Yeah, I must be - wait, I didn't vote for him in either election. If this song was just about the words, I'd rate it high. But then, if it was just about the words, it wouldn't be a song, would it?
So what is it about, then? Giving **TWENTY** Bob Marley songs a rating of "1"? Glad to see you rating the song as opposed to the artist, I love how I can track your artist bias in your voting history. LOL, thanks for the criticism though....look in the mirror before dishing it out because I'll give it right back. Tres lame. :arghhh:
djblitz wrote:
It's so sad how many 1's there are for this song. Those people must be Bush war mongers.
Yeah, I must be - wait, I didn't vote for him in either election. If this song was just about the words, I'd rate it high. But then, if it was just about the words, it wouldn't be a song, would it?
Truer words were never spoken! Bob lives on... :clap:
WAR-WAR-WAR up your nose,WAR-WAR-WAR in the yard
Jah rules !!
TobalMoreno wrote:
200 votes average to a 6.7?? Come on people! 10
It's so sad how many 1's there are for this song. Those people must be Bush war mongers.
more reggae please
Seems kind of ironic how this song reflects the ongoing strife between the Reggae lovers and haters on RP. "Victory of Good over Evil"
200 votes average to a 6.7?? Come on people! 10
Is it just me, or has this whole set been sub par by RP standards?
Gee, this dude does reggae almost as good as Willie Nelson! ;~) :mrgreen:
The live version with "No More Trouble" at the end is better. I'll reserve the 10 for that. This version gets just a 9.
Until the philosophy which hold one race superior And another Inferior Is finally And permanently Discredited And abandoned - Everywhere is war - Me say war. That until there no longer First class and second class citizens of any nation Until the colour of a man's skin Is of no more significance than the colour of his eyes - Me say war.
jlind wrote:
If only RP would never play reggae it would be perfect.
Allow me to say "What??" We should be allowing everything into an eclectic format, and why not reggae, and reggae's most popular exponent? If RP played no reggae, it would be sadly incomplete, missing a vital ingredient of funk, sans soul. We need this!
If only RP would never play reggae it would be perfect.
Bob Marley was one of the most visionary and influential musicians of the era. He rose from absolutely nothing to become one of the most revered names in music. You can go anywhere in he world and hear Bob's music. His humanity and political consciousness touched people of every walk of life. Very few artists, especially in the pre-MTV era, were able to truly become world stars. Bob deserves avery accolade we can heap upon him. It doesn't take ganja to appreciate Bob. Unfortunately, too many people simply see that aspect of his life, which was part of his religion. Say what you will about Rastafarianism, but his deeply held beliefs helped make Bob Marley the great artist he was. Long after 99% of today's musical acts are lost in the fog of time, Bob Marley will still stand tall. :notworthy:
could never get into marley Once lived in a flat where everybody smoked 10 spliffs a day listening to marley non-stop got sick of it
Ziller wrote:
You putz, the lyrics for this song are taken from a speech given by Haile Selassie. I'll leave it to you to look up who he was...
That's interesting, I recognized the lyric (unfortunately), as that screetch from Sinead OConnor a few years back, that got her so deservidly booed. She really ruined something that Mr. Marley made sound so cool...
I sense a bit of irony in playing this after a song on Paul Simon's Graceland album.
Here we go a vomiting... :puke:
japanmoran wrote:
Reggae is the kind of music to have playing off in the background while you stare off at the sunset standing on the beach with a cold beverage in hand. :-)
tourist. you're not even listening, are you?
Reggae is the kind of music to have playing off in the background while you stare off at the sunset standing on the beach with a cold beverage in hand. :-)
:yawn: Blah at best. Ho-hum.
Hannio wrote:
That's right! That was Tolstoy's original title for his book.
"Elaine!?!"
I'm just SO happy to hear one of the lesser played Marley songs!
trekhead wrote:
"Of course, we all know it was originally going to be called"WAR, WHAT IS IT GOOD FOR?" absolutely nothin'...
That's right! That was Tolstoy's original title for his book.
I think that the extremes of like and dislike on this comment board proves that this music has an impact. It was meant to provoke a response. And it has achieved its' goal. Bob Marley and Reggae Forever!!!!
"Of course, we all know it was originally going to be called"WAR, WHAT IS IT GOOD FOR?" absolutely nothin'...
ANNE_MARIE wrote:
perhaps the manor in which the women are "shouting war" is not intended to be groovy or soothing or cool, maybe they are conveying their dislike and disgust for war with tone and volume. just a crazy guess on my part... that's what I hear. the lyrics shake me up too! more Bob Marley please! thanks R&B!!!
How do you know they are in a manor? Maybe they are just in a plain house or even outdoors. Probably they are in a studio in an office building, though. I'm not sure shouting "war" in a manor conveys dislike or disgust for anything, really. I mean, unless they were trying to stir up the domestics or something.
JokesandJokesandJokes wrote:
RACIST!!
:lol:
Fantastic. Thanks, Bill
.edited
Apropos for our times
oldslabsides wrote:
reggae sucks :P
RACIST!!
GolfRomeo wrote:
Christ, thanks, Bill. Here I am, trying to get work done, and you throw a Marley spliff grenade in my foxhole. How the hell am I supposed to work now? Spin some Franklin's Tower like you did yesterday and I'll be finished off for the week...
Dude Republicans don't like reggae or the Dead!!! Quit lying!!